September 1, 2021
  • 9:34 am SBTech announces French market entry
  • 9:33 am Swedish regulator issues sanctions over bonus failures
  • 9:32 am Philippines takes action over undocumented POGOs staff
  • 9:30 am ARC appoints Spincer to lead racing division
  • 9:30 am GambleAware urges action on underage ad exposure

first_imgThis led to a net loss of $3.15bn, compared to a $3.37bn profit in 2019. SJM’s operating expenses came to $7.26bn, with the vast majority, at $7.10bn, in general and administrative expenses. It paid an additional $124.7m in marketing expenses, down 98.0%. Macau casino operator SJM Holdings’ revenue dropped 77.8% to HK$7.51bn (£686.6m/€799.0m/USD$967.9m) amid the disruption around the entire Macau gaming market. After paying $3.37bn in gaming taxes and levies, down 78.3%, SJM was left with $3.94bn, down 77.6%. After $22.5m in tax, down 56.4%, SJM’s post-tax loss was $3.17bn, after a $3.32bn profit the year before. SJM’s flagship Casino Grand Lisboa venue brought in $2.07bn in revenue for the year, down 84.0%. Other SJM-promoted casinos brought in $1.35bn, down 78.5% and revenue from satellite casinos – which are operated through service agreements between SJM and third party promoters – dropped 84.5% to $4.85bn. Tags: SJM Holdings Hotel, catering and other revenue also declined rapidly, by 71.3% to $202.5m.  SJM revenue down 77.8% following Macau restrictions in 2020 Breaking this gaming revenue figure down further, non-VIP table games brought in $5.86bn, a 76.7% decline. VIP gaming revenue dropped 85.1% to $2.04bn and slot revenue declined 68.0% to $379.3m. This resulted in gross revenue of $8.28bn, of which $971.0m was removed through bonuses and commission. Regions: China Macau 24th February 2021 | By Daniel O’Boyle Gaming brought in $7.30bn of SJM’s revenue, down 78.0%.  Gaming revenue in Macau as a whole for 2020 was down 79.3% year-on-year following closures and travel restrictions, though the last restrictions for travellers from mainland China were lifted yesterday. Topics: Casino & games Finance Land-based casino Full year results 2020 The business also incurred a $313.7m loss through the change in fair value of investments, leading to a $3.49bn total comprehensive loss, compared to 2019’s $3.27bn total comprehensive profit. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Full year results 2020 Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

READ MORE

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Executive Council October 2018 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By David PaulsenPosted Oct 19, 2018 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Executive Council passes budget, grants diocesan waivers, praises work of Episcopal Migration Ministries Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Members of Executive Council join hands and sing at the conclusion of a racial reconciliation training Oct. 17 in Chaska, Minnesota. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Chaska, Minnesota] The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council, in its first meeting since the 79th General Convention, spent four days this week focused primarily on orientation, training, leadership appointments and relationship-building at a conference center in suburban Minneapolis.This meeting was light on legislative business, but Executive Council, the church’s governing body during the three years between General Convention meetings, concluded the week by approving a handful of resolutions on financial matters, including the 2019 church budget, the House of Deputies president’s pay and diocesan assessment waivers for six dioceses.Members of Executive Council also received briefings from church officers and staff members during the week, including a bleak assessment of the future of the church’s refugee resettlement work from the Rev. Charles Robertson, the presiding bishop’s canon for ministry beyond the Episcopal Church.Episcopal Migration Ministries, one of nine agencies with federal contracts to resettle refugees in the United States, expects to learn in the coming weeks if its contract will be renewed, at a time when the Trump administration has dramatically reduced the number of refugees being resettled. The odds are not in Episcopal Migration Ministries’ favor, Robertson told Executive Council’s Mission Beyond the Episcopal Church Committee.