May 15, 2021
  • 5:47 pm Data file: Redundancy and collective consultation
  • 5:47 pm How a tribunal tests for harm
  • 5:45 pm IT helps HR lay foundation for other functions
  • 5:43 pm Powercut
  • 5:39 pm Learning to think outside the books

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article A harm test has been adopted by employment tribunals when consideringrequests to work part-time in cases brought under the Sex Discrimination Act. The following criteria are typically taken into account during a harm test: – The work requires continuity of service – It is not possible to do the job at the times the employee wants to work – The employee has supervisory responsibilities and there are no suitablemeans to delegate part of their responsibilities – The job involves team work – The cost of training someone else to do the remaining time or parts of thejob would be prohibitive – The nature of the work is such that it cannot be split How a tribunal tests for harmOn 5 Jun 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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first_img Pinterest Unidentified human remains found near Kosciusko County swamp WhatsApp Pinterest Google+ By Carl Stutsman – April 4, 2020 0 346 Facebook Twitter Google+ Twitter WhatsApp IndianaLocalNews Facebook (“police line do not cross” by Heather, CC BY 2.0) PIERCETON, Ind. (AP) — Police in Kosciusko County say human remains discovered near a swamp have been sent to a forensic center in Fort Wayne for analysis.The unidentified human remains were found Thursday by witnesses who alerted police after stumbling across them while walking along the edge of a field near a swamp several hundred yards from State Road 13 in Kosciusko County.The county’s sheriff’s department says authorities examined the remains and used state-of-the-art technology to search the surrounding area for potential evidence.County Coroner Anthony Ciriello says the remains would be transported to the Northeast Indiana Forensic Center in Fort Wayne for further examination. Previous articleTwo men shot at Marion and 6th Streets in ElkhartNext articleIndiana nearing 4,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases Carl Stutsmanlast_img read more

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first_imgAs has been the fashion at Terrapin Crossroads this year, Phil Lesh & Friends played a full setlist from a past Grateful Dead show. Bringing along son/guitarist Grahame Lesh, guitarist Stu Allen, drumming duo Ezra Lipp and Alex Koford, and keyboardist Scott Guberman, this particular show was a re-creation of the Dead’s September 28th, 1993 show at the Boston Garden, in Boston, MA.Take a listen to the show, which includes “Touch of Grey”, “Bird Song”, “China Cat Sunflower > I Know You Rider”, “Throwing Stones” and more. This particular show/setlist was one of six that the Dead played at Boston Garden that year. Listen to the full audio below, courtesy of Quinfolk and WMWV Radio:You can also watch “So Many Roads” from the show, courtesy of Andy Logan:Setlist: Phil Lesh & Friends at Terrapin Crossroads, San Rafael, CA – 9/20/16Set One: Touch Of Grey -> Greatest Story Ever Told, Row Jimmy, New Minglewood Blues, So Many Roads, When I Paint My Masterpiece, Bird SongSet Two: China Cat Sunflower -> I Know You Rider, Samson And Delilah, Uncle John’s Band -> Playing In The Band -> Drums -> Space -> Attics Of My Life -> Throwing Stones -> Good Lovin’Encore: U.S. Blues[via JamBase]last_img read more

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first_imgGeologists have found evidence that sea ice extended to the equator 716.5 million years ago, bringing new precision to a “snowball Earth” event long suspected of occurring around that time.Led by scientists at Harvard University, the team reports on its work in the journal Science (released March 4). The new findings — based on an analysis of ancient tropical rocks in remote northwestern Canada — bolster the theory that the planet has, at times in the past, been covered with ice at all latitudes.“This is the first time that the Sturtian glaciation [the name for that ice age] has been shown to have occurred at tropical latitudes, providing direct evidence that this particular glaciation was a ‘snowball Earth’ event,” said lead author Francis A. Macdonald, an assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard. “Our data also suggests that the Sturtian glaciation lasted a minimum of 5 million years.”The survival of eukaryotic life ­­­— organisms composed of one or more cells, each with a nucleus enclosed by a membrane — throughout this period indicates that sunlight and surface water remained available somewhere on the surface of Earth. The earliest animals arose at roughly the same time, following a major proliferation of eukaryotes.Even on a snowball Earth, Macdonald said, there would be temperature gradients, and it is likely that ice would be dynamic: flowing, thinning, and forming local patches of open water, providing refuge for life.“The fossil record suggests that all of the major eukaryotic groups, with the possible exception of animals, existed before the Sturtian glaciation,” Macdonald said. “The questions that arise from this are: If a snowball Earth existed, how did these eukaryotes survive? Moreover, did the Sturtian snowball Earth stimulate evolution and the origin of animals?”“From an evolutionary perspective,” he added, “it’s not always a bad thing for life on Earth to face severe stress.”The rocks that Macdonald and his colleagues analyzed in Canada’s Yukon Territory showed glacial deposits and other signs of glaciation, such as striated clasts, ice-rafted debris, and deformation of soft sediments. The scientists were able to determine, based on the magnetism and composition of these rocks, that 716.5 million years ago they were located at sea level in the tropics, at about 10 degrees latitude.“Because of the high albedo [light reflection] of ice, climate modeling has long predicted that if sea ice were ever to develop within 30 degrees latitude of the equator, the whole ocean would rapidly freeze over,” Macdonald said. “So our result implies quite strongly that ice would have been found at all latitudes during the Sturtian glaciation.”Scientists don’t know exactly what caused this glaciation or what ended it, but Macdonald says its age of 716.5 million years closely matches the age of a large igneous province stretching more than 930 miles from Alaska to Ellesmere Island in far northeastern Canada. This coincidence could mean the glaciation was either precipitated or terminated by volcanic activity.Macdonald’s co-authors on the Science paper are research assistant Phoebe A. Cohen; David T. Johnston, assistant professor of earth and planetary sciences; and Daniel P. Schrag, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology and Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, all of Harvard. Other co-authors are Mark D. Schmitz and James L. Crowley of Boise State University; Charles F. Roots of the Geological Survey of Canada; David S. Jones of Washington University in St. Louis; Adam C. Maloof of Princeton University; and Justin V. Strauss.The work was supported by the Polar Continental Shelf Project and the National Science Foundation’s Geobiology and Environmental Geochemistry Program.last_img read more

