May 11, 2021
  • 5:50 am Distinguishing East and West Antarctic sediment sources using the Pb isotope composition of detrital K-feldspar
  • 5:45 am Topographic shelf waves control seasonal melting near Antarctic Ice Shelf grounding lines
  • 5:56 am Harris scores 20, Nuggets rally in 4th and beat Jazz 103-88
  • 5:54 am Mitchell scores 46, Jazz beat Nuggets 118-108
  • 5:51 am 49ers have the NFL’s first-ever support dog

first_imgNew Pb analyses of K feldspars (Kfs) from Archaean–Mesozoic crystalline rocks from across the Weddell Sea region of Antarctica show Pb isotopic compositions that vary geographically. Five distinct basement provinces are defined, each with characteristic Kfs Pb compositions, and indicate that the comparison of the Pb isotopic composition of individual detrital Kfs can be used as a sedimentary provenance tool in this region. This tool is tested on Permian sandstones deposited in a retro-arc foreland basin because the potential source regions for these sandstones, the active Palaeopacific margin arc of West Antarctica and uplifted regions of now ice-covered East Antarctica, comprise rocks with markedly different Pb isotope compositions. Pb compositions of detrital Kfs from sandstone samples collected from Dronning Maud Land suggest that their provenance was entirely from within East Antarctica, while those collected from the Theron Mountains, Coats Land, were wholly derived from the active margin of West Antarctica. Kfs Pb composition of bedrock samples is largely dependent on age and because Kfs tends to only survive a single cycle of erosion, transport, deposition and diagenesis, its provenance when compared with that determined by detrital zircon geochronology, may qualify what proportion of the more robust mineral zircon has been recycled through several sedimentary cycles. Detrital zircon analyses from a Permian sandstone from the Theron Mountains suggest that 45% of its detrital zircon was recycled from pre-existing (meta)sedimentary rocks. The detrital feldspar data also indicate that Archaean and 2.1 Ga crust, with a very different Pb isotope composition to any exposed in the Weddell Sea region, is likely to exist beneath the East Antarctic Ice sheet.last_img read more

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailInstagram/the49ersfrenchie(SAN FRANCISCO) — Football fans of all sides are rooting for the latest addition to the San Francisco 49ers.Zoe, the 1-year-old French bulldog puppy, is the NFL’s first-ever emotional support dog.The dog provides comfort and support to help people with their mental health struggles, including depression, panic attacks and bipolar disorder, according to the U.S. Dog Registry.Zoe can help players overcome their pregame anxieties or post-game depression. She can even accompany the team on airplanes during trips.The 49ers’ director of player engagement, Austin Moss, and his assistant, Shelby Soltau, adopted the dog, who has almost 6,000 followers on Instagram.In her posts, Zoe loves cuddling up to football players many times her size, like quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo, offensive tackle Mike McGlinchey and defensive end Solomon Thomas.She even steals a smooch from defensive end Nick Bosa in one picture.According to the 49ers, Zoe is currently seeking official training to become a therapy dog.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. Beau Lund Written bycenter_img October 17, 2019 /Sports News – National 49ers have the NFL’s first-ever support doglast_img read more

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first_imgby Michael BennettI find Sarah minutes after the biggest show she’s ever played. How does she feel? “Everyone always asks that!” she says, and then answers “really excited but nervous at the same time”. Sarah had just headlined the first Top of the Ox, which organizers hope will become an annual event that showcases local talent. Launched early this year, Top of the Ox was a competition in which local artists could submit tracks to be made available on the competition website. Listeners then voted by text for their favorite song. Sarah happened on the competition on the Internet one day and decided to enter. “I had just come out of the studio a couple of weeks before and I thought, I’m going to upload one of my songs just for fun, see what happens.”Sarah performed on a grand piano with a string quartet as well as drums and guitar, and says she was strongly influenced by her classical training. Keane, Coldplay and Missy Higgins provide more modern influences which show in her winning song (and soon-to-be-first-single), ‘Secret’. Perhaps because of these classical influcences, her style possibly doesn’t lend itself best to live performance. By the time Sarah got to the stage in the 4½ hour event the audience had thinned out, leaving only well-dressed Christ Churchers looking like they’d never been to a gig before. Still, her music certainly is popular, beating runners-up Stornoway by more than a thousand votes. The site’s still up, so you can decide for yourself.Alternatively, you could wait till February, when her single and video will be released, part of her prize for winning the competition. After recording finishes she hopes she’ll be playing more gigs, though there are no firm plans as yet. Apart from headlining at the Academy and releasing a single, Sarah also won a thousand pounds (the part that probably sounds most exciting to most of us). Sarah told me she’d already spent a lot of the money on the concert itself hiring the grand piano and string quartet, determined to “honour the opportunity.” The rest of the money will probably be spent on a keyboard, ploughing the prize money back into her embryonic career.She’s still an Oxford finalist after all though, and I asked her how she plans to deal with that at the same time? Apparently, she’s “trying not to think about it!”last_img read more