“If we were going to bet on it, we’d bet we’re not going to make the cut,” Robertson said. He predicted only two of the nine would receive contracts. Though unlikely, he said it is still possible Episcopal Migration Ministries will be one of the two.Executive Council kicked off its meeting on Oct. 15 at the Oak Creek Hotel & Convention Center, nestled in tranquil lakeside woods in the western suburbs of the Twin Cities. The Episcopal Church put its beliefs into action in July through more than 500 resolutions at General Convention in Austin, Texas, and it is the council’s role to begin aligning church operations with those priorities and mandates.Much of that work starts with the church budget. General Convention adopted a $133.8 million 2019-2021 budget that reflects the presiding bishop’s priorities of evangelism, racial reconciliation and justice, and creation care. “Council’s job is to take that three-year budget and make it into three one-year budgets,” the Rev. Mally Lloyd of the Diocese of Massachusetts told Executive Council during her Finance Committee report on Oct. 18.Council approved a 2019 budget, as well as compensation for the second half of 2018 for the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, the House of Deputies president, based on a plan endorsed by General Convention. The Executive Council resolution approved $210,000 a year for the position of House of Deputies president.The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings speaks on Oct. 18, the final day of the four-day meeting of Executive Council in Chaska, Minnesota. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThe issue of diocesan assessments generated extended discussion among Executive Council members. Under the current triennial budget, each diocese is expected to contribute 15 percent to churchwide operations, a reduction from past budgets, though some dioceses historically have fallen short of even that lower target.Dioceses that fail to pay their assessments may be excluded from churchwide grant programs, though they also may apply for waivers allowing them to forgo some or all of the required amounts.“The only criteria for receiving a waiver is financial hardship,” Lloyd said, and she emphasized the process is not intended to be punitive. The committee in charge of following up with dioceses about their assessments emphasizes listening and conversation and welcomes “baby steps” toward full financial participation.The six dioceses granted waivers by Executive Council were Arizona, Haiti, Mississippi, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands and West Texas.“Arizona has a big burden of past due assessments,” Lloyd said, so the church has agreed to forgive those past obligations over three years if it keeps up with its current payments.Haiti, in recognition of the country’s poverty, has an agreement with the church outside of the assessment process to pay at least $5,000 a year, with the hope of increasing that to $11,000 by the end of the triennium. Mississippi, which Lloyd says is still dealing with the financial effects of Hurricane Katrina, aims to contribute 13 percent by the end of the triennium. Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands were granted full waivers because they are recovering from last year’s Hurricanes Irma and Maria.West Texas, however, is a special case that split the voting members of Executive Council. The diocese’s past participation – just six percent last year – has fallen well short of the church’s target, and though the diocese was hit last year by Hurricane Harvey, financial hardship is not a primary factor.Jennings asked why the church should grant the Diocese of West Texas a waiver if it was able to pay multiple bishops and maintain a sizable endowment fund. Other Executive Council members raised similar concerns and suggested amending the resolution to eliminate the waiver for West Texas.North Carolina Bishop Suffragan Anne Hodges-Copple spoke in favor of the waiver, saying it was about diplomacy and “strengthening the hand of some good bishops” in West Texas who have been encouraging “recalcitrant” Episcopalians to see themselves part of something larger than what is in their own backyards.“I love bringing them into the fold more strongly,” Hodges-Copple said.The vote to drop West Texas’ waiver failed, 14-18, and Executive Council proceeded to approve all six waivers.Executive Council has 40 voting members, including the presiding bishop and House of Deputies president, as well as additional nonvoting members, such as the Episcopal Church’s finance director and chief operating officer.Twenty of the voting members – four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 laypeople – are elected by General Convention to six-year terms, with half of those members elected every three years. The other 18 are elected to six-year terms by the Episcopal Church’s nine provinces, with each province sending one ordained member and one lay member.One of Executive Council’s first actions this week was to reduce its number of committees from five to four. The new committees are Finance, Government & Operations, Mission Within the Episcopal Church, and Mission Beyond the Episcopal Church. And one of the final actions of the week was to elect three at-large members to the Executive Committee: Julia Harris of the Diocese of Oklahoma, Rose Sconiers of the Diocese of Western New York and Utah Bishop Scott Hayashi.As business concluded Oct. 18, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry playfully described the week as “the karaoke meeting of the Executive Council,” a nod to one particularly memorable extracurricular activity from the meeting’s opening night. Breaking the ice was a core feature of this meeting, as Executive Council members found their bearings and got to know each other.The daily sessions also