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first_imgWine is becoming a big business in Georgia, and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is working to support this growing sector of the economy by providing new expertise for wine growers.Earlier this month, UGA Extension hired its first full-time wine grape specialist. Cain Hickey will begin his work with Georgia’s wine growers on March 1.As the state’s Extension viticulturist, Hickey will help wine grape growers in the north Georgia mountains and in west Georgia improve cultural practices in their vineyards, researching new growing practices and varieties that could improve the quality and renown of Georgia’s wines. He’ll also work with the growers of the state’s more traditional vineyard crop, muscadine grapes.”Wine grapes are a growing agricultural commodity in Georgia, which offers some distinct advantages,” said Mark McCann, UGA Extension’s Agriculture and Natural Resources assistant dean. “They can fit in small and medium acreage, winemaking is a value-added process and the aesthetic properties of a vineyard offer agritourism opportunities. The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is pleased to add a viticulturist to serve this growing industry.”In 2005, almost all of the state’s 1,834 acres of grapevines were muscadine grapes grown in south and central Georgia. In 2015 – the latest year for which statistics are available – UGA’s Georgia farm gate value report found that the locus of Georgia’s wine production had spread. While more than 1,000 acres of muscadine grapes are still spread across the state, more growers have introduced traditional and hybrid wine grapes to farms in north Georgia.Habersham County, home to a half-dozen wineries, produced more than $2 million in grapes in 2015. According to a 2014 study by the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, Georgia’s wineries have an annual impact of more than $7 million on the state’s economy.UGA Extension has supported the burgeoning grape and winemaking industry with plant disease and pest experts and through county Extension agents, and Hickey will serve to further Extension’s support efforts. When he begins in March, Hickey will be an assistant professor of viticulture in the college’s Department of Horticulture. Hickey received his doctorate in 2016 from Virginia Tech, where he focused on applied research in several viticultural areas, including irrigation management, cover crop and rootstock use, and canopy and fruit-zone management. He’s worked in viticulture research since 2007.Hickey looks forward to working with Georgia grape and wine industry members to solve regional vineyard management issues through his extension and research appointment.For more information about UGA Extension’s support of Georgia’s agricultural industries, visit extension.uga.edu.last_img read more

