May 11, 2021
  • 5:50 am Distinguishing East and West Antarctic sediment sources using the Pb isotope composition of detrital K-feldspar
  • 5:45 am Topographic shelf waves control seasonal melting near Antarctic Ice Shelf grounding lines
  • 5:56 am Harris scores 20, Nuggets rally in 4th and beat Jazz 103-88
  • 5:54 am Mitchell scores 46, Jazz beat Nuggets 118-108
  • 5:51 am 49ers have the NFL’s first-ever support dog

first_imgAviation columnist Maxim Pyadushkin told to Aviation Week & Space Technology that Russian company Phasotron-NIIR was about to develop simplified version of phased array radar Zhuk-AE for prospective deck-based helicopter Ka-52K which is to be stationed on Mistral-class landing ships imported from France.The helicopter radar should have mass only 80 kg (compare to 275 kg of airplane version based on multirole fighter MiG-35). Being equipped with such light-weight radar, helicopters would be capable to carry antiship guided missiles Kh-31 and Kh-35. The company plans to produce the first prototype of that radar in 2012.Executive director of holding company Russian Helicopters Dmitry Petrov told to the American magazine that development of Ka-52K had been already started. The first sample is to be constructed in 2014, i.e. by the time when Russia would receive the first Mistral. The ships will be armed with mixed air wings consisting of attack helicopters Ka-52K and multipurpose helicopters Ka-29. Reportedly, Phasotron-NIIR has completed testing of mechanically scanned radar Arbalet for Ka-52 helicopters currently in service. First radars have been already delivered to Progress plant (Arseniev, Far East) which assembles Ka-52. First 4 helicopters were handed over to Russian Air Force in May 2011.The company’s chief designer Yury Guskov expressed his disagreement with Indian commission as of MMRCA tender. Russian fighter MiG-35 competed in the tender, although failed due to allegedly low performance of Zhuk-AE radar. Prototype radar did meet India’s requirements and detected air targets at the range of 130 km. Take note, the prototype radar participated in the India’s tender had only 680 transceivers, while serially produced radar has 1 016 transceivers which increases detection range of air targets up to 250 km.[mappress]Source: rusnavy, August 22, 2011; View post tag: Equip Russia: Phasotron-NIIR to Equip Ka-52K Helicopters with Zhuk-AE Radars August 22, 2011 View post tag: radars View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Helicopters Back to overview,Home naval-today Russia: Phasotron-NIIR to Equip Ka-52K Helicopters with Zhuk-AE Radars View post tag: Navycenter_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: Ka-52K Equipment & technology Share this article View post tag: Phasotron-NIIR View post tag: Zhuk-AE View post tag: Russialast_img read more

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first_imgA murder investigation has been launched into the death of 42-year-old Adrian Greenwood, who was found dead in the hallway of his home in East Oxford on Thursday.Police were called to his three-storey property on Iffley Road at 3pm, after a cleaner found a man inside the hallway.A post-mortem yesterday confirmed the cause of death as multiple stab wounds to the chest and neck.Thames Valley Police believe these wounds were inflicted with a bladed object, but they are yet to recover a murder weapon.They also believe that an altercation took place in the hallway of the house and that Mr. Greenwood died after a “vicious and sustained attack,” in which the offender may also have obtained injuries.A 26-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder and is currently in custody.An onlooker, who saw the arrest yesterday, told Cherwell, “I was walking up the high street at around 18:15 when I saw a small grey car barreling through the high speed with the car horn blaring, closely followed by a police car. Both cars were coming from Cowley. I walked past Quod a few minutes later and saw the two cars parked in the middle of the road. Two policemen, one plain-clothed, were speaking to a man who had a couple of bloody cuts across his cheek.”Detective superintendent Chris Ward, head of Thames Valley Police major crime unit, commented, “We are keeping an open mind in terms of the motive and whilst we have already made an arrest in connection with this investigation, I anticipate further arrests will be made as the investigation continues.”Mr. Greenwood read Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Christ Church before embarking on a career as an antiques dealer, according to his website.On the same site he described himself as a “historian, biographer, author and art dealer with a particular interest in nineteenth century British military history”.He retired four years ago to focus on his writing, producing hundreds of articles since about antiques.A blue tent was erected outside the house, whilst Forensic teams searched through bins, hedges and drains along the street.Hugo Kent-Egan, an Oxford student who lives nearby, commented, “I remember seeing the police tape closing off the section of Iffley Road when I was cycling into college yesterday and wondering what was going on, only saw the story just a few hours ago.