May 15, 2021
  • 5:47 pm Data file: Redundancy and collective consultation
  • 5:47 pm How a tribunal tests for harm
  • 5:45 pm IT helps HR lay foundation for other functions
  • 5:43 pm Powercut
  • 5:39 pm Learning to think outside the books

first_imgIT helps HR lay foundation for other functionsOn 9 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article The Internet and technology will push HR up the pecking order in companies,Vance Kearney, vice-president for EMEA at Oracle, told delegates. He pointed out that no e-business could be effective without HR information,as sales, marketing, procurement and financial departments need the data. HR has a crucial part to play in developing global systems and instandardising and integrating those systems. But Kearney warned HR directors not to get carried away with their role asthe business partner and described the function as a support service likecustomer services or sales. “There is a big myth about HR. It is no different from any other kind ofservice, such as the sales or finance departments, it is just a service to thebusiness, and is not that elaborate,” he said. “We hire people, try not to loose them, get the best out them while wecan and while we have them.” Kearney said HR directors should follow other support functions in their useof technology. “Customer services and sales are being revolutionised by the Internet,bringing better data, service, happier customers with lower staff numbers. HRdirectors asking “what is next?” should be looking at these sales andservice departments.” Oracle’s experience demonstrates the cost and efficiency benefits of theInternet for HR. The company’s customer service call centres have seen a 45 per cent drop inthe number of calls since it introduced self-service assistance via theInternet. last_img read more

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first_img Comments are closed. HCM vital for business successOn 6 Apr 2004 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Duncan Brown, assistant director-general at the Chartered Institute ofPersonnel and Development, explains why human capital management should top thebusiness agenda.At the Amsterdam summit, I gave an overview on the Chartered Institute ofPersonnel and Development’s (CIPD) extensive work on human capital. It iscertainly an area of growing interest, and it was the fourth such presentationthat I have made this year already. The likely future requirement of UK companies to report on their humancapital in annual reports and accounts is – at last – galvanising moreconcerted attention, and, hopefully, action. The event largely consisted of illustrations of the application of Kaplanand Norton’s original methodology, now detailed further in terms of itsapplication to the so-called ‘intangible assets’ – of which people are the mostsignificant. Some may find this specific application a little over-engineered for their tastes,although the case studies shed a lot of light on the broader process ofagreeing how to best leverage staff for competitive advantage, and how tomeasure and achieve it. The CIPD is currently drafting a free guide on how to go about human capitalreporting with a taskforce of industry experts. It aims to give a broader viewof the measurement process and how to go about it, and should be available bymid 2004. But whatever methodology or approach you prefer, the taskforce members havereinforced that the huge potential value that people can add to an organisationcan only be realised if you measure and manage that value effectively. HRprofessionals need to play a leading role in doing this. The message is: do it proactively yourself to add value to your people, yourbusiness and your function, rather than waiting to have it imposed on you fromthe outside. www.cipd.co.uk Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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first_img View post tag: News by topic Share this article View post tag: Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today HMS Daring Visits Saudi Arabia to Reinforce Mutual Relationship View post tag: Relationship View post tag: visits View post tag: Mutual View post tag: Daring View post tag: Saudi Arabiacenter_img View post tag: Naval May 21, 2012 Training & Education View post tag: HMS View post tag: Reinforce One of the Royal Navy’s most advanced warships, HMS Daring, has made an official stop in Saudi Arabia to reinforce the country’s strong relationship with the UK, Ministry of Defence announced on May 17.The Portsmouth-based Type 45 destroyer is on her first operational deployment in the Gulf where she is working with partner nations, including Saudi Arabia, to disrupt drug smuggling, trafficking and piracy in the region.The port visit to Al Jubayl provided a good opportunity to host 200 selected