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first_img4) Governor and First Lady Visit Bluffton Diner // January 28, 2016. Governor Mike Pence and First Lady Karen Pence stop at Richards Restaurant in Bluffton to have lunch and visit with Hoosiers. image003 image005 3) Governor Pence Marks First Anniversary of HIP 2.0 // January 27, 2016. Governor Mike Pence marks the first anniversary of the landmark approval of the Healthy Indiana Plan (HIP) 2.0 waiver alongside HIP enrollees at St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis. 6) Governor Pence Visits Veteran-owned Small Business // January 28, 2016. Governor Mike Pence visits Viridian Architectural Design, a veteran-owned small business in Fort Wayne. 2) Governor and First Lady Honor Life of Amy Beverland Elementary Principal // January 27, 2016. Governor Mike Pence and First Lady Karen Pence visit Amy Beverland Elementary School to join students, teachers and the community in commemorating the life and heroic actions of Principal Susan Jordan.center_img image004 1) Governor Pence Celebrates School Choice Week in Indiana // January 25, 2016. Governor Mike Pence welcomes hundreds of teachers, students, parents and advocates to the Statehouse to commemorate Indiana School Choice Week.image001 5) Governor Pence Visits Lancaster Central Elementary // January 28, 2016. Governor Mike Pence visits with teachers and fourth grade students at Lancaster Central Elementary School in Bluffton.image006 FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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first_img An Analysis Of A Possible $57 Million Dollar Breach Of Public Commitment By The StateIn the Spring of 2011, IU Medical School-Evansville Dean, Dr. Steve Becker and City Councilman, Dr. H. Dan Adams, began to discuss an idea that would make the new downtown IU Medical Center an educational composite for FOUR local schools in order to achieve “REAL TEAM CARE”. Ivy Tech was and still is an important part of that four school collage. When the very first preliminary rendering of the new IU Medical school campus in 2013 was presented to the Medical School Center creative team, Mayor Winnecke quickly signed off on the proposed project. The original architectural drawings had four separated, educational buildings designed in this project. The four were designed to house IU Medical School, USI Nursing School, U of E Nursing and PA programs and IVY Tech’s med tech students.After Dr. Adams explained to Skanska Contractors what “REAL TEAM CARE” concept was all about they immediately responded with the following architectural rendering posted on our cover page. We would like ask you to review the right side of the IU-Evansville Medical school building design. You will see that Ivy Tech’s med tech class rooms were indeed a major, contiguous part of the original plans for the downtown IU-Evansville Medical School campus?We distinctly remember the official vote by the IU Board of Trustee when a local TV Station carried the meeting live? A big tent was erected on the area of the proposed Medical School site with all the movers and shakers of this community in attendance. Right after the vote to approve the Downtown IU-Evansville Medical campus was taken, wine flowed like water in celebration of this event.Shortly after the vote, the promise that Ivy Tech would be a part of the new downtown Medical school seemed like a broken political promise. By including Ivy Tech in the original plans, City Council and Mayor Winnecke were able to guarantee the lump sum of $57 million, generously funding the downtown IU-Evansville Medical school complex.Sources tell us that during the mid-planning stage, Southwest Region Ivy Tech (Evansville) Chancellor, Jonathan Wienzapfel curiously demanded that the Ivy Tech educational pod be dramatically increased from 40,000 square feet to 60,000. This surprising addition really caused some concerns with the project planners. In fact, we were told at that point that Chancellor Wienzapfel’s influence with the project planners started to waiver. We have been told that the President of Ivy Tech, Dr. Sue Ellsperman, has told administrators at Ivy Tech-Evansville that any future comments concerning Ivy Tech’s role in the downtown Medical school is off limits.Mayor Winnecke and The Evansville City Council pledged to sell $57 million dollars of bonds to build a complex, state-of-the-art facility to house Indiana University Medical School-Evansville, University of Evansville Nursing and PA programs, Southern Indiana University nurses and Ivy Tech med tech students in the now-being-built downtown IU-Evansville Medical school complex. Like a thief in the night, the Indiana State Legislature quietly eliminated IVY Tech medical class room space from this project. We wonder if this shouldn’t be considered a “breach of the contract”  by adhering to the terms of the original public commitment they made?  If the entire $57 million worth of the construction bonds has been sold, we wonder if the Ivy Tech portion is being held in escrow, earning interest?We hope that the IVY Tech portion of the $57 million commitment to fund this project will be held in escrow, until the Mayor and City Council are able to resolve the issue of Ivy Tech’s role in the proposed downtown IU-Evansville Medical school project. It appears to thE CCO and many others that the State officials may have a possible “Breach of Public Commitment” issue, concerning this project.Finally, we are puzzled why members of the our Legislative delegation decided to quietly sit back and watch the State Education officials eliminated Ivy Tech’s funding from the proposed Downtown IU-Evansville Medical school without a political fight?FOOTNOTE: Todays “Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that our elected officials should push the State to include Ivy Tech in the IU-Evansville Medical school project?FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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first_imgWHAT’S ON YOUR MIND TODAY?FOOTNOTES: Our next “IS IT TRUE” will be posted on this coming Friday.Todays READERS POLL question is: Are you pleased with members of Evansville City Council voting on important issues without little discussion?Please take time and read our newest feature articles entitled “HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS” posted in our sections.If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributedFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img