“Obviously there are very few details about the incident such as motive and so on, but it was really shocking to read the article and recognise the picture of his house on Iffley Road, just a 5 minute walk from where we live. For something like that to happen virtually on our doorsteps seems very surreal and out of place.“Considering that to most people Oxford seems a very safe and fun place to live and that the only crime I’ve really ever come across this year in Cowley are bicycle thefts or burglaries, something like this really jars with people sense of safety and will perhaps make me more wary this term.”Iffley Road reopened last night after officers were seen removing grey Vauxhall Vectra from the property.However the three-storey house and three nearby properties remained cordoned off this morning.A spokesman said Mr. Greenwood’s next of kin had been informed, although he is yet to be formally identified.UPDATE (April 10 2016): Man arrested by police on the High Street released without charge by police.last_img read more

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first_imgThese protests came as part of climate strikes all across the UK, and the rest of the world. Thousands descended on central London to hear activists speak, as well as Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn who described himself as ‘absolutely delighted’ by the protests.  This morning school students across Oxford and the surround area left class to march at another climate change strike held in the city centre. “It is a wonderful tie-in to all the other things which are happening around the planet at the same time”. In what was the city’s seventh Youth Strike 4 Climate event, hundreds gathered to make known their opposition to global pollution and widespread damage to the environment.  Oxford MP Anneliese Dodds, MP for Oxford East, said: “I think it is really humbling to see a huge number of young people here today and they are very clear that we need to act now. We cannot keep putting action off”. Chris Church of Oxford Friends of the Earth said: “This is the largest environmental demonstration Oxford has ever seen. However, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said “every child” should be in school. He added that “they should be learning, they shouldn’t be bunking off and it’s very irresponsible for people to encourage children to do so”. Demonstrations have been held in every continent, and millions are thought to have attended climate strike events across the world.last_img read more

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first_imgOn a recent family trip to Milan, I was presented with a freshly baked Pastiera Napoletana from my wife’s cousin. Wow! I couldn’t wait to get back to Cinnamon Square and try making this one. So I nipped to the local Ipercoop supermarket and purchased some grano cotto (cooked wheat) and brought this back in my suitcase to save time when I got home naturally the kids think I’m bonkers!This delicious ricotta cheese and grain pie is a very old Neapolitan speciality for the Easter season. Pastiera is best enjoyed one to three days after it is baked, so the different flavours can blend together. It produces a fantastic citrus-fresh flavour and aroma with a mixture of textures coming from the crisp pastry, ricotta cheesecake and soft wheatgrains.Pastiera is traditionally made on Good Friday, to be eaten as a dessert on Easter Sunday, and each family hands down a ’secret’ recipe from one generation to the next. Today, as for hot cross buns in the UK, it is available all year round in Italy.They keep for about three days in the refrigerator before the filling starts to show signs of contracting and/or cracking. I think they actually taste great warmed up but you decide.In our recipe we use prepared grano cotto or you can cook pre-soaked whole grain in water or milk, but this is a long process. The preparation comprises two steps:l Part-baking the sweet pastry shellsl Filling, topping and baking the tarts.Pastiera NapoletanaMakes 15x45g tartlets plus decoration (110mm cases)Tart casesIngredient%gBread flour50150Plain flour 50150Butter75225Caster sugar38114Ground almonds38114Egg22661. Mix the flour, ground almonds, butter and sugar together until a crumble.2. Mix in