guests and VIPs so HMS Daring could display her impressive capabilities as an air defence warship.Helping to reinforce the good working relationship that exists between the UK and Saudi Arabia, both of which are committed to the fight against global terrorism, the visit also emphasised the strong military bond between the two countries.The United Kingdom Maritime Component Commander, Commodore Simon Ancona, who was in the country for an official visit, also attended as the senior Royal Navy officer.Commanding Officer of HMS Daring, Captain Guy Robinson, said:“It was a great privilege for me to take HMS Daring alongside in Al Jubayl for the first time. The visit provided an excellent opportunity to build on the strong relationship between the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia.“They make a very significant contribution to fighting terrorism in the region while being a trusted naval partner. This visit to Saudi Arabia was a first for me and a large number of my ship’s company and it was a welcome break in a busy period working with Combined Maritime Forces.”The tried and tested mutual bonding over a sporting match also took place with Daring’s rugby team beating local side the Al Khobar Quins 36-5. Around 30 senior Saudi naval personnel were also given tours of the ship as well as 50 local schoolchildren.Lieutenant Thomas Wyatt, who helped host the tours, said:“It was great to be able to show the Saudis our ship. It is always really useful to show our allies and partners in the Gulf our capabilities. However it is always a pleasure to show a group of enthusiastic schoolchildren around as well.”Ships working as part of the Combined Maritime Forces (CMF) are tasked with a range of activities including sea security, counter-piracy, and maintaining stability in the region.CMF are also ready to respond to any environmental or humanitarian crisis and are specifically committed to defeating violent extremists, thwarting piracy, reducing illegal trafficking of people and drugs, and promoting the maritime environment as a safe place for mariners with legitimate business.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , May 21, 2012; Image: Mod UK HMS Daring Visits Saudi Arabia to Reinforce Mutual Relationshiplast_img read more

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first_img “Magicicada Unexpected Road” from 2013’s “Bug Music” features Rothenberg on the bass clarinet and his son, Umru, iPad, playing live with cicadas in Lexington, Va.,  in spring 2012.  “The Boori Sound” from“Nightingales in Berlin” features a nightingale, Rothenberg on clarinet, Lembe Lokk’s vocals, and Sanna Salmenkallio on violin. It was recorded in Viktoriapark, Kreuzberg, Berlin, in May 2017. “The nightingale and mockingbird have the most interesting complicated musical songs — can you even quantify that?” — David Rothenberg David Rothenberg ’84 lives on the brink of discovery.A composer, Rothenberg takes the familiar sounds of birds singing, insects chirping, ponds bubbling, and combines them with music, creating a melodious and distinctly unique mélange from what others might hear as background noise — or miss entirely.“Nature is just there, it shows up, but we are not always paying attention, so we don’t actually listen,” he said. “If you listen, you can hear amazing things.”Whether he is recording the sounds of nightingales in Berlin, whales in the ocean, or cicadas that found their way onto his shirtsleeve, to Rothenberg the unconventional sounds are a door to a world of information.“I always thought animal music should be something music students do,” said Rothenberg, a jazz clarinetist, composer, and professor of philosophy and music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. “You should study these sounds that are millions of years old, the way they are put together, and figure out how they fit in now.”Rothenberg grew up interested in math and science, but when he went to Harvard in 1980, he became absorbed in music, philosophy, environmental science, and “unusual things.” Some of his professors helped him learn to apply what he calls “mystical approaches,” or personally inspired approaches, to music. It transformed him.“I was always looking for somewhere else to go, some other thing,” Rothenberg said. “I was in between disciplines until I graduated in 1984 so I actually created my own discipline — music and communication. Not communication in any technical sense, it was anthropology, literature, and spiritual things.”,PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreencenter_img “Never Satisfied” from the record “Whale Music,” also packaged with the book “Thousand Mile Song,” features David Rothenberg playing clarinet live with humpback whales off the coast of Maui, Hawaii, in February 2007.,PlayPlayPauseSeek0% buffered00:00Current time00:00Toggle MuteVolumeToggle CaptionsToggle Fullscreen Rothenberg grew up in Connecticut with parents who listened to classical music while he indulged his own penchant for jazz — not the jazz of the day by Miles Davis or John Coltrane, but obscure music by lesser-known artists.