tackled serious subjects, such the ethical questions raised by the role-playing scenarios that Russell Randle, a senior member from the Diocese of Virginia, included in his training on Oct. 17. That training was followed by a session on racial reconciliation led by the Rev. Stephanie Spellers, the presiding bishop’s canon for evangelism, reconciliation and creation care.After a presentation by Spellers on the Episcopal Church’s Becoming Beloved Community framework, Executive Council broke into groups to share their experiences and think about how they are called to work for racial healing. The training concluded with all the members joining hands and singing.During a meeting of the Government & Operations Committee, members offered their feedback on the racial reconciliation training.“At our table, it got a little raw,” Pauline Getz, a member from the Diocese of San Diego, said. “Some of our conversation was hitting some rather deep chords.”Spellers told the committee that the church has moved away from a past emphasis on “anti-racism” in favor of the language of racial healing, encouraging Episcopalians to interact graciously with each other without demonizing people for struggling with their own racism. Such a Christian approach can be applied beyond the work of racial reconciliation, she said.“If we do this work the way we as a church have said we want to, it will change how we relate to everything,” Spellers said. “This is about us living in the Jesus way.”Later that afternoon, Robertson gave a sobering outlook on Episcopal Migration Ministries’ future to the committee on Mission Beyond the Episcopal Church.The Rev. Charles Robertson, the presiding bishop’s canon for ministry beyond the church, speaks Oct. 17 to the committee on Mission Beyond the Episcopal Church. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“We are prepared for the worst,” Robertson said – the worst being the end of Episcopal Migration Ministries’ contract to continue the resettlement work it has done for the federal government since the 1980s.The U.S. Department of State announced Sept. 17 that it would lower the ceiling to just 30,000 refugees for the fiscal year that began Oct. 1, down from a ceiling of 85,000 just two years ago. And that 30,000 is just the upper limit, Robertson stressed. The actual number of refugees to be welcomed into the United States likely will be much lower.Episcopal Migration Ministries once oversaw 31 resettlement affiliates in 26 dioceses, but that number has dwindled to 14 affiliates in 12 dioceses. With even fewer refugees to resettle, the federal government isn’t expected to keep all nine of its contracted agencies, Robertson said, and Episcopal Migration Ministries, though well equipped to do that work, is one of the smaller of the nine.Even in the worst-case scenario, however, Episcopal Migration Ministries will remain an important part of the Episcopal Church’s outreach efforts. If the resettlement work ends, the agency may find other ways to support refugees and, possibly, other immigrants, Robertson said. He estimated it would take about a year to fully realize that new vision for the agency.In the meantime, he suggested that Executive Council recognize the exemplary work of the agency’s employees. Council passed a resolution Oct. 18 commending Episcopal Migration Ministries, “whose dedicated staff, during a season of flux and uncertainty, have worked tirelessly and in a sacrificial manner to support refugees in many parts of the world who seek resettlement in the United States.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Executive Council, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books La Diócesis de San Diego anunció el exitoso proceso de consentimiento canónico La ordenación y consagración de la obispa electa Snook el 15 de junio An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Posted Apr 12, 2019 Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [12 de abril de 2019] La Diócesis Episcopal de San Diego recibió una notificación del Obispo Presidente y Primado Michael B. Curry y del registrador de la Convención General, el Reverendo Canónigo Michael Barlowe, de que la obispa electa Susan Brown Snook ha recibido la mayoría requerida de consentimientos en el proceso de consentimiento canónico detallado en Canon III.11.3.Al dar consentimiento a su ordenación y consagración, los Comités Permanentes y los obispos con jurisdicción dan fe de que “no hay impedimento debido al cual” la obispa electa Snook no debe ser ordenada como obispa, y que su elección se llevó a cabo de acuerdo con los cánones.La Reverenda Canóniga Susan Brown Snook fue elegida obispa el 2 de febrero. La Rvma. Katharine Jefferts Schori oficiará en su ordenación y servicio de consagración el 15 de junio. fue elegida obispa el 2 de febrero. El Obispo Presidente Curry oficiará en su ordenación y servicio de consagración el 15 de junio. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img Summerhouse T / Krupinski/Krupinska Arkitekter ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/797823/summerhouse-t-krupinski-krupinska-arkitekter Clipboard Houses “COPY” Projects Architects: Krupinski/Krupinska Arkitekter Area Area of this architecture project CopyAbout this officeKrupinski/Krupinska ArkitekterOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteel#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesOtherSmall ScaleStockholmSwedenPublished on October 24, 2016Cite: “Summerhouse T / Krupinski/Krupinska Arkitekter” 24 Oct 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogShowershansgroheShower MixersEducational3MProjection Screen Whiteboard FilmPartitionsSkyfoldWhere to Increase Flexibility in SchoolsLinoleum / Vinyl / Epoxy / UrethaneTerrazzo & MarbleTerrazzo in The Gateway ArchSkylightsLAMILUXGlass Skylight FE PassivhausConcreteKrytonSmart ConcreteMetallicsTrimoMetal Panels for Roofs – Trimoterm SNVWire MeshGKD Metal FabricsMetal Fabric in Kansas City University BuildingGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Curved Glass PrintingMetallicsRHEINZINKZinc Roof Systems – Double Lock Standing SeamChairs / StoolsFreifrauBarstool – OnaSealants / ProtectorsWoodenha IndustriesFireproofing System for Wood Cladding – BIME®More products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/797823/summerhouse-t-krupinski-krupinska-arkitekter Clipboard 2015 ArchDaily Summerhouse T / Krupinski/Krupinska ArkitekterSave this projectSaveSummerhouse T / Krupinski/Krupinska Arkitektercenter_img Photographs CopyHouses, Small Scale•Stockholm, Sweden Save this picture!© Åke E:son Lindman+ 17 Share Year:  Area:  40 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Manufacturers: Falu Rödfärg, MatakiSave this picture!© Åke E:son LindmanRecommended ProductsDoorsVEKADoors – VEKAMOTION 82DoorsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Sliding Door – Rabel 62 Slim Super ThermalDoorsSky-FrameInsulated Sliding Doors – Sky-Frame ArcWoodGustafsWood Veneered Wall & Ceiling PanelsText description provided by the architects. The small house is situated by a lake in the Stockholm archipelago, on a site that in the early 1900s was inhabited by a gardener. Plants and paved walls that were then organised still remain to a large extent today. For the last 25 years another garden interested family have used the old existing house as a summer home. The family, consisting of mother and two daughters, has grown in recent years when the two daughters have formed families on their own. That in turn has made more space necessary. One sister has renovated an existing guest house, while the other sister decided to build a new small house, Summerhouse T, for her family consisting of two adults and two children. The family formulated a program that included a kitchen, bathroom, dining area, living room, four beds and room for storage. While municipal constraints did not allow a building that exceeded 40 m2. Save this picture!© Åke E:son LindmanSave this picture!Floor PlanSave this picture!© Åke E:son LindmanA large open square room with a standalone volume containing the beds, kitchen and storage was proposed. Along the buildings southern side is a dining area and a living area. Roof, floor and walls have a dark colour to enhance the building’s intimate character and direct the eye towards the surrounding view. The house’s only (trap) door leads to the bathroom, a separate volume which design was adapted to fit into an existing gap in the nearby rock. The open organization with ceiling high windows create a surprisingly large number of different spatial experiences. Freedom of movement along the entire facade gives a feeling that the house is larger and more spacious than it in reality is. The parents’ sleeping area has a view towards the countryside and the lake while the children’s more enclosed sleeping alcove directs the view towards the grandmother ́s house. The storage passage at the back of the house opens up to the greenery outside at one end while the parallel kitchen has contrasting views in opposit directions. The living room with dining area and lounge, in turn, have a 180 degree view towards the surrounding. Two of the walls are sliding windows that on hot summer days easily opens and allow for a pleasant breeze through the house and at the same time extend the living area to the exterior, where the roof overhang provides protection against the sun. On rainy days, water runs along the eaves almost as physically present curtain and the house suddenly closes inward.Save this picture!© Åke E:son LindmanProduct Description. The façade of Summerhouse T is painted with the traditional Swedish color Falu Rödfärg. The black color and the matt finish adds to the project´s discrete character.Save this picture!© Åke E:son LindmanProject gallerySee allShow lessArchitects As Developers: The Pros & ConsArticlesHalf A House Builds A Whole Community: Elemental’s Controversial Social HousingArchitecture News Share Photographs:  Åke E:son Lindman Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project “COPY” Swedenlast_img read more

READ MORE

first_img Howard Lake | 10 October 2008 | News  55 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: England legacies Research / statistics Scotland Wales / Cymru Will Aid shares survey results on will-making Will Aid, the charity will-making scheme, has published the results of its 2008 survey into wills and will-making.Alarmingly it has found that 60% of adults have not written their Will. Of these, 50% say they simply haven’t got around to it, with 26% believing they are too young and almost 23% thinking they have no possessions or money to leave.Ironically, 17% of these people have themselves experienced problems with an inheritance.The research was carried out by Lightspeed Research during March 2008 with a nationally representative sample of 2,000 adults in England, Wales and Scotland.It found that the most effective prompt for writing a Will is the death of a loved one (27.7%), followed by the birth of children or grandchildren (23.5%) and pressure from a partner (21.2%).The message about the importance of leaving a legacy to charity still has some way to go, according to the research. Only 4.5% of respondents had promised a legacy to charity in their Will with a further 10.2% “intending” to do so.Those under 24 years old were the most likely to intend to leave a legacy to charity (18.20%) but the 25-34 year olds are the most likely never to have thought of it. Encouragingly, the over-55s are very aware of legacies, with only 16.5% saying that they have never thought of it.Over 7% of people from the East have already left a legacy and over 13% in the South intend to do so. Respondents from Scotland are most likely to believe that their loved ones should receive all their assets.Will Aid is a partnership between solicitors and nine leading UK charities – ActionAid, British Red Cross, Christian Aid, Help the Aged, NSPCC, Save the Children UK, Sight Savers International, SCIAF and Trocaire.It’s annual Will Making Month begins next month.www.willaid.org.uk/press/research-77 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago  Print This Post About Author: Seth Welborn The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribe Home / Daily Dose / HUD’s Dr. Benjamin Carson Delivers Opportunity Zone Update Share 2Save HUD’s Dr. Benjamin Carson Delivers Opportunity Zone Update Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Related Articles Sign up for DS News Daily The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agocenter_img June 18, 2020 3,494 Views Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: Disaster Response During a Challenging Summer Next: Where Renting is More Appealing Than Homeownership The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Dr. Ben Carson, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Chairman of the White House Opportunity and Revitalization Council (Council), delivered a report this month to President Donald J. Trump outlining Opportunity Zone best practices and examples of revitalization occurring across the Nation. On December 12, 2018, President Trump established the Council to support the Administration’s pledge to encourage public and private investment in urban and economically distressed areas, including Opportunity Zones. Since the Council’s one-year report was issued in December of 2019, the Council has taken approximately 80 additional action items-for a total of more than 270-to promote the mission of Opportunity Zones.”On behalf of the Council, we are pleased to issue this report, which includes case studies and best practices observed by the Council across the country,” said Council leadership in the report to the President. “There are inspiring stories happening in real time, with action being taken by State governments, local governments, Qualified Opportunity Funds, public-private partnerships, and others to spur revitalizing investments in the areas of most need. This report will prove to be especially helpful and encouraging to communities as they continue to admirably fight the invisible enemy known as COVID-19.”The report identifies legislation and executive actions that States have taken to aid the Federal Opportunity Zones mission. The report further discusses the efforts of State agencies to become involved in the Opportunity Zones space, including through contests and competitions, and outlines ways that State-specific actions regarding Opportunity Zones have created certainty and stability for investors. The second section also features examples of State websites that offer a “matchmaking service” between investors and entrepreneurs in Opportunity Zones. Each State’s Opportunity Zones-related website link can be found on the homepage of the “OpportunityZones.gov” website.The report offers examples of national foundations with billions of dollars in assets that provide support to Opportunity Zone communities and investors who seek to make a positive social and economic impact. It also offers examples of charitable organizations that are focused on issues within the Council’s work streams-issues like reentry for those who have served time in prison; housing affordability for those who are cost-burdened; and mentorship for at-risk youth.The third section also highlights best practices of private financial institutions that have devoted considerable resources towards establishing unique and innovative tools that can help drive investment in Opportunity Zones and benefit communities across economically distressed areas, whether they be rural, urban, suburban, or tribal. For example, MasterCard’s Center for Inclusive Growth has developed a toolkit that reveals insights into the current state and potential for inclusive growth in Opportunity Zones across the country. Likewise, Citi has launched a data-driven platform to support Opportunity Zone investments by aggregating key social information about different Opportunity Zones. The report also references the teams that competed in the Opportunity Zones component of the 2019 Opportunity Project sprints, an initiative of the U.S. Census Bureau. HUD Opportunity Zones 2020-06-18 Seth Welborn Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Tagged with: HUD Opportunity Zones in Daily Dose, Featured, Newslast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgTop StoriesContempt of Court- Prashant Bhushan Moves Supreme Court Seeking Hearing On Plea For Intra-Court Appeal Before Review Petitions Are Adjudicated Sanya Talwar15 Dec 2020 6:54 AMShare This – xAdvocate Prashant Bhushan has moved the Supreme Court seeking a direction from the top court that the two plea’s praying review of the orders of conviction for contempt of court be heard after the adjudication of the petition raising the issue of right of appeal.On August 14, 2020 the Supreme Court held Bhushan guilty of contempt of court in the suo moto contempt case taken against him over…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginAdvocate Prashant Bhushan has moved the Supreme Court seeking a direction from the top court that the two plea’s praying review of the orders of conviction for contempt of court be heard after the adjudication of the petition raising the issue of right of appeal.On August 14, 2020 the Supreme Court held Bhushan guilty of contempt of court in the suo moto contempt case taken against him over two of his tweets about the Chief Justice of India and the Supreme Court.The instant application has been moved a day before the top court is expected to consider two of his plea’s seeking review of the conviction. A three judge bench led by Justice AM Khanwilkar is scheduled to hear it tomorrow in-chambers.”That the instant writ petition has been filed under Article 32 of the Constitution of India for the enforcement of fundamental rights guaranteed under Articles 14, 19 and 21 of the Constitution of India seeking issuance of an appropriate writ, order or direction declaring that a person convicted in an original criminal contempt case by this Hon’ble Court would have a right to an intra-court appeal to be heard by a larger and different bench and for laying down rules and guidelines for the same OR in the alternative, an appropriate writ, order, or direction declaring that review petitions filed against orders of conviction by Supreme Court in original criminal contempt cases would be heard in open court by a different bench. That the existing Act and Rules, do not bar or prohibit the prayers as sought by the Petitioner,” the plea reads.Bhushan has averred in his application, filed through advocate Kamini Jaiswal that prayers made in the petition challenging his conviction, have “a direct bearing” on the review petitions filed by him.He has stated that despite the application seeking urgent listing was filed on September 14 in the petition, the matter has not been listed before the court “whereas instant and connected review petitions have been suddenly listed for hearing on December 16, 2020″.”Right of Appeal is an absolute right according to Article 14(5) of International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) which India has ratified and is therefore binding upon the Indian State. Under ICCPR, first appeal is a right even where trial is by the Highest Court and Review is not a substitute for an appeal,” Bhushan extrapolates as one his grounds.Further, Bhushan states that a larger question in the instant plea which arises is that there exists a need for important procedural safeguards when this Hon’ble Court considers cases of criminal contempt in original proceedings, i.e. those proceedings where this Hon’ble Court does not act as an appellate Court.The petition states that the right of appeal is a fundamental right guaranteed under the Constitution and is also guaranteed under international law and this would act as a “vital safeguard against wrongful conviction and would truly enable the provision of truth as a defence”.In his September 14 review petition, Mr. Bhushan had cited various instances suggesting that Justice Mishra’s presence on the Bench raises a reasonable apprehension on his part of getting a “fair and impartial hearing”.In this background, the petitioner has sought issuance of an appropriate writ, order or direction declaring that a person convicted for criminal contempt by this Hon’ble Court, including the petitioner herein, would have a right to an intra-court appeal to be heard by a larger and different bench as well as framing rules and guidelines providing for intra-court appeal against conviction in original criminal contempt cases.Alternatively, the petitioner has sought issuance of an appropriate writ, order, or direction declaring that review petitions filed against orders of conviction by Supreme Court in original criminal contempt cases would be heard in open court by a different bench.Next Storylast_img read more

READ MORE

first_img DL Debate – 24/05/21 Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Google+ A Dublin GP says there is no evidence the reopening of schools has caused a rise of Covid cases.NPHET yesterday reported Covid cases among children have increased by as much as 60 per cent since February.But Dr Ray Walley says the rise is because far more testing is being carried out……..Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/walley3pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Twitter Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterest GP says schools are not behind the latest Covid surge WhatsApp Twitter WhatsApp Facebookcenter_img Pinterest Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic AudioHomepage BannerNews By News Highland – March 26, 2021 Google+ News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Previous articleTwo Donegal speed detections highlighted on Slow Down DayNext articleDonegal motorist caught doing 122kph in a 50kph Zone News Highland Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgSmyrna Police/National Center for Missing and Exploited Children(SMYRNA, Del.) — Police released facial reconstruction images in the hopes of identifying a little girl who had been dead for weeks by the time she was found in Delaware, authorities said.The remains of the little girl, who was likely between 2 and 5 years old, were discovered near the Little Lass fields in Smyrna on Sept. 13, said Smyrna police. She had been dead for several weeks or possibly longer.On Monday, police released facial reconstruction images created by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children that depict what the girl may have looked like.The little girl was Caucasian or Hispanic with slightly wavy brown hair, said police. An exam of her remains suggests she suffered from chronic illnesses, police added.While she appears to have resembled 5-year-old Dulce Maria Alavez, who vanished from a New Jersey playground, police said Dulce went missing on Sept. 16 — three days after the Smyrna girl’s remains were found. “We are still seeking tips from the public about the child’s identity and any possible suspect information,” police said in a statement Monday. “We ask that the public take a close look at these images and report any and all possible information on this case to the Smyrna Police Department, Crime Stoppers, and/or The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgMarilyn Nieves/iStockBy ALEX HOSENBALL and MATTHEW MOSK, ABC News(PHILADELPHIA) — Two more Pennsylvania legal challenges by President Donald Trump’s campaign appear to have failed, insuring that more than 2,700 ballots that had been contested over technicalities would, in fact, be counted.One case, filed in the Philadelphia suburb of Bucks County, sought to toss out 2,177 ballots over missing words on the address line or improperly sealed secrecy envelopes. A similar challenge brought in neighboring Montgomery County was ordered closed by the court.In dismissing the Bucks County lawsuit, Judge Robert O. Baldi said it would be “an injustice to disenfranchise these voters” based on the technical errors with the ballots. Baldi noted repeatedly that the Trump team “specifically stipulated” that “there exists no evidence of any fraud, misconduct, or any impropriety with respect to the challenged ballots.”“There is nothing in the record and nothing alleged that would lead to the conclusion that any of the challenged ballots were submitted by someone not qualified or entitled to vote in this election,” Baldi wrote.The point took on added significance as the Trump legal team, and the president himself, have continued to allege fraud on social media and in press appearances — but not as stridently in court where evidence is required to support the claim.Eliza Sweren-Becker, counsel for the Democracy Program at the bipartisan Brennan Center for Justice, told ABC News suits like these appear aimed at grabbing attention.“In large part, this litigation, the other cases that the campaign has filed are really a distraction,” Sweren-Becker said. “It’s important to recognize the frivolous nature of these suits.”Some of the reasons the Trump team argued would disqualify ballots involved mail-in ballots from voters who left off part of their address or failed to properly secure the secrecy envelope, among other concerns the judge cited as “minor.”“The minor irregularity of a lack of a complete handwritten name or address is not necessary to prevent fraud and there would be no other significant interest undermined by allowing these ballots to be counted,” he wrote.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

READ MORE