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first_imgGeorgia farmers with reduced plant stands can help alleviate those problems next season by correcting settings and using downforce on their planters, according to Wes Porter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension irrigation specialist and precision agriculture expert.Downforce is the pressure farmers apply to their row unit to ensure that it’s maintaining the depth at which the planter is set. Farmers typically set planter depth, but don’t always check or change the downforce of their planters, Porter said.Producers can save time, seed and money by understanding the use of downforce when planting their crops. The downforce system on the planter can help growers avoid planting seed at the incorrect depth — either too deep or too shallow — which can leave the crop vulnerable to the environment, resulting in a lack of germination and stand establishment and subsequent yield loss.High temperatures and lack of rainfall in May led to difficult planting conditions for farmers with dryland fields, or fields lacking adequate irrigation. In multiple fields, Porter discovered that if seeds weren’t planted deep enough, they didn’t germinate and emerge.“If we didn’t put the seed down where it needed to be, right near the surface, soil temperatures were so hot this year we basically burned the seeds and they never germinated,” Porter said. “You can still see poor stands now in fields all around the state.”It’s important to consider the field conditions when setting downforce. Imagine a grower who tries to plant in late spring when it’s dry and near or at 100 degrees Fahrenheit. His planter requires a lot more downforce to plant seeds at the proper depth because the soil is harder. If the grower plants in moist soil, he doesn’t need as much downforce, Porter explained.The same is true if you compare a sandy soil with a soil that contains more clay. Sandy soil is much looser and softer, so farmers don’t need as much downforce versus planting in a clay soil. The amount of downforce is critical for seed to reach the appropriate depth.“There are advanced control systems available, either retrofitted on the tractor or from the factory, that will help maintain downforce at a uniform setting throughout the field, aiding in maintaining the target seed depth. It’s really important, if we want to achieve that proper depth, that we set a proper downforce,” Porter said.Porter learned from communicating with farmers that downforce is a planting factor most don’t usually consider.“A lot of farmers don’t even really know how to properly set the downforce on their planters to match their field conditions. That’s why we started this project — to really show the importance and educate our producers on it,” he said.Porter was recently honored for his work in precision agriculture. For more information, see the CAES Media Newswire.last_img read more

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first_imgBy Dialogo June 14, 2010 Military personnel will reinforce the police to fight the growing crime wave that has led to a spate of daily killings in Honduras, according to a decree approved by the Honduran Congress. The decree establishes that “the Secretary of Defense will put at the disposal of the Secretary of Security the appropriate personnel of the Honduran Armed Forces needed for the National Police to efficiently maintain public order.” According to the decree, the National Police and the armed forces will coordinate their activities with the other state security organs in order to ensure “the prevention and control of and the fight against crime, for the purpose of protecting lives and property within the national territory.” The police, around 14,000 strong, have found themselves powerless to stop the wave of killings, linked chiefly to drug trafficking and kidnappings, of which there have been about forty-four so far this year, so that the help of the 12,000 members of the armed forces is required.last_img read more

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first_imgDesigning Spaces™ airing on the Lifetime® Channel recently featured an educational segment about making the path to homeownership easier. During the episode, the desire for homeownership and the financial hurdles faced by a millennial couple were highlighted.Debi Marie, the host of the show, interviewed Matt Young, Senior VP of Sales with Genworth Mortgage Insurance Corporation about private mortgage insurance (PMI), which could be a perfect fit for members of your credit union who are facing similar questions and challengesHere are some key points from Debi’s interview with Matt:Removing the 20% Down Barrier for Potential HomebuyersAny homeowner knows that accumulating the 20% down for their first home is often one of the biggest financial challenges of their lives. By using PMI, your prospective member homebuyers can purchase a home without having to accumulate the full 20% down payment. This is a big deal since this option can shave years off of the saving process, allowing your members to become homeowners sooner. continue reading » 18SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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first_imgThink of the first three letters Differentiate, Recreate and Educate as the ingredients to bake a one-of-a-kind-out-of-this-world-cake. Now we put them all together and automate (or bake) it.Kirk recommends the new member experience be the first place to try marketing automation.I recently sat in on a conference call regarding Net Promoter Score and found out that most credit unions are not “blowing members away” when they open up their new account.  In fact, very few members will give a promoter score citing “Too early to tell” or “I just opened the account and I don’t feel I know them yet.”But this was even more disconcerting. In a Pacific NW study of credit unions and banks they found that Chase AND Bank of America scored higher with Millennials (18-34) on the “overall recommend” question. They did not cite service as the reason but rather just the opposite. They do a great job making it possible for the Millennial customer to NEVER have to interact with a human. And they do that using automation. continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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first_img“After more than two years of talks between Dubrovnik Airport and Qatar Airways, we finally managed to achieve our goal by establishing this line that will enable direct connection of Dubrovnik with the countries of the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand and Africa. In 2019, Qatar Airways was named the best business class airline in the world by Skytrax, and also won five other top awards for excellence.”, Said from Dubrovnik Airport. Qatar Airways has announced two new routes that will start operating in the first half of 2020. Flights to Dubrovnik, the airline’s second destination after Zagreb, will begin on April 20 next year. “We are pleased to announce that Dubrovnik and Santorini will join our global network in 2020. We are committed to providing our passengers with as many direct links as possible”, Said Akbar Al Baker, CEO of Qatar Airways. As another destination, the company announced Santorini. Qatar Airways thus becomes the first Gulf carrier to establish a direct flight to that Greek destination. Flights will begin on May 20, 2020.center_img Source / photo: Qatar Airways; Dubrovnik Airport; Pixabay The flight will operate three times a week from April 20 to May 18, and from May 18 to September 30 five times a week. From September 30 to October 24 again three times a week. It will operate an Airbus 320 aircraft with 12 seats in business class and 132 seats in economy class.last_img read more

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