“I am constantly looking for things off the map, for musicians who are a little different, and investigating them and celebrating them,” he said. “It’s the in between, the people who are less recognized who are more interesting.”Never making determined career choices, Rothenberg followed his instincts until he firmly connected music and nature in the 1990s.“I was into music, but this wasn’t planned out. I met people around the world interested in this,” he said. “I got interested in sounds I previously ignored and just decided to play music with birds and realized it was a whole new thing I should pursue.”Since then, 16 albums, three books, a documentary film, and international acclaim have brought Rothenberg’s work to the front of contemporary sound. But the low pitch of crickets when it’s cold outside, or the sound blue jays make when they’re sleeping, are narratives that scientists have not yet learned to completely read, he said.“Scientists have to measure things thousands of times and be objective,” he said, “But the nightingale and mockingbird have the most interesting complicated musical songs — can you even quantify that?”Rothenberg believes the answer lies in perspective. Ask a biologist, a poet, a musician, a naturalist, a farmer, and a hunter-gatherer to describe the same bird and they will all say different things. He encourages people to listen to all of them — as well as what’s going on in their backyards. It may be interesting.“There’s a sense of wonder and mystery to the nature sounds around us,” he said. “It’s not hard to hear these things, you just have to listen.”Rothenberg will talk about the relationship between humans and nature, play his clarinet, and demonstrate “What Nature Sounds Are Music” at the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University on Saturday, 2‒3:30 p.m. 125 Arborway, Boston. Registration requested. https://bit.ly/2CPUI5qlast_img read more

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first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaPERRY, Ga. — Standing behind a table covered with art, photos and brochures, Sage Edwards isn’t representing herself. She’s standing in for Monticello, Ga., in Georgia’s first agritourism, or “farm fun,” symposium Nov. 14 at the Georgia National Fair & Agricenter.”Monticello is a favorite place to visit for a lot of tourists,” said Edwards, director of the Better Hometown and Downtown Development Authority in Monticello. “It’s a green place. … Agritourism is a big thing for our town.”Edwards said they recently hosted a group from China who wanted a “true Southern experience.” After feasting on country ham and biscuits, they toured Jasper County for some Georgia farm fun.Together, agriculture and related businesses make up the state’s top industry. Tourism is next. Pulling out-of-state visitors into Georgia is big business, with 62 million people in 2006. But it’s not the only market. And traditional tourism venues aren’t the only products.”There are a lot of people in Atlanta, and several hundred thousand have never seen a farm,” said Charlie Gatlin, Georgia’s deputy commissioner of tourism and marketing. “There’s a market right there for us to go after. All we need to do is tell the story.”Telling the story was one of many emphases of the “Symposium of Discovery: Agritourism and the Creative Economies in Georgia.” The Georgia Department of Economic Development, the Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development at the University of Georgia, Market Festival on the Square and Agri-Tour Solutions hosted the event.Attendees soaked up ideas and did a little marketing.Charles Cowart of Still Pond Vineyards and Winery near Arlington, Ga., told how his business went from growing grapes to bottling wine.Several years ago, he realized Still Pond needed an outlet, besides the fresh market, for their grapes. After starting with a pasteurized grape juice, they moved into wine. This year, they ran 900 tons of fruit through their facilities, with some of the juice going to other wineries and the rest processed in-house.They get customers down a 2-mile dirt road to their facility mainly by word of mouth.”There’s got to be a reason for them to come seek us out,” he said. “We’ve got to have a pretty package. We’ve got to have an excellent product in the package” and have “Southern hospitality” when people come. “You have to be passionate about what you’re doing.”AGNET, the CAED agritourism Web site (www.caed.uga.edu), lists 650 farm- and nature-related tourism venues in Georgia. These