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first_img58, passed away on January 31, 2018, at home. Cheryl was born in Jersey City and resided in Bayonne for many years. She worked as a hairdresser for Hoboken Hair Cutters in Hoboken. Daughter of Florence (nee: Tesauro) and the late Edward Francis Good. Sister of Edward Good, Gary Good and his Wife Sobe, and the late Deborah A. Good. Funeral arrangements by G. KEENEN O’BRIEN Funeral Home, 984 Avenue C.last_img

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first_img ISDH COVID Update 3-27 www.in.gov/isdh As will be the norm for quite some time, Friday’s report from the Indiana State Department of Health showed another large jump in confirmed cases. In the largest day-to-day increase the states total is now at 981 confirmed cases with 24 deaths. Local numbers are reported as follows:St. Joseph County- 27 confirmed, 1 deathElkhart County- 9 confirmedLaPorte County- 2 confirmedMarshall County- 4 confirmedKosciusko County- 1 confirmedIndianapolis has the highest concentration of cases with 484. The state has now received test results from 6,936 Hoosiers.The following is the full release from ISDH:INDIANAPOLIS —The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) today announced that 338 additional Hoosiers have been diagnosed with COVID-19 through testing at ISDH, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and private laboratories. That brings to 981 the total number of Indiana residents known to have the novel coronavirus following corrections to the previous day’s total. Twenty-four Hoosiers have died.To date, 6,936 tests have been reported to ISDH, up from 4,651 on Thursday.Marion County had the most new cases, at 192. Lake County had 16 new cases, while Allen, Decatur and Hamilton counties each had 13. The complete list of counties with cases is included in the ISDH COVID-19 dashboard at www.coronavirus.in.gov, which will be updated daily at 10 a.m. Cases are listed by county of residence. Private lab reporting may be delayed and will be reflected in the map and count when results are received at ISDH.The dashboard also has been updated to include age ranges of patients, as well as gender breakdowns. In addition, the following corrections have been made based on information provided to ISDH: One case has been removed from both Montgomery and Tippecanoe counties, one Hamilton County case has been moved to Madison County and one Marion County case has been moved to Howard County due to updated information regarding county of residence.Additional updates on the state’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak may be provided later today. Google+ WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+ By Carl Stutsman – March 27, 2020 0 321 Pinterest More than 300 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 in ISDH Friday update WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Previous articleTwo Michiana channels to air At Home Learning programs during pandemicNext articleSettlement reached with family of woman who died in custody of Elkhart Co. Corrections Carl Stutsman CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Facebooklast_img read more

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first_imgLast week, The Hollywood Reporter published an interview with David Crosby, which focused on politics in the United States, Donald J. Trump, the score he wrote for the new independent film Little Pink House, and more. Crosby was predictably outspoken on politics, reaffirming his stance that he doesn’t want supporters of Donald Trump and voicing his endorsement for Elizabeth Warren for president in the future.However, one standout moment came when asked about a potential Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young reunion. When asked whether Donald Trump’s election could cause a reunion, Crosby responded:Yes, it might, but we don’t get along, and we haven’t gotten along for a while. They’re all mad at me. But they all dislike Donald Trump very much, the same way I do. We dislike him intensely because he’s a spoiled child who can’t do his job. So a reunion is possible. We don’t like each other, but we like Trump a whole lot less.Hilariously, The Hollywood Reporter followed up with “Would a reuniting of the band include Neil Young?”, to which Crosby sassily responded, “Well, that’s the only way you could reunite the band, isn’t it?”You can read the full interview for yourself on The Hollywood Reporter here.[Photo: Bryan Lasky]last_img read more

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first_imgIf there’s one thing Charles Langmuir wants to give people, it’s a sense of scale.The scale of their lives in human history, of human history in the lifetime of the Earth, and of the Earth in the long, broad span of the universe.In other words, he wants to give them a little humility.“You realize how small we are and that we are [just] a particle of the whole,” said Langmuir, Higgins Professor of Geochemistry and director of Harