May 15, 2021
  • 5:47 pm Data file: Redundancy and collective consultation
  • 5:47 pm How a tribunal tests for harm
  • 5:45 pm IT helps HR lay foundation for other functions
  • 5:43 pm Powercut
  • 5:39 pm Learning to think outside the books

first_imgData file: Redundancy and collective consultationOn 15 May 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. The latest in a series of articles that give the basics on key areas ofemployment legislation.  This issue welook at redundancy and collective consultationThe hard facts Trade Union and Labour (Consolidation) Act 1992 As amended by Collective Redundancies and Tupe (Amendment) Regulations1999 came into force 1 November 1999. Section 188 – (1) Establishes a duty for the employer to consult when proposing to dismissmore that 20 employees by way of redundancy – (1A) Sets out time-scales for consultation according to number of employees – (2) Sets out what the consultation should involve – (3) Outlines which employees should be included for the purpose ofdetermining the number of employees to be dismissed for redundancy – (4) The employer must disclose certain information in writing to therepresentatives – (5), (5A) The employer shall deliver information to representatives in personor by post and allow access to such accommodation and facilities as appropriate– (7) Special circumstances which render it not reasonably practicable foremployers to comply with the section – Section 188A Sets out requirements for the election of employeerepresentatives – Section 189-196 Complaints, protective awards and duty of employer to notifySecretary of State of certain redundancies www.legislation.hmso.gov.uk/acts/acts1992/Ukpga_19920052_en_1.htmEmployment Rights Act 1996 Came into force 28 July 1999. Establishes certain rights to be affordedto employee representatives. – Section 47 Right not to be subjected to any detriment – Section 61 Right to time off for employee representatives – Section 103 Establishes automatic unfair dismissal for an employee who isdismissed by reason of being an employee representative www.legislation.hmso.gov.uk/acts/acts1996/1996018.htmReading around the subject – The Department of Trade and Industry website provides information foremployers and employees facing a potential redundancy situation. The websitegives access to DTI guidance notes and research papers.  www.dti.gov.uk/er/redundancy.htm– The Acas website has a link to its advisory booklet on redundancy handling.  www.acas.org.ukIn the news – “CBI attacks unions over redundancy law ‘myths’” – FinancialTimes, 4 May 2001. http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/articles.html?id=010504000606&query=redundancy+consultation+– “Job cuts coming – but don’t tell the workers” – The Scotsman,19 April 2001 http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/articles.html?id=010419005771&query=redundancy– “Lay-offs push Paris to act on labour law” – The Independent, 25April 2001. http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/articles.html?id=010425002921&query=marks+and+spencer+AND+france+AND+redundancy– “Court blocks closure of M&S stores in Paris” – The Times,10 April 2001.  www.thetimes.co.uk/article/0,,3-112281,00.html Comments are closed. last_img read more

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first_imgBest start to the termWith a distinct absence of plays kicking off Trinity Term, there is disappointingly little competition for this slot. Be this as it may, let it take nothing away from Emma Jenkinson’s sterling performance this week, as she takes on the lead role of Sarah in Harold Pinter’s The Lover. In doing so, she has proved equal to her previously high standards. Audiences might well remember her as the delightfully bitchy hostess in Mike Leigh’s Abigail’s Party at the O’Reilly, a role which Jenkinson performed in true Hyacinth Bucket fashion. The diversity of her talent was demonstrated by her “flawless portrayal” of Maggie last year in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, a role that demanded a quite different style.Casting disaster of the weekAs any director will undoubtedly tell you, casting is an integral part of the production process. It requires careful attention and deliberation to find the right man for the right role. No stranger to controversy, Tom Littler has demonstrated this week that it just doesn’t do to be too picky. Having been unable to find anyone talented enough to meet the high standards of professionalism he appears to have demanded for the role of Thomas a Becket, he has entirely abandoned his forthcoming production of Murder in the Cathedral, due to have taken place in Christ Church Chapel. That said, Littler soon may not be alone in his plight. This term’s OUDS calender is typically crowded, and Oxford’s top stars are in short supply. With several actors having already taken on a number of productions, and others sidelined by exam commitments, it may be time for some new talent to step forward.And another thing…Ah, Burlesk. It was such a talking point last term, but can the enigmatic and at times rather hit-andmiss Jongleurs regular engage and regain a Trinity audience? For a start, they’ve moved to a Monday night slot starting at 10pm, which affords them the opportunity of presenting a longer performance. According to Sheridan Edwards, the show’s coordinator, this will consist of up to 75% more material including some rather topical, if somewhat unorthodox, party political broadcasts. A lot of Burlesk’s custom seems to be coming from the organisation of launch parties for student theatrical productions; look out for that of Orpheus in the Underworld in 5th Week. They will also be branching out from the Jongleurs venue, playing at the Christ Church and St Cross balls, before heading to the Edinburgh Festival and then on a mini-tour of London after the summer season. So the future does look bright in terms of demand; but the jury is still out as to whether the performative strength of the show can ever live up to its slick marketing.ARCHIVE: 0th week TT 2005last_img read more

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first_imgOver the past decade, scientists have produced a flurry of studies exploring the role of genetic (nature) and environmental factors (nurture) in youth depression, but there has been little consensus on how depression is jointly impacted by specific genes and external factors, such as poverty, abuse, and negative family relationships.The lack of a clear understanding of how genes and environments both contribute to childhood depression led Erin Dunn, postdoctoral research fellow and recent graduate of the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), and her colleagues to do a comprehensive review of studies that tested for gene-environment interaction in youth depression. Their goal was to systematically identify these studies, examine the methods used, and summarize findings to guide future studies. The review was published December, 2011 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP). Read the abstract.Dunn, a former Richmond Fellow at the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, has had a longstanding interest in children’s mental health ever since teaching in early childhood and elementary school settings, where she saw students with a variety of mental health issues.last_img read more

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first_imgOn March 11, University President Fr. John Jenkins broke the news that the Notre Dame community would not be returning to the classroom after spring break — at least, not for a very long time. In a campus-wide email, Jenkins announced campus would close March 17 and conduct classes online as a precautionary measure against the coronavirus outbreak. From all corners of the world, students — many without textbooks and equipped with only a week’s worth of clothes — wondered what this transition would mean for them. Less than an hour later, vice president for student affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding sent an email to students outlining more details about Notre Dame’s closure and how the University would help them navigate it. Hall rectors were tasked with relaying the specifics of move-out, however. According to emails obtained by The Observer, the majority reached out to their residents within hours of Hoffmann Harding’s March 11 email.Their messages followed near-identical frameworks and mirrored Hoffmann Harding’s words from earlier that day. Still, they varied widely in tone: Most recommended students not come back to campus to gather their belongings unless they were in the South Bend area. Some said no students, regardless of location, could return to campus at all.At least three took the liberty to set time limits on how long students returning to campus could enter their dorms to retrieve personal items. Multiple students reported they had to gather their belongings in 30 minutes or less.The Observer reached out to all 31 rectors asking if any had imposed such a time limit. Many re-routed the inquiry to University Communications. None elected to comment.Speaking on the rectors’ behalf, University spokesperson Dennis Brown directed The Observer to Hoffmann Harding’s earlier emails. He did not say if any rectors set time limits on how long returning students could stay.Brown would not specify if rectors did not comment because they were not allowed to.“Like most organizations, we prefer to speak with one voice, especially in the midst of serious events such as the pandemic,” he said in an email. In hall-wide emails reviewed by The Observer, rectors also told their residents the University would contact those eligible to stay on campus by March 13. Only some told students to reach out to them if they had reasons to remain on campus they feared the University did not already know about.In a statement to The Observer, Brown said Notre Dame “was able to provide continued room and board in University-sponsored housing to all students who needed it.”This select group was initially about 250 students, Hoffmann Harding said in a March 18 email to the Notre Dame community. All others were told to leave campus by noon Tuesday, March 17.  The Office of Student Enrichment provided an avenue for students who needed other accommodations. Director Consuela Howell said the office works to ensure students’ personal and academic needs are met, funding food, housing, travel and essential electronics such as laptops.“We have received requests from 343 students,” Howell said in an email. “We were able to assist all but 20 whom we promptly connected to other resources, including Financial Aid, OIT or contacts within their colleges, who were better suited to address their concerns.”Still, sophomore Max O’Connor, a Lewis Hall resident, struggled to navigate move-out on the University’s deadline.Though O’Connor did not need to stay at Notre Dame while classes went remote, campus closed on a Tuesday and his father could not pick him up until the following weekend. O’Connor arranged to move in with other students off-campus, but reconsidered when he came down with a cough. Wanting to be cautious, he contacted University Health Services and emailed his rector, Clarice Ramirez, asking if he could stay in his room for a few more days. Ramirez did not respond to a request for comment.“I was supposed to go to someone else‘s place to sleep until my dad could pick me up this weekend, but I‘m a little scared I’m sick and I don‘t want to infect them,” O’Connor said in the email to Ramirez. “Because of this, I no longer have a place to stay and I‘m not sure what to do cause I don‘t want to get anyone sick so I am keeping to myself for now. I called UHS and they said they‘ll get back to me within two hours but I thought I should make you aware of the situation.”Ramirez replied and said she would not be able to readmit O‘Connor into the residence hall.“I wouldn’t be allowed to let you back into Lewis,” Ramirez said in the email. “What are your plans until your dad picks you up? Hope you feel better!”O’Connor did not respond. Fearing he would be forced out of his room and have nowhere to sleep, he said he kept to himself the rest of Tuesday. “I had nowhere to go at that point,” he said. “So I didn‘t want to leave.”For food, he relied on snacks from the Huddle Mart and whatever was around his room. In the meantime, he sought help from fellow students. For a while, he considered sleeping outside.“I’m just like, ‘I have a hammock and a rain fly. Worse comes to worst and I’m kicked out, I could just string my hammock up in some trees and sleep there,’” he said. “But since it was raining and chilly, and I had a cough, I didn’t think that was the best move.”Later Tuesday, he got permission to stay at a peer’s empty condo near campus. O’Connor said the UHS called him back close to 2 a.m. the next morning — seven hours after he first contacted them. The UHS told him he was probably fine, he said, given he only had a cough and no fever.The Observer reached out to UHS asking if wait times for phone consultations had inflated the week of March 16. Again, the request for comment was redirected to Brown. The UHS “has not experienced higher wait times than expected,” Brown said in an email.O’Connor safely moved into the empty condo the afternoon of March 18. He said though his journey home was rocky, he acknowledges move-out was not an easy task for Residential Life.“This is new to everyone. So, I get that it’s all a mess,” he said.  “I’m just glad I could have other students there to help.”Tags: coronavirus, move-out, Office of Student Affairs, Office of Student Enrichment, residence halls, University President Father John Jenkinslast_img read more

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first_img View Comments The world premiere of Sarah Burgess’ Dry Powder opens officially at the Public Theater on March 22. The play, directed by Hamilton’s Thomas Kail, stars The Office’s John Krasinski in his stage debut and Homeland Emmy winner Claire Danes.To commemorate the off-Broadway production’s big night, Broadway.com resident artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson created this portrait of the whole cast in action. In addition to Krasinski and Danes as Seth and Jenny, respectively, the sketch features Hank Azaria as Rick and Sanjit De Silva as Jeff Schrader.Broadway.com wishes the team at Dry Powder a happy opening! © Justin “Squigs” Robertson About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home. Dry Powder Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on May 1, 2016last_img read more

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first_imgCoal trader tells industry low prices are here to stay for a while FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:Commodity trader Noble Group sees thermal coal prices coming under pressure over the next few years given an oversupply and waning demand from Europe where natural gas and renewables are gaining a greater market share, analyst Rodrigo Echeverri said on Monday.“The coal market in Europe is on a very steep decline from which it is not likely to recover,” he said. Futures prices for coal and natural gas also point to gas remaining as a more economical source of power generation, further depressing the outlook for coal.In South Korea, coal and gas generation have both lost ground to nuclear generation. Nuclear energy has climbed back up to 14,000 Gigawatt hours. The Korea Coal and Gas demand should decline 3.7% decline year on year against 2018. That would mean an approximately 9,205 Gigawatt hours less supply of electricity generated from coal.China’s imports look pessimistic in light of macro slow-down and strong domestic output. Construction activity was very strong last year, but it is starting to slow-down again.India remains one of the few potential growth areas in the market. Power generation is growing at twice the rate of China.“Because of the magnitude of the oversupply” all coal producers have to consider cutting back output, Echeverri told participants at the Coaltrans conference in Indonesian island of Bali.More: Noble Group sees lower coal prices for next few yearslast_img read more

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first_img Chips Shore “It’s been very exciting and very interesting work,” Shore said. “My goal is to have as much information as possible on-line for the public and attorneys in-house. It’s a big help to us in the clerk’s office, too, because it reduces the traffic into the courthouse. It’s the wave of the future.”But not everyone is gung ho to go high-tech, concedes Karl Youngs, general counsel for the Manatee County Clerk of Court.“The reaction has been mixed at this point. We still have some attorneys who only have one computer in their office and others are taking advantage of all the latest technology, and I’m sure there are even some still using a typewriter.” Youngs said. “There’s a huge spread of differences. That’s why we won’t mandate that all attorneys use electronic filing. But anything they give us in paper will be scanned. We won’t hold paper at the courthouse anymore.“Like anything new, there will be a learning curve,” Youngs added. “What we intend to do is give demonstrations and training at the clerk’s office.”Eddie Mulock, a former member of the Bar Board of Governors, is a fan of the e-file movement.“I think that electronic filing and an on-line criminal system are two of the best examples of putting technology to use for the betterment of our community,” Mulock said.“For attorneys, e-filing will save time, reduce cost, and increase our accessibility to information. All members of the legal community who register with this system will have the ability to file documents electronically. And everyone with Internet access will have immediate access to the most current information. We’ll all be looking at the same database, and we’ll have to worry less and less about paper files. It’s fantastic.”Shore said he’s already seen dramatic efficiencies in putting documents online. When Manatee County began scanning documents in the recording division and putting them on the Internet about two years ago, that move has already decreased people coming into the office by 60 percent and reduced microfilm machines from nine to two, Shore said.With the new live online filing for criminal courts, not only will judges and attorneys have access to a centralized database that allows them to scroll down a menu list of documents instead of flipping through a thick file, but law enforcement will be able to immediately confirm if a person has outstanding warrants.For the general public, from the convenience of a home or office computer, parents will be able to check on the backgrounds of care-givers for their children or elderly parents, property owners will be able to do background checks on renters, and employers will be able to see if potential employees have a criminal record.All data is current and accurate, Shore stressed, and changes can be made in real-time.No more paying runners to take a document to the courthouse. No more waiting days to receive documents in the mail.Sarasota County will follow Manatee County within a month, Shore said, adding that the goal is to have a complete database for the entire 12th Judicial Circuit, including DeSoto County.In 1998, Leon County had hopes of being first to lead the state into paperless courts.“We abandoned the effort,” said John Stott, chief deputy clerk for Leon County, explaining the past three years has been focused on Y2K readiness and software upgrades instead.“The rules were in place. The problem was our software systems wouldn’t support it. The fact that no one is up and doing it yet shows that everyone has had problems. Manatee got a grant for parts of it, and we decided we’d back off and let them pilot it. Sometimes when you try to pilot things, it doesn’t work out, and ours did not.”Asked what he attributes to Manatee being Florida’s first in e-filing, Youngs was quick to answer: “Mr. Shore. We started out with our official records. We were the first to go online and won a national award. He’s not in a race to be first. He just wants to make it happen. He believes it’s the most efficient way to manage the courts and serve the public.” By August 15, Shore said, the clerk’s office will set up accounts with attorneys who are willing to pay a $25 yearly fee to use this high-tech method of filing court documents on a secure website, a charge that is intended to prevent people from misusing the system. The court system administrator will authorize the attorney’s account, and a unique password will be created for each attorney. Next up, traffic cases by October 31, followed by civil records by December 31, and then recording of documents such as mortgages, deeds, and marriage licenses on February 1, 2002. June 15, 2001 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular Newscenter_img Manatee launches e-filing system See also: Website to link court clerks Associate EditorFour years after the Florida Supreme Court gave its official blessing to electronic filing of court documents, Manatee County is now poised to become the first clerk’s office in Florida to finally make it happen.As Manatee Clerk of the Circuit Court R.B. “Chips” Shore likes to say: “The courthouse is only a click away.”On July 15, the first area at the Manatee County courts to go live with electronic filing will be criminal cases for in-house users. State attorneys, public defenders, and probation officers will receive information on defendants electronically from central booking, and the public records will be filed online throughout the duration of the case.Thanks to two grants from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement totaling $483,553, Shore was able to design and develop the first electronic filing of criminal records system in the state to be approved by the Supreme Court.The online criminal justice system replaces a trip to the courthouse and flipping through paper files, taking notes, or making Xerox copies. Instead, a few clicks of a mouse and a few taps on a keyboard will light up a personal computer screen with public information available at any time of day. Manatee launches e-filing systemlast_img read more