attractions, from farmers markets to fish hatcheries, have an off-the-farm value of $60 million a year.”We feel, given our natural advantages and the consumer demand, we can grow tremendously from that level,” CAED director John McKissick said.With only 2 percent to 4 percent of Georgians living on farms, having an organized voice would help. It’s a way to market what the state is already doing, said Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Tommy Irvin.”I’ve been on your farms,” he told the crowd. “I’ve been in your vineyards. I guess it’s no secret to us what we’re doing. But we have to tell others what we’re doing.”Scott Angle, dean and director of the UGA College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, noted the benefits of branded names in Georgia.”We’ve got some great examples here already,” he said, citing Vidalia onions and Claxton Fruit Cakes. “I know some people who have traveled to Georgia to spend a day learning what makes Vidalia onions different. … There are all kinds of things in Georgia that we could be marketing.”Cowart told of an Atlanta reporter who turned off his headlights on his way to Arlington and got his first real glimpse of stars.”There are a lot of people out there,” he said, “who long for a stay in our world.”last_img read more

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York When the news hit this summer that many Pathmark stores would be closing as part of the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company’s bankruptcy, I was stunned, as most here were.For decades the supermarket has been part of our lives on Long Island. And I’m old enough to remember when the store in Franklin Square opened in the late 1960s.But, for reasons I’m not quite sure of, I can’t feel any nostalgia for the place.Maybe that’s because it’s always been there. Or because, somewhere deep in my cranium, I can remember it meant as a boy that my Mom and I were no longer going to be making trips to Hills Supermarket on Franklin Avenue, which ultimately had to close down, or the A&P on Dutch Broadway in Elmont, which persisted into the 1990s, and where one of the cashiers, Clara, had been nice to me since I was even a much younger toddler.There were times when I’d accompany my parents to Pathmark in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and it always seemed like a chore. In those days, it was considered safe to let a kid wander around alone inside. I would check out the cereal aisle, to see if there were any neat premiums being offered in that era’s assemblage of Quisp and Quake and Sugar Crisp and so many other cereals whose names remain familiar. I still peruse the cereal boxes, to see if there are any neat toys being offered inside.There was also a toy section featuring an assemblage somewhat bigger than what has become the usual assortment of supermarket bits and pieces.Ultimately, the neatest feature at Pathmark for a youngster may have been a huge paperback section featuring an amazing array of bestsellers and non-fiction books. Pathmark was where I bought some of my very first books on the history of movies, including, in my monster-loving youth, a biography of Boris Karloff!From its inception in Franklin Square, Pathmark had tried to be unique. At the back of the store was a section invoking the classic Horn and Hardart cafeterias in Manhattan, famous for all the food, sandwiches and cakes and the like, being offered through slots in the wall protected by a glass cover. If you put coins in the apparatus, you could lift the cover and take your treat.  Horn and Hardart was famous for the quality of its offerings, and for being a very affordable place for any New Yorker to put together a decent meal. More than one location also became known as a writers’ hangout, with some of the best-known reporters and talent of the era sitting for a long while, sipping their coffee, and enjoying the conversation.Beginning in the 1970s, Pathmark also had a long running series of television commercials, starring James Karen. Most of us probably presumed he was a Pathmark executive, until he also began popping up as an actor in horror movies like “Poltergeist” and “The Return of the Living Dead.”As I moved back and forth from our area over the decades, Pathmark was my supermarket of choice.But then, about five years ago, something very sad began to happen, at least at a couple of Pathmark locations that I frequented. If you weren’t careful, it was far too easy to buy out-of-date products off Pathmark’s shelves. My discovery occurred when making a salad dressing mix one night, and a strange gelatinous form suddenly floated to the top of the bowl. I looked at the expiration date on the ingredients box. It had passed six months earlier.I didn’t stop shopping at Pathmark. I just became disappointed, and far more careful.Besides, I was very fond of some of the employees, and I had a particular problem: I am addicted to Pathmark Instant Coffee. Or at least I was. The store’s been out of its own label for a while.I’ve been compensating by experimenting with a myriad of other makes. In years past, I would take several jars with me, on the road.It was odd, by the way, when earlier this year, my local Pathmark reached into the warehouse, and began using plastic bags, from some time back, apparently having run out of the newer editions.I also love the deli counter’s fried chicken. To me, it’s the best in New York by far. Pathmark must have a proprietary recipe, which I can only hope it’ll share with its successor.The loss of the store, otherwise, doesn’t seem particularly perceptible. After all, there will be another supermarket in its place.What has been heartbreaking, however, is seeing the looks of uncertainty in the eyes of so many of the long-time employees, and even on the faces of the store’s younger veterans. All told, more than 4,000 people on Long Island could be without a job by Thanksgiving. My greatest hope is that the new owners will do the right thing for those who have been part of our lives for such a very long time.James H. Burns is a writer/actor living in Franklin Square, who has written for The Village Voice, Newsday, CBS.COM, The Sporting News and The New York Times.last_img read more

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first_imgMy first job after college was as a help desk service representative in an insurance company. I knew it wasn’t a position I wanted to be in long term, but it was a way to get my foot in the door. After working in that position a few months, I realized I wanted to work toward a leadership role. It seemed so glamorous–having the authority to make decisions, being in charge of a department, and making more money. Setting my sights on leadership seemed like the next best step.As I moved up the leadership ranks in my career, I realized leadership was very different from my first impression. It wasn’t about prestige, power, money or authority. It was about service, humility, relationships and influence. In fact, being a leader wasn’t as exciting and glamorous as I had expected. It came with a lot of responsibility, a lot of headaches, and some choices that weren’t always easy to make. There were many moments of impact and fulfillment, but there were also times of high demands and high stress.I had the blessing of having a few excellent leaders in my career who modeled great leadership through coaching, developing and mentoring.  I also had several bosses who taught me what not to do. These leaders were focused on themselves—how much power and control they had and how to expand their turf. Although working for the latter wasn’t inspiring or easy, I learned from these experiences. Not everyone is cut out to be a leader, and having the desire to lead and the skills to lead are two different things. Having the desire to be a leader is important, but desire must be met with modern and influential leadership skills.Leadership isn’t about working our way up the corporate ladder to one day finally arrive and say, “Wow, I’ve made it.” True leadership is a journey, not a destination. Leadership is a state of being, not a role one fills while at work. The work toward leadership isn’t just important for when we prepare for a leadership role. In fact, once “appointed” to a leadership role, the real work has just begun. continue reading » 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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first_imgHistoric triple-header of women’s world title fights on Saturday night, live on Sky Sports, will also be streamed for free on YouTube, Facebook and skysports.com; Katie Taylor headlines, Terri Harper makes a defence of her world title and Rachel Ball battles to become the latest champion Last Updated: 10/11/20 1:00pm 0:35 Anthony Joshua says Katie Taylor will be remembered in boxing long after she finally retires from the sport Adam Smith, Sky Sports Head of Boxing Development said: ”We’re delighted to be able to make Saturday’s triple-header of women’s world title fights, a world first, available to a wider audience to showcase some of the brightest talents in the sport.“We’ve been with Katie from the beginning of her professional journey and are proud to be a part of the boom we’re seeing in women’s boxing. Through live streaming the action, we are able to bring more boxing fans closer to the hard-hitting action than ever before with this world first.”Eddie Hearn, managing director of Matchroom Sport, said: “This is more ground-breaking news that helps us push women’s boxing to where it needs to be.