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  • 5:39 pm Learning to think outside the books

first_imgFeatures list 2021 – submitting content to Personnel TodayOn this page you will find details of how to submit content to Personnel Today. We do not publish a… Comments are closed. Learning to think outside the booksOn 14 Jan 2003 in Military, Personnel Today Related posts:center_img Previous Article Next Article Managementbooks are all very well, but when it comes to finding real answers to businessproblems, most of us would rather settle down with something completelydifferent. Paul Simpson offers an alternative reading list for HR professionalsEverynew year brings three things: a hangover, a set of new resolutions to make andbreak (even if the new resolutions are merely reheated leftovers), and aplethora of books which promise to change your life, the way you work or howyou think about the way you work.Thelast thing truly effective managers do is read books about other managers’highly effective habits. Nor do they pore over books in which the movement ofcheese, the Tao of something (usually something as far out as the Tao of theTeletubbies) or the activities of polar bear pirates hold the key to success.If it’s enlightenment and entertainment you’re after, this selection of sevenmagnificent (if unorthodox) books may have as much to say about humanresources, in its broadest sense, as the next Tom Peters opus. Let’s face it,nobody thrives on chaos, well, nobody except Attila The Hun and David Brent.AgainstOblivionIanHamiltonPublisher: VikingPrice: £20.00ISBN 067084909XThebook in a paragraphBiographicalessays on 45 20th Century poets by the late Ian Hamilton – the literary sleuthfamous for his pursuit of reclusive cult novelist JD Salinger – accompanied bya sample of the poet’s finest or most representative work. A simple, unoriginalidea inspired by Samuel Johnson’s classic Lives Of the English Poets which, inHamilton’s careful hands, works beautifully. So many of the lives (and untimelydeaths) told here echo each other.HRrelevanceEverycompany pays lip service to the need for creativity, yet this book is a tellingreminder that creative genius has a heavy price tag. Insanity, suicide,alcoholism and the perverse unpredictability of creativity are recurring themesin these lives. These poets are often confined to the margins of society inmuch the same way that, despite all the talk, genuinely creative people areoften marginalised in corporations, silently condemned for not being teamplayers – the very quality which often makes them so valuable. Thecluster of qualities which make employees creative (perseverance in the face offrustration; a high level of self-initiated, task-orientated; striving forexcellence; independence of judgement; autonomy; tolerance for ambiguity; andself-discipline in matters of work) are often exhibited in these lives. Youmight not employ many poets, but you probably do employ creative people whosubscribe to the manic highs, deep lows, and continual insecurity displayedhere –  albeit in a less extreme fashion.Thebottom lineToomany companies have tried to have their cake and eat it, looking for talentedcreative people who are also model employees. As this book conclusively proves,this is one particular circle that just isn’t going to square.TheArt Of HappinessbyThe Dalai Lama and Howard CutlerPublisher: Hodder MobiusPrice: £7.00ISBN 0340750154Thebook in a paragraphItis easy to be cynical about the Dalai Lama since he’s become a poster boy forthe likes of Richard Gere, but you can’t fail to be impressed by the fact that,after almost half a century of exile and oppression, he’s still smiling. Manyleaders have been far more miserable in public with far less cause. So it’seasy to understand why psychologist Howard Cutler assumed the Tibetan religiousleader might know a thing or two about the kind of questions which collectivelycome under the heading “the meaning of life”.HRrelevanceAnybook that grapples with so many big questions (such as, why do we suffer?) willhave some relevance to human resources. And although Cutler’s slightly smarmyprose style jars, this is still a refreshing read. Much of it is not thatrevolutionary or overtly Buddhist. And while the emphasis on kindness,compassion and the importance of seeing situations from different perspectivessounds trite in summary, this is an empowering book. Part of its charm is thatit doesn’t promise any quick fixes.Thebottom lineThatultimate rarity: a book about human relations that doesn’t offer simple answersyet still makes you feel good.Catch-22JosephHellerPublisher: VintagePrice: £6.99ISBN 0-09-947731-9Thebook in a paragraphAngry,hysterically funny, debut novel published 