the eggs until a smooth paste avoid over-mixing.3. Line foil tart cases, but save some pastry for decorating the tops, and bake at 180ºC until just showing signs of taking colour approximately 10 minutes.4. Remove from oven and allow to cool.5. While cooling, prepare the filling.FillingIngredientgRicotta cheese500Grano cotto (Wheat, water, salt), drained500Whole egg100Caster sugar100Mixed peel100Lemon rind and juice1 lemonOrange rind and juice1 orangeGround cinnamon51. Combine all the ingredients together in a bowl (A) with a beater until homogeneous do not overmix (B).2. Scoop into part-baked tart case until level with rim (C).3. Roll out some pastry and cut strips with pastry wheels (D). Place these strips of pastry on top of the filling for decoration (E).4. Bake at 170ºC for 15-20 minutes.5. Lightly dust top with icing sugar (F).last_img read more

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first_imgLoad remaining images After spending a few weeks in the Midwest and Northeast, Phish kicked off a West Coast tour last weekend with two nights at The Gorge Amphitheatre in George, WA. After a fun-filled day off that saw guitarist Trey Anastasio perform with street musicians and Mike Gordon collaborate with Phil Lesh & Friends at Terrapin Crossroads, the band regrouped for the first of three nights at the storied Bill Graham Civic Auditorium. The relatively intimate venue (capacity is 7,000, compared to the Gorge’s 20,000) is always a favorite destination along Phish’s summer tours, and the band did not disappoint in their return visit.Phish opened the show with “Martian Monster,” getting loose and funky to kick off a solid show throughout. With jams like “Halley’s Comet” > “46 Days” in the first frame, fans were getting down from the getgo. Slower choices like “Sugar Shack,” “Roggae” and “Daniel Saw The Stone” came next, but the latter segued into an all-out “Divided Sky.” “Ocelot” followed, with “Ya Mar” containing the biggest jam of the night. The band again swapped instruments, with Anastasio taking on the Marimba Lumina, before Gordon and keyboardist Page McConnell swapped instruments. The silliness belies the band’s happiness for performance, and a rocking “Possum” capped off a great first set.The second set was loose and funky, with a set-opening “Golden Age” > “Twist” to get things rocking for a full 20 minutes of Phish jamming. The band then brought out “My Sweet One” for a little upbeat fun, and took that into Fuego track “The Line.” After a free-for-all “Simple,” Phish played their first cover of Allen Toussaint’s “Sneaking Sally Through The Alley” of the year. The tune kept Bill Graham rocking with 18 minutes of pure funk- the longest jam of the night- before “Limb By Limb” followed with its high energy grooves. “Slave to the Traffic Light” put a cap on a full hour-plus of continuous music. With more time remaining, Phish brought out their second tour debut of the night, Los Lobos’ “When The Circus Comes.” The slow-dance number kept fans smiling, but it was “Run Like An Antelope” that had the final notes of the evening. What a show!Phish returns to the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium tonight for round two of three. Check out the full setlist form Phish.net, below.Setlist: Phish at Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, CA – 7/18/16Set 1: Martian Monster, Halley’s Comet > 46 Days, Sugar Shack, Roggae, Daniel Saw the Stone > Divided Sky, Ocelot > Ya Mar[1], PossumSet 2: Golden Age > Twist > My Sweet One > The Line > Simple > Sneakin’ Sally Through the Alley > Limb By Limb > Slave to the Traffic LightEncore: When the Circus Comes, Run Like an Antelope[1] Trey on Marimba Lumina; Mike on guitar; Page on bass.Notes: Ya Mar featured Trey on Marimba Lumina, Mike on guitar, and Page on bass. Simple contained a Magilla tease from Page.Photos by Jeffrey Dupuis; full gallery can be seen below.last_img read more

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first_imgEarlier in the year, an all-star reggae group, Natural Selectah, was born in Denver, Colorado. Featuring a revolving lineup of musicians, the band makes use of the many touring musicians who make the Mile Hile City their home, with the band previously featuring members from Thievery Corporation, The Motet, Pimps Of Joytime, Pretty Lights Live Band, The New Mastersounds, DubSkin, Euforquesta, SunSquabi, and more. Outside of the all-star lineup that Natural Selectah frequently boasts, one of the best aspects of the group’s shows is their covers of non-reggae songs and give them the full reggae treatment.The Nth Power Crew Welcomes Members of Antibalas, Break Science, And More For Reggae Night [Full Audio]Yesterday, Natural Selectah released a video of the group covering the Hall & Oates classic, “I Can’t Go For That.” Featuring vocalist Haile Supreme front and center, the reggae side project’s lineup for this dubby cover of Hall & Oates also sees fine performances by some of our favorite musicians from Thievery, The Motet, Pimps Of Joytime, and more. You can check out the video for yourself below, which was recorded live at the Denver recording studio, Scanhope Sound. You can also catch Natural Selectah live on September 20th at Cervantes’ Masterpiece Ballroom when the crew opens for Shaggy, with tickets available here. read more

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first_imgIt was a change for the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum. In a space that has hosted enough leaders and politicians to rival CNN, suddenly there was song.Negro spirituals by the group DivinePURPOSE filled the hall Dec. 4 as Henry Louis Gates Jr. led the ninth annual Du Bois Medal ceremony, the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute‘s highest honor, which goes to individuals whose work has made a significant contribution to African and African-American culture. Gates, director of the institute and the Alphonse Fletcher Jr. University Professor, called the event, which was co-sponsored by the Institute of Politics, “the biggest of the year.”The music was just part of the uplifting but poignant commemoration, sobered by the death a month ago of one of the honorees, Cambridge storytelling legend Hugh M. “Brother Blue” Hill ’48. Blue was a decades-long fixture around Boston and Cambridge, renowned for his tales, which he spun while wearing his trademark bright blue clothing and a butterfly necklace. Blue’s widow, Ruth Edmonds Hill, accepted his medal for what Gates described as “his desire to build a better world, one story at a time.”Writer and journalist Calvin Trillin was on hand to present the award to his friend, journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault, whom he first met in Georgia, when Hunter-Gault was 19 and “already sassy,” he said.Hunter-Gault and Hamilton E. Holmes were the first blacks admitted to the University of Georgia in 1961, ending segregation there, amid riots and controversy.“I was a reporter then, covering the Civil Rights struggle,” Trillin recalled, “and I noticed that, even at that age, she had the ability to stand outside what was happening to her and observe it ironically.”Trillin thanked Hunter-Gault for his “education in the South.” He said, “I thought I had a pretty good understanding of segregation,” but was ultimately schooled when Hunter-Gault informed him of an unpleasant train ride she’d had, and Trillin replied, “I thought that was supposed to be a great train?” Hunter-Gault responded, “Not where we have to sit.”“I realized I hadn’t understood much about segregation until then,” said Trillin. “I’m happy to say that, partly because of her efforts, she can sit anywhere she pleases.”“I actually feel quite at home,” said Hunter-Gault, accepting her medal. “I feel as though I am a child of Du Bois, and I will wear this proudly.”William Julius Wilson, Lewis P. and Linda L. Geyser University Professor, introduced another award winner, New York Times op-ed columnist Bob Herbert, saying that Herbert strove to “arouse the consciousness of the masses with his stories on social justice,” and labeled him a “humble man, and a great listener.”“Many of Bob Herbert’s articles are about people in trouble, often through no fault of their own, and their misfortunes are not rare,” said Wilson. “And Herbert insightfully traces these problems to abuses of power and social injustice, not only in this country, but around the world.”Herbert argued his own humility, joking that newspaper columnists need “the arrogance to rant and rave 100 or more times a year.”“But I do feel humble tonight,” he said, noting that his father — just one generation back — could’ve never have held Herbert’s jobs.Also honored were philanthropists Daniel and Joanna S. Rose, who helped to fund many educational and cultural institutions, including the Du Bois Institute, where they are members of the National Advisory Board; Frank H. Pearl, the Perseus Books founder; and Princeton University President Shirley M. Tilghman, who was honored for her devotion to African-American studies, which led to establishing the Center for African American Studies at Princeton in 2006.Pulitzer Prize-winning author Annette Gordon-Reed recounted how she came to know lawyer and political adviser Vernon E. Jordan Jr., another medal winner, when he contacted her to help write his memoir “Vernon Can Read!”“The truth, of course, is that Vernon Jordan helped change my life, even before we first met,” said Gordon-Reed.Jordan’s legal career began with his clerk work in the landmark desegregation case that admitted Hunter-Gault to the University of Georgia.“Vernon Jordan has been an extraordinary presence in American history for nearly half a century,” said Gates. “He has guided us all to a much better place.”Jordan said that in his senior year at a “dilapidated, segregated” Georgia high school, he was offered admission to Dartmouth College by the president of the Atlanta-based alumni association.“He told me, ‘We want you to go to Dartmouth College, get a good education, and then come back to Atlanta and be a Booker T. Washington for your people.’”Washington and Du Bois disagreed on the strategies for how best to attain progress for blacks. Washington pushed for blacks to advance their own lives but to accept discrimination; Du Bois argued against that aspect, and helped to found the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.Jordan did not accept the Dartmouth offer, instead attending DePauw University. “I am a W.E.B. Du Bois man,” he said. “That’s why this medal means so much to me.”To view the event.last_img read more

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first_imgWilliam F. Lee, A.B. ’72, will become the Harvard Corporation’s senior fellow next summer, succeeding Robert D. Reischauer, A.B. ’63, the University announced today.Reischauer, president emeritus of the Urban Institute, and Robert E. Rubin, A.B. ’60, former U.S. treasury secretary and now co-chair of the Council on Foreign Relations, each plan to step down on June 30, 2014, after 12 years of service, consistent with the norms recently adopted by the Corporation.Reischauer, senior fellow since 2010, has played a leading role in advancing the set of historic governance reforms approved in December 2010.Lee, a member of the Corporation since 2010 and a distinguished intellectual property expert at the law firm WilmerHale, was elected by his Corporation colleagues to become senior fellow as of July 1, 2014.*Reischauer, who grew up in Cambridge and Belmont, Mass., before graduating from Harvard College in 1963, joined the Corporation in 2002 after a six-year term on Harvard’s Board of Overseers. Along with President Drew Faust, he guided the wide-ranging review that led to recent years’ governance reforms, intended to expand the Corporation’s capacity and intensify its focus on issues of long-term strategy and policy. The changes included expanding the Corporation from seven to 13 members and creating new committees on facilities and capital planning, finance, and governance.“I have long treasured my relationship with Harvard,” said Reischauer. “It has been a particular privilege to work with Harvard’s presidents and my Corporation and Overseer colleagues to strengthen the University during these times of unprecedented challenge, promise, and institutional change. Together we have sought to ensure that Harvard continues to be the leader in a rapidly changing environment. The world needs the best possible education and research, and that makes the aspirations and creativity of Harvard’s remarkable faculty, students, and staff all the more crucial.”“Bob Reischauer has been a deeply dedicated and extraordinarily effective senior fellow, guiding the Corporation through a time of transformative change,” said Faust. “His legacy, as the senior fellow who did so much to shape and implement our recent governance reforms, will carry on for decades ahead. I’m immensely grateful for his leadership, his insight and counsel, and his unwavering personal support.”Reischauer chairs the Corporation’s governance committee, and is past chair of its finance committee, its committee on shareholder responsibility, and the governing boards’ joint committee on inspection (the University’s audit committee).Now a distinguished institute fellow and president emeritus of the Urban Institute, a nonpartisan economic and social policy research organization in Washington, D.C., Reischauer served as the institute’s president from 2000 to 2012. From 1989 to 1995, he was director of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO). Both before and after his tenure as CBO director, he was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Academy of Social Insurance, Reischauer is a recognized policy expert on the federal budget, Medicare, Social Security, poverty, and welfare. He is one of the two public trustees of the Social Security and Medicare trust funds, was vice chair of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission from 2001 to 2008, and serves on the boards of several educational and nonprofit organizations. He received his master of international affairs degree (1966) and his Ph.D. in economics (1971), both from Columbia.*Rubin, a fellow of Harvard College since 2002, serves on the Corporation’s finance committee and the joint committee on inspection. Like Reischauer, he was a member of the University’s presidential search committee in 2006-07, and he served on the governance review committee in 2010. He also serves on the University’s Global Advisory Council.“Harvard has thrived over decades through a willingness to aim high and to embrace change,” Rubin said. “That outlook will remain crucial, as global competition intensifies and as Harvard seeks to link its Schools and engage complex challenges in novel ways. I have greatly valued my time on the Corporation and the opportunity to serve an institution whose activities and aspirations represent American universities’ immensely important role in the world and the value of higher education for the individual and for society.”“Bob Rubin has constantly enhanced the Corporation’s deliberations with his incisiveness, his commitment to excellence, and his rare mix of perspectives from public service, finance, and global affairs,” said Faust. “He has been a strong voice in encouraging efforts to connect Harvard’s different parts and in pressing to assure that Harvard does all it should to assure its leadership for the long term. I very much appreciate his thoughtful, farsighted service to the University.”Now the co-chair of the Council on Foreign Relations, Rubin served as the nation’s 70th secretary of the treasury from 1995 to 1999. From 1993 to 1995 he was assistant to the president for economic policy and the first director of the National Economic Council. He earlier spent more than 25 years at Goldman, Sachs & Co., where he rose to become co-senior partner and co-chairman from 1990 to 1992. After leaving federal service, he was a member of the board of directors at Citigroup and a senior adviser to the company from 1999 to 2009. He chairs the board of the Local Initiatives Support Corporation, a leading community development support organization, and is co-founder of the Brookings Institution’s Hamilton Project. He also serves on the board of trustees of Mount Sinai Medical Center.A summa graduate of Harvard College in 1960, Rubin received his LL.B. from Yale in 1964. He holds honorary degrees from both Harvard and Yale, among other universities, and is the author of “In an Uncertain World: Tough Choices from Wall Street to Washington” (2003, with Jacob Weisberg).*Lee is a partner and former co-managing partner of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr, one of the nation’s most prominent law firms, with some 1,000 lawyers and 14 offices in the United States, Europe, and Asia. He is a leading intellectual property (IP) litigator who has represented a wide range of technology-focused clients over more than 35 years. His scores of trials and appeals have focused on such diverse matters as smartphones, laser optics, secure Internet communications, pharmaceutical products, medical devices, and genetically engineered food.Among his many honors, Lee has been named one of the country’s 100 most influential lawyers (National Law Journal, 2000, 2006, 2013), outstanding U.S. IP practitioner of the year (Managing IP, 2009, 2013), and one of the nation’s litigators of the year (American Lawyer, 2012).“Bill Lee’s wisdom and humanity, his blend of imagination and pragmatism, and his savvy about organizations and about people make him an exceptionally effective and admirable leader,” said Faust. “His interests, concerns, and relationships range across the University, and he knows that innovation is one of Harvard’s proudest traditions. All of us on the Corporation consider ourselves fortunate to have, in Bill Lee, so worthy a successor to Bob Reischauer.”“I am deeply honored and humbled to have been chosen to serve as senior fellow,” said Lee. “Harvard is the most extraordinary academic institution in the world, and I look forward to working with our president, my fellow Corporation members, and the broader Harvard community to ensure that it remains so. Bob Reischauer has been a wonderful leader, pioneering fundamental changes in our governance. I can only hope that we will build upon all he has accomplished.”A member of Harvard’s Board of Overseers from 2002 to 2008, Lee was chair of the board’s committee on finance, administration, and management; vice chair of its executive committee; and one of the Overseer members of the presidential search committee in 2006-07. He joined the Corporation in 2010 and serves as chair of the Joint Committee on Inspection; he is also a member of the Corporation committees on governance, facilities and capital planning, and shareholder responsibility. He has taught intellectual property litigation at Harvard Law School (HLS), as well as the January problem-solving workshop that HLS introduced in 2010.After graduating from Harvard College in 1972, Lee received his J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Cornell in 1976. He joined the Boston law firm Hale and Dorr and went on to become chair of the litigation department and then managing partner of the firm. He steered the firm’s 2004 merger with Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, then served for seven years as the new firm’s co-managing partner.A fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, Lee maintains an active trial practice nationwide. He has served on numerous advisory committees to federal and state courts, was associate counsel in the Iran-Contra investigation from 1987 to 1989, and in 1988 served as special assistant to the Massachusetts attorney general for purposes of investigating alleged racial bias in the courts.*The Harvard Corporation, formally known as the President and Fellows of Harvard College, is Harvard’s principal fiduciary governing board and the smaller of Harvard’s two boards, the other being the Board of Overseers.Nominations and advice regarding future Corporation appointments may be sent, in confidence, to [email protected]last_img read more

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first_imgAt Wednesday night’s student Senate meeting, the members discussed the core curriculum review with guest speaker Dean John McGreevy of the College of Arts and Letters and voted on the nomination of Janie Goodson, a junior mathematics major, to take over the role of Student Union Treasurer starting Sunday.Student body vice president Matthew Devine opened the meeting and introduced McGreevy, who gave a brief overview of the core curriculum and said the theology requirement would not be eliminated.“I’ve heard a lot about [rumors of the theology requirements’ elimination] recently, and we didn’t anticipate that,” he said. “Everyone knows that theology is central to whatever is going to happen at Notre Dame.” He said the core curriculum review committee wanted student feedback to help them make their decisions and invited senators to bring up their own concerns.“The committee is charged with overseeing a faculty-led, campus-wide — that includes students — review of current general education requirements and deliberate possible changes in the curriculum,” he saidThe University reviews the core curriculum every 10 years. In the past 46 years since the core curriculum was designed, there have been almost no changes.McGreevy said two major concerns he had heard from students were that First Year of Studies was too similar to the high school course lineup and that there was a lack of cohesion among first-year classes.“We hear complaints about what students refer to as ‘grade 13,’” he said. “They sometimes feel the first year at Notre Dame is too much a repetition of what they did in high school.”Most of the concerns of the Senate focused on the lack of electives for many majors, the lack of interest and choice in the required classes and the number of credits required by the core curriculum.Students can voice their opinions regarding the core curriculum at curriculumreview.nd.edu. There will be a student survey and two meetings with students, one with the academic commissioners within the dorms as well as one with students chosen by their departments.After the presentation and discussion about the core curriculum, the Senate voted on the nomination by senior Kristen Parkinson, current Student Union Treasurer, of Janie Goodson to take over the position beginning Sunday and extending for a period of one year. Parkinson presented her nomination and said Goodson would be an excellent choice.“Janie is an extremely talented and motivated individual with the passion, drive and commitment to successfully serve the student body,” Parkinson said.The Senate approved Goodson’s nomination.Student body president Lauren Vidal also announced one dining hall will be open for brunch and dinner each day over spring break.Tags: Core Curriculum, curriculum review, Dining Halls, Notre Dame, Senate, Student Union, Theologylast_img read more

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first_img View Comments She’s still glowing, she’s still crowing and she’s still going 93 years strong! Tony winner Carol Channing has been hoofing, singing, making us laugh, making us cry, and giving us “raspberries” and “jam” for the last 72 (!) years. In honor of the Oscar nominee’s big birthday, we’re saluting the spritely icon with a song. Click below to see Channing get schooled in soul by Teresa Graves on Laugh In. In a giant Afro wig. Obviously, this is from the ’70s. Cheers to your big day, Ms. Channing, and here’s to many, many more!last_img

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