“The momentum of the last few years led by Katie Taylor has been special to watch but we have still got a long way to go. Nights like Saturday change the narrative of the sport, and as I have said before, it’s not men’s boxing and it’s not women’s boxing, it’s just boxing.“Katie Taylor is a trailblazer and it is only right that she headlines this card on Saturday on a moment that we have all been working towards for a very long time.“The key is to give these great fighters the platform to become stars and achieve their dreams. Without the support from Sky Sports this would not be possible and I’m so happy that so many people will be able to watch Saturday’s event.” 0:23 Anthony Joshua says Katie Taylor will be remembered in boxing long after she finally retires from the sport ‘Gutierrez will be a tough test for Taylor’ Sky Sports has announced that it will make this Saturday’s Fight Night boxing – including undisputed lightweight champion Katie Taylor’s defence against Miriam Gutierrez – available to all via multiple digital platforms.Taylor’s lightweight bout against Spaniard Gutiérrez – as well as Terri Harper’s WBC super-featherweight defence against Katharina Thanderz and Rachel Ball’s WBA bantamweight title fight with Jorgelina Guanini – will be available to Sky Sports customers on Sky Sports Arena and non-subscribers alike, this Saturday from 7pm on the broadcaster’s YouTube and Facebook channels, as well as on www.skysports.com.As part of Sky Sports’ commitment to women’s sport – first announced back in March – the move comes with the aim of ensuring elite women’s sport is more easily accessible to the public through both increasing its existing coverage and by strengthening its digital output. – Advertisement – – Advertisement – – Advertisement – ‘Gutierrez will be a tough test for Taylor’ As always, Sky Sports will take fans to the heart of the sporting drama, follow @SkySportsBoxing or go to skysports.com/boxing.To read more about Sky Sports’ commitment to women’s sport click here. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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first_imgWahyu and Agustiani have also been named suspects in the case.Read also: PDI-P on defensive over graft scandalSaeful, who once served under PDI-P secretary-general Hasto Kristiyanto,  reportedly gave both suspects a total of S$57,350 – equal to Rp 600 million (US$36,056).The KPK arrested Wahyu and the two other suspects on Jan. 8 and named them, along with Harun, suspects in the case. Wahyu allegedly accepted Rp 600 million from Harun through Saeful. Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) prosecutors indicted businessman Saeful Bahri, who was also identified as a member of the Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P), for his alleged involvement in a bribery case implicating General Elections Commission (KPU) commissioner Wahyu Setiawan.The antigraft body indicted Saeful despite the lack of testimony from PDI-P politician Harun Masiku, who was also named a suspect in the case and deemed a key witness. Harun has been at large since he was named a suspect by the KPK on Jan. 9.Kompas.com reported that KPK prosecutor Ronald Worotikan indicted Saeful for allegedly bribing Wahyu and former Elections Supervisory Agency (Bawaslu) member Agustiani Tio Fridelina in exchange for the KPU commissioner’s approval for the politician to fill the seat of a deceased politician in the House of Representatives. The antigraft body marched on with the indictment despite the absence of key witness Harun’s testimony against Saeful. The KPK has not made any significant progress in locating Harun.KPK deputy chairman Nurul Ghufron previously said investigators had searched for Harun in 13 locations but to no avail. He added that Harun had “taken himself off the grid” by not  using telecommunication devices, complicating the search.Nurul went on to say that the KPK had not found any indication that the PDI-P politician was being hidden but declined to provide further details on the antigraft body’s effort in locating the suspect.Read also: Lawmakers doubt immigration system error claims in Harun’s escapeThe case had dragged in Law and Human Rights Minister Yasonna Laoly, also a PDI-P politician. Many accused him of covering up Harun’s whereabouts after the ministry’s Immigration Directorate General announced that Harun was still out of country when he was named a suspect.It was later discovered that Harun had returned to Indonesia two days prior to his suspect naming at the KPK. The revelation triggered the dismissal of Immigration Director General Ronny Sompie and the formation of the ministry’s special fact-finding team, which concluded that there had been an error in the immigration database, resulting in the false information on Harun’s whereabouts. (mfp)Topics :last_img read more

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