41 years ago, but still as relevanttoday. Typecast as an anti-war novel, this is actually a satire of corporatelife – the corporation so mercilessly pilloried just happens to be the USmilitary. Yossarian, the anti-hero, is trying to avoid combat by insisting he’smad, but as soon as he applies for a discharge he’s judged to be sane, becausehe’s showing rational concern for his own safety. “That’s some catch thatCatch 22,” he says. And a colleague agrees: “It’s the best thereis”.HRrelevanceIfyou really want to know how your most cynical staff really see your company,read Catch-22 and try to see your workplace through the eyes of Yossarian, the essentiallydecent ‘hero’, forced into cynicism by his understandable desire to stay alive.InColonel Cathcart, the officer whose only innovation is to make his pilots flymore missions, Heller has created a classic corporate villain, convincingbecause he isn’t evil just so stupid and desperate for recognition he isoblivious to the fact that he’s endangering his pilots’ lives. Heller’saccount of the politicking, egotism and one-upmanship in the militaryhierarchy, although marvellously exaggerated, will ring true with most managerswho have climbed a few inches up the corporate pole.Oneof the minor charms is the horribly hilarious tale of the world’s worstdisciplinary meeting in which a pilot is told not to interrupt and then to say‘sir’ when he does interrupt.Thebottom lineYou’lllaugh, unless you’ve had all the mirth surgically extracted from your soul, andthen you’ll wonder, uneasily, if your company behaves like Heller’s US AirForce.Churchill’sBlack DogAnthonyStorrPublisher: HarperCollinsPrice: £7.00ISBN 0006375669Thebook in a paragraphStorrwas one of the UK’s greatest psychiatrists and these essays on the theme ofcreativity contain some of his finest work. His analysis of such diversepersonalities as Winston Churchill, Carl Jung and Isaac Newton is surprising,thoughtful and entertaining. Storr reminds us that human nature cannot becategorised by which planet we metaphorically come from and that not all ourchallenges can be overcome by the acquisition of the right life coach.HRrelevanceWithChurchill now officially installed as the BBC’s greatest Briton (see page 23for Personnel Today’s version), this book may enjoy a long overdue revival. Storrflatly contradicts the view, espoused by many modern books on leadership, thatthe art of leading can be reduced to a few key teachable skills. Storr’sexamination of politicians, writers and scientists suggests that the roots ofcharismatic leadership often lies in the leader’s own, often deeply flawed,personality. Churchillis portrayed as what Carl Jung called ‘an intuitive introvert’, capable of bothrare insight and an utter lack of understanding of his colleagues’ feelings –not that unrecognisable as a type in today’s business world. As a leader hefought depression (what he called his “black dog”), his own nature (hisoften rash displays of physical courage may have been prompted by his own fearthat he lacked courage) and a lack of self-esteem caused by parental neglect.Thebottom lineAttimes, this has the breadth and depth of the work of Charles Handy, the authorof such leftfield business classics as The Empty Raincoat. Next to Storr’sanalysis of Churchill, most books about leadership seem distinctlytwo-dimensional.HiroshimaJohnHerseyPublisher: PenguinPrice: £7.00ISBN 014118437XThebook in a paragraphUSjournalist John Hersey’s account of the first atomic attack (which killed100,000) will leave you moved, appalled and yet, strangely, uplifted. Followinga handful of survivors of the world’s first nuclear bomb, Hersey tells anastonishing, but never simplistic, story containing more dramatic tension thanmost thrillers and more insight into humanity than many serious novels.HRrelevanceAcalamity of such magnitude doesn’t seem so unlikely after September 11. Andmuch of the rhetoric about what might happen in such a disaster seems to bebased on the assumption that ordinary people will simply panic. Yet Hersey’sbook, while emphasising the human destruction wreaked by the dropping of theatom bomb called Enola Gay, is even more powerful testimony to the incredibleresilience of the human spirit. Theunthinkable had just happened, but after mere seconds or minutes, the survivorsturned to the urgent business of helping each other and locating relatives andfriends. Unable to rely on the authorities, thousands performed acts of immenseheroism and altruism. Only later, the immediate crisis over, did manyexperience what we now call post-traumatic stress disorder. Itwould be trite to draw a simple lesson from this catastrophe, a point the bookitself eloquently makes. Yet in an era where the very idea of the ‘common good’sounds ironic, the heroism recounted here is genuinely inspiring. The book isfull of evil, the kind of evil chronicled daily in the media, but there’s goodhere too, displayed in the deadliest, most difficult circumstances.Thebottom lineTheperfect antidote to all those books in which business leaders congratulatethemselves on their heroic climb to the top.IndecentExposureDavidMcClintickPublisher: ColumbusPrice: £10.95ISBN 0-86287-010-0Thebook in a paragraphNotto be confused with Indecent Proposal (the film where Demi Moore gets $1m tosleep with Robert Redford), this is an incredibly readable, fly-on-the-wallaccount of one of the Hollywood’s biggest scandals – Columbia Pictures producerDavid Begelman defrauds the studio yet the parent company stands by him, to thedisgust of Columbia’s chief executive and many other senior managers. In itsway, the Begelman affair is even more incredible than the recent tales ofcorporate misdeeds.HRrelevanceThehuman mechanics of a power struggle between a chief exec who wants to do theright thing and a board that would prefer a cover up wrongdoing are laid barehere. Written by a Wall Street Journal reporter, the book details theastonishing fashion in which a $10,000 embezzlement paralysed a company. Columbia,like many other corporations confronted with skulduggery, is in denial and paysfor its refusal to penalise a popular, successful yet unethical executive. Insome ways, the book is more frightening than any account of Enron because thedirectors and managers are not freaks, yet they almost wreck the company. Theevasions, the U-turns, the way the issue of dealing with malfeasance issubsumed into a wider struggle, all seem horribly plausible.Thebottom lineAchilling cautionary tale, this is a more accurate (and insightful) indictmentof US corporate life gone awry than Oliver Stone’s Wall Street.TheOfficeRickyGervais and Stephen MerchantPublisher: BBCPrice: £9.99ISBN 0563488476Thebook in a paragraph”DavidBrent is a sad idiot going through a mid-life crisis and suffering a job he’snot proud of.” Or so says Ricky Gervais the creator and player of the UK’smost infamous fictional boss. Don’t worry, the man who wants to be the RupertMurdoch of paper merchanting, or of Slough, will be back, if not for a fullseries then for a TV movie. One of the many things that makes this sitcomcompulsive viewing is that, like Fawlty Towers in the 1970s, it held up adistorting mirror to the British workplace.HRrelevanceThemotivational speech which closes to Tina Turner’s Simply The Best, the lipservice to (and fatal undermining of) policies against racism and sexism in theworkplace… the manager who has regurgitated all the business books he’s everread… these are painfully and amusingly familiar. Theterrifying truth is that, while HR departments are doing their utmost toimprove the workplace, almost every company has a manager like the Brentmeisterwho can shatter morale by saying ‘Morning all’. Hopefully, this series shouldensure that no company ever dares use Simply The Best (or, for that matter,Search For The Hero Inside Yourself) as a theme for a staff conference everagain.Thebottom lineDavidBrent is fast becoming the most famous British manager since Richard Bransonand Basil Fawlty.last_img read more

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first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Interview: Founder of new hybrid explains how he outfoxed his bigger competition previous nextAgencies & PeopleInterview: Founder of new hybrid explains how he outfoxed his bigger competitionFounder of HouseFox.co.uk Neil Urch says his mix of traditional and hybrid models has delivered profitability in just 18 months, unlike other hybrids.Nigel Lewis13th November 201901,044 Views The founder of a growing hybrid estate agency that The Negotiator highlighted last week has revealed more details about his business HouseFox.This includes how its success is based on pick-and-mixing parts of the Purplebricks model with traditional high street agency.Co-founder Neil Urch says two years ago he was working for a local agency and noticed how few people visited the branch.“Those who walked in were holiday makers but the serious buyers were getting in touch by email and phone after receiving Rightmove and Zoopla alerts,” he says.“So I looked at the Purplebricks model and saw how much money was being chucked at them and thought they must be doing something right.”Urch (pictured, left) says he didn’t like the way many hybrid agents charge for all their ‘extra’ services like viewings but did embrace using self-employed local agents who work from home.And he decided to keep customer communications via telephone and not just online, and also rejected the standard hybrid fees model.“I looked at charging half up front and half on completion and was surprised to find that no one else was doing this,” he says. “It’s a great model because it means that when I walk out of a house with an instruction, I’ve still got an incentive to get it to completion.”GambleUrch says he then took a gamble, left a good job and that so far it’s been an ‘amazing success’. The estate agency, which is based out of a ‘hub’ in Weston-super-Mare, has reached profitability years before he and his business partner though it would.After initially launching ‘on a shoestring’ 18 months ago in Weston-super-Mare, the business launched into Portishead and Clevedon six months ago and this new territory is starting to take off too.Urch says he wants to expand the business in another area and then eventually open up in the region’s main city, Bristol.  He’s also been approached by several large conveyancers and mortgage lenders to partner with HouseFox.“My business plan says that once I’ve got five areas all making money then we’ve proved the model,” he says.HouseFox Neil Urch hybrid estate agent Rightmove Zoopla November 13, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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first_img Training & Education Strike aircraft from the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group have dropped 1,134 pieces of ordnance in support of Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR), more than any aircraft carrier involved in the operation to defeat ISIL.Truman and embarked Carrier Air Wing 7 began strike operations in support of Operation Inherent Resolve upon their arrival to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in late December. “Warfighting is the priority, and I am very proud of the effort and team work it took to reach this milestone. That said it is more about keeping the pressure on ISIL. The weapons delivered are obviously critical in that endeavor,” said Rear Adm. Bret Batchelder, commander, Carrier Strike Group 8. To date, Carrier Strike Group 8 has employed over 580 Tons of explosives on ISIL targets and have disrupted and destroyed weapons storage facilities, training facilities, and financial infrastructure. “While we have seen major accomplishments during our time here, to include this one, the goal has not changed. We have driven ISIL out of over 40 percent of their controlled territory and will continue to pursue them. We will deny them safe haven to operate, and ultimately, the coalition will defeat them,” Batchelder said.The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group is deployed in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations supporting OIR strike operations in Iraq and Syria, maritime security operations, and theater security cooperation efforts in the region.[mappress mapid=”17791″]Image: US Navy Share this article View post tag: Harry S. Truman Back to overview,Home naval-today Harry S Truman CSG completes major OIR milestone center_img View post tag: US Navy Harry S Truman CSG completes major OIR milestone April 26, 2016last_img read more

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first_imgTango music belongs, for most of us, in a completely different world. It conjures images of dark cafés, hot latin summers and a dance that was construed so fierce and sexual that attempts were made to ban it by US congress and the Vatican early last century. When asked how tango music is supposed to sound, most people will probably end up humming the same tune, accompanied in their head by the common trio of violin, guitar and double bass. The famous side of the genre is strident and strong, managing a sense of musical improvisation within a rigid atmosphere to accommodate dance. It in this style that Tango has featured in so many celluloid dance scenes – Scent of a Woman, Moulin Rouge!, Shall We Dance?, and Chicago, to name but a few. Yet the genre also encompasses a lesser-heard, subtle, overtly romantic style that is driven more by melody than rhythm.What few people know about are the revisions that tango has undergone; those same emotions finding new expressions. The earliest, more famed traditions were musically based around portable instruments – thus the violin, guitar, flute trios, that characterized it in its origins. Eventually, the flute was dropped for a double bass and the bandoneón (squeezebox) introduced; and this then blossomed into the ‘standard’ arrangements of double violins, bandoneóns, and a double bass and piano. It was with this arrangement that the genre found its most world-popular expression in the 1920s, with Carlos Gardel, developing the sung tradition: tango-canción. And so the Golden Age began.But with the 1950s came Ástor Piazzolla, and with him the Tango Nuevo, ‘New Tango’. Tango was, at this point, a very important part of Argentina’s national identity, and Piazzolla messed with it, controversially fusing tango and jazz, sometimes echoing the harmonic sophistication of Bach – one of his early idols. He introduced completely new arrangements to the genre, frequently using the electric guitar but also writing for symphony and string orchestras. His genre-breaking ideas were, I believe the height of Tango’s evolution. And then Neo-Tango has, in the last decade, become very big. It is the lovechild of the Tango Nuevo and the booming age of electronica. If you enjoy the feel of both of these genres, you may love this – coupling subtlety and energy with sophistication and thought, Gotan Project, and their album Lunático, have been very much at the core of this movement. Explore this genre. It’s good. It’s very good.By James Goldspinklast_img read more

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first_imgA Lanarkshire baker has been fined £60,000 by HMRC over false repayment claims.Plains-based Derek Higgins sold his bakery business, Higgins and Cushley, which had its headquarters in nearby Coatbridge, in May 2011. But between 2011 and 2013 he continued to submit repayment claims (10 in total) to HMRC as though the business were still trading.Higgins appeared for sentencing at Airdrie Sheriff Court this week – he was given 160 hours’ community service to be completed within six months.He avoided a custodial sentence but was given a 16-week Restriction of Liberty Order – which places him under curfew between 7pm and 7am – and a compensation order for £60,000 to be paid to HMRC by March 2017.At an earlier hearing in November he pleaded guilty to being knowingly concerned in the fraudulent evasion of VAT, contrary to the VAT Act 1994, according to HMRC.Cheryl Burr, assistant director of HMRC’s fraud investigation service, said: “Higgins deliberately set out to create a false paper trail, manipulating a system that exists for the benefit of legitimate companies.“This was theft, stealing money he was not entitled to, money that’s needed to fund our vital public services.”last_img read more

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first_imgThirteen-poundbabies may make headlines, but they aren’t the norm. In fact, U.S. infants aregetting smaller, according to Harvard researchers at the Harvard Pilgrim Health CareInstitute’s Department of Population Medicine, an affiliate of Harvard MedicalSchool (HMS). Their findings, published in the February issue of Obstetrics &Gynecology, suggest that birth weights in this country have declined during thepast 15 years.The studyanalyzed data on birth weight, maternal and neonatal characteristics, obstetriccare, and other trends from the National Center for Health Statistics NatalityData Set, looking at 36,827,828 U.S. babies born at full-term between 1990 and2005. Birth weight — a combination of fetal growth and length of gestation — wasrecorded in grams. The investigators teased out certain factors, including themother’s age, race or ethnicity, education level, marital status, and tobaccouse, as well as the amount of weight the women gained during pregnancy and howearly in pregnancy they received prenatal care. They also considered thewomen’s risk of conditions such as hypertension and use of obstetric proceduressuch as induction of labor and Caesarean delivery.Their findingscame as a surprise. “Previous studies have shown that birth weights haveincreased steadily during the past half century,” said Emily Oken, an HMS assistant professor of population medicine. “We expected to seea continuation of those increases.” Higher birth weights have beenattributed in part to women’s increasing age and weight and decreased smoking.Instead, Oken andher colleagues found that birth weights had decreased by an average of 52 grams(1.83 ounces) between 1990 and 2005. Decreases were especially notable after1995.In contrast toprevious research findings, birth weights fell even further in infants born toa subset of women considered to be at low risk for small babies. Mothers whowere white, well-educated, married, didn’t smoke, received early prenatal care,and delivered vaginally with no complications hadbabies who weighed an average of 79 grams (2.78 ounces) less at birth duringthe study period.The causes ofthis decline remain unclear. In addition to declines in birth weight, averagegestation length among these full-term births also dropped by more than twodays. “A logical conclusion might be that trends in obstetric management, suchas greater use of Caesarean delivery and induction of labor, mightaccount for these decreases in birth weight and gestation length,” said Oken.