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first_imgDolija 08 OPG Klaudio Vitasović Quieto Common Craft Cervar Out of a maximum of 100 points, three olive growers from Istria ( Ipša, Mate and Olea BB) they scored an impressive 98 points. Primorje-Gorski KotarOPG Jud Branko OPG Anton and Nivio Stojnić Ipsha Olive grove Akrapovič OPG Mario Crnobori OPG Enio Zubin OPG Bodiš Uljara Babić OPG Loris Bajkin OPG Petar Palčić OPG Grgorinić For the fifth time in a row, Istria has been declared the world’s best olive growing region. OPG Vošten OPG Andrea Grabunda – Traulin Oils OPG Filip Čeko Mate OPG Nadišić – Olea Magica Al Torcio Oil Mill OPG Rakovac OPG Saša Bernobić OPG Tone Grubešić OPG Buršić Kristofola Meneghetti Valenzan OPG Dario Činić OPG Viviano Antolović See the list of the 500 best olive oils in the world according to the Flos Olei 2020 guide HEREList of Croatian olive growers among the 500 best according to the Flos Olei 2020 guide – ResearchAgrolaguna Agroproduct OPG Marko Geržinić OPG Kristjan Brajko B10 Istrian Fusion In the popular publication Flos Olei 2020, which is considered the bible of olive oils, out of the 500 best olive oils in the world, as many as 79 oils from Croatia are included. Out of the total number, 77 olive growers are from Istria and one each from Dalmatia and Primorje-Gorski Kotar County. OPG Mauricio Beaković Brist Olive Grubic OPG Denis Has OPG Aurora Volarević Family farm Andrea Brečević – Rheoscenter_img OPG Francesco Bellani RELATED NEWS: Nonno Bruno Oil Mill OPG Lupić Oleum Maris Primizia Ursaria OPG Chiavalon Olive Monte Cucco OPG Marina Bonaiuto Split-DalmatiaOPG Žarko Željko OPG Giancarlo Zigante OPG Korado Sergović Olea Prima – OPG Saric Olivetum Posavianus Bosco Monte OPG Đino Antonac OPG Dean Fabijančić OPG Guido Zanini OPG Silvano Bartolić OPG Radola OPG Josip Franković Torkop Orphan Negri Olive Kalčić Olea BB Family farm Damir Vanđelić OPG Katica Kaldenhoff – Olea Kalden EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL “ISTRIA” PROTECTED AT THE LEVEL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION Vergal OPG Matteo Belci OPG Paulišić – Oliveri Tonin Dobravac OPG Balija Monte Rosso It is an immeasurable success for Istria, where the tradition of olive growing has lasted for more than two millennia, and the confirmation of the quality of Floe Olei certainly contributes to the branding of Istria as a gastronomic destination.  OPG Igor Kocijančić Villa Sianna OPG Giuseppe Lupieri – Cadenela Thus, for five years in a row, Istria has had the most olive growers in the Flos Olei publication and proudly holds the title of the best olive growing region in the world.last_img read more

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first_imgThe “1.000 Valamar Trees” initiative is a continuation of the development of the Green Valamar corporate social responsibility program, within which Valamar has been systematically carrying out activities in the field of environmental protection for years. Valamar uses 100% green electricity from renewable sources, which in the period from 2015 to 2019 reduced greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 65%. In the past six years, Valamar has also installed 5.200 square meters of solar panels. Also last year, Valamar completely phased out plastic straws from use in its hotels and camps. Valamar works to raise the environmental awareness of guests, employees and the wider community, which includes actions to clean the Adriatic Sea and the coast, in which numerous sports associations participate every year. The ISO14001 environmental management system has been introduced in all Valamar facilities, and 75% of accommodation units in hotels and resorts are Travelife certified, which confirms the sustainability of operations according to the highest international standards. As many as six Valamar camps have received the prestigious European EU Ecolabel certificate this year, making them one of the most sustainable tourist resorts in Europe. “As a leader in tourism in Croatia, with the initiative ‘1.000 Valamar trees’ we give our direct contribution to the preservation of the environment and the environment in which we operate and live. We have a responsibility to create new value in a way that will preserve and develop our highly valuable natural resources for future generations. Last year, we invested around HRK 22 million in Zelena Valamar, of which almost HRK 7 million in horticulture alone. I am also glad that our employees are happy to get involved in our tree planting actions”, Said Ivana Budin Arhanić, Vice President for Business Development and Corporate Affairs of Valamar Riviera. Already in 2019, more than a thousand trees and more than 50.000 different seedlings such as tall shrubs and perennials will be planted in Valamar hotels, resorts and camps. The initiative will continue in the coming period in which Valamar intends to plant at least 1.000 trees a year and continue intensive care for the protection and restoration of indigenous plant species in its destinations. In addition to planting trees and plants, Valamar continuously takes care of the health of the existing plant fund, which includes over 30.000 trees on a total area of ​​589 hectares from Istria to Dubrovnik.center_img Valamar Riviera is launching the “1.000 Valamar Trees” initiative, the largest green initiative of its kind in Croatian tourism. As part of the initiative, Valamar will plant a minimum of a thousand new trees a year in its destinations along the Adriatic coast. With this initiative, Valamar wants to emphasize the importance of sustainable tourism development and care for the environment as an indispensable criterion for creating new value and long-term quality of the tourist offer in Croatia. Source / photo: Valamar Rivieralast_img read more

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first_imgIllustration purposes only (Image courtesy of WinGD)Turkish technical services consultancy Bulutlu Marine said it has been selected as the WinGD representative for the sale of LNG-fueled machinery in the country.According to the company’s statement, the contract was finalized with the Switzerland-based Winterthur Gas & Diesel (WinGD), for its two-stroke diesel and LNG-fueled machinery.WinGD has over 150 of its X.DF LNG engines on order, under construction or in operation.The company is focusing on boosting the adoption of LNG as fuel for marine transport and has also recently joined the LNG Marine Fuel Institute.last_img

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