“However, our analysis showed that this was not the case.”While the declinemay simply represent a reversal of previous increases in birth weights, it mayalso be cause for concern. Babies born small not only face short-termcomplications such as increased likelihood of requiring intensive care afterbirth and even higher risk of death, but they may also beat higher riskfor chronic diseases in adulthood.Future researchmay identify factors not included in the current data that might contribute tolower birth weight, such as trends in mothers’ diets, physical activity,stress, and exposure to environmental toxins. “There’s still a lot we don’tknow about the causes of low birth weight,”said Oken. “Moreresearch needs to be done.”The research wassupported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.last_img read more

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first_imgIn honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, members of the Saint Mary’s community gathered together to host a panel remembering Dr. King’s message of fostering an inclusive community titled “First Generation College Students.” “We are doing this in honor of Dr. King and his message to include everybody,” Tamara Taylor, assistant director of Student Involvement and Multicultural Affairs, said. “I am a first-generation college student and during my time in school I often felt excluded and forgotten. It is important to recognize the different struggles individuals are going through on campus.” In addition to Taylor, the panel also included other faculty members, all of who consider themselves first-generation college students.   Topics varied from financial aid and parental support to mentorship advice and campus involvement, but each panelist offered her own experience. “My father eventually went to college after he served in World War II and had access to the GI Bill,” Jan Pilarski, a professor in the Justice Education Program, said. “His college experience was not typical and he could not offer me much advice in terms of my education. He pushed for me to be a doctor and it became a struggle for both me and him when I decided to step off that path.” This theme of dealing with friends and family after starting the college experience was expressed by more than one panelist. Bettina Spencer, a professor from the psychology department, also alluded to how different her home in Detroit felt after she started her undergraduate degree at a small liberal arts college in New York. “It was a struggle,” Spencer said. “In fact, it still is a struggle. I went to college and sometimes felt as though I didn’t fit in there, and then I would come home and realize I no longer fully fit in there either. I had to redo my boundaries with certain family members.” Being a first-generation college student is hard enough, but Stacy Davis, a professor in the religious studies and gender and women’s studies departments, said being a scholarship student added to the difficulties. “It is a very scary thing to be a scholarship student at a school with a lot of money,” Davis said. “Academics at the college level are a whole different world. I was the only non-white student out of 60 students in the honors program and everyday was a challenge. It was not until my junior year that I met non-middle class students and truly felt as though I found my people and niche.” All four panelists agreed that the first two years of their college experiences were the most difficult because they did not find a community to which they belonged. “I had a very different experience in the fact that I became a teen mom and then decided to attend college,” Taylor said. “I struggled with the workload and loans. It was not until I became a McNair Scholar at Central Michigan University my junior year that I felt mentored and included in the campus community.” This idea of mentorship and involvement were the two key points each panelist pinpointed as a turning point in their college careers. “I had two very good mentors,” Davis said. “They both taught me that if you are not having fun then the major isn’t right for you.” Each panelist attributed her time as being a first-generation college student to a unique perspective she can now bring to the table in her job.  “After a difficult moment in one of my classes during my undergrad, I had to ask myself the question, ‘Is this threat or a challenge?’ I decided it was a challenge and from then on when I come across difficult situations I ask myself the same question,” Spencer said. The panelists agreed it was these difficult moments of overcoming hardships that led them to appreciate their undergraduate degree. “My advice to offer you is to circle the graduation date,” Davis said. “Keep that date right in front of your face. Once you cross that finish line it is well worth it. Out of all the degrees hanging on my wall I am most proud of my undergraduate one.”last_img read more

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Longview Daily News:In a potentially fatal blow to the Longview coal project, a federal judge Tuesday upheld the state of Washington’s denial of a key water quality permit for the $680 million export dock.Judge Robert Bryan of U.S. District Court in Tacoma dismissed claims by Lighthouse Resources and BNSF Railway that the permit denial preempted the Interstate Commerce Commission Termination Act and the Ports and Waterways Safety Act. Bryan found the companies failed to prove that the federal acts should have barred the state Department of Ecology from denying the water permit.Millennium began the permitting process for the coal terminal in 2012. The state denied its application for a water quality certificate in September 2017, pointing to “significant unavoidable adverse impacts” outlined in the Final Environmental Impact Assessment for the project. The state also said it didn’t have reasonable assurance that the terminal would meet applicable water quality standards.Lighthouse Resources sued Gov. Jay Inslee’s administration over the decision in January. Six coal-producing states — Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Utah, Kansas and Nebraska — intervened in the suit on behalf of Lighthouse and the railroad, alleging that Washington was blocking interstate commerce by blocking the project.Bryan’s decision is another in a string of setbacks for Millennium, which is in other legal tangles with the state over the project. In addition, last month the company cut 15 percent of its Longview staff and announced the retirement of its CEO, Bill Chapman.The terminal would be the largest on the U.S. West Coast and would ship 44 million tons of Rocky Mountain coal to Asia, requiring eight round trips to the terminal site at the old Reynolds Metals Co. aluminum plant. Millennium says it would create 1,000 construction jobs to build and about 130 workers to operate at full development.More: Federal judge dismisses more Millennium claims against state Proposed Washington state coal export terminal loses another court battlelast_img read more

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first_imgEIA: Renewables could overtake U.S. gas generation by 2034 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Platts:Renewable energy is projected not only to crowd out coal-fired and nuclear generation but also to overtake natural gas as the dominant fuel for power generation by 2045, according to the main reference case the U.S. Energy Information Administration put forth Jan. 29.Gas-fired combined-cycle generation capacity is expected to be “added steadily throughout the projection period to meet rising demand,” the EIA said in its 2020 Annual Energy Outlook. However, the reference case shows gas use for electricity dipping slightly to 36% of the power mix in 2050, compared with 37% in 2019. A year earlier, the outlook saw gas growing from 34% of the mix in 2018 to 39% by 2050.The agency’s reference case assumes cost reductions for renewables will gradually taper off. But the EIA’s “low renewables cost” case assumes renewables achieve overnight capital costs in 2050 that are 40% lower than in the reference case.Under that scenario, renewable generation inches ahead of gas in 2034 and continues an upward trajectory toward providing nearly 3 trillion kWh of electricity by 2050. Gas-fired generation, in that case, remains flat, supplying between 1.5 trillion and 1.6 trillion kWh throughout the projection period. The case assuming lower costs for renewables expects gas-fired generation to start leveling off in the 2020s.Gas prices in the reference case stay below $4/MMBtu through 2035, with abundant lower-cost resources, mostly in Permian Basin tight oil plays. Across all cases, the outlook projects gas production will exceed consumption, enabling increased exports even though production growth slows to less than 1% a year in the 2020s in the reference case.Gas consumption slows after reaching 31.9 Tcf in 2020 and stays flat through 2030, then rises 1% a year with higher power sector and industrial sector use. The industrials category, which wraps in LNG feedgas, is the biggest consumer after 2021.[Maya Weber and Jasmin Melvin]More: EIA: Gas-fired power to lose out to renewables, even with sustained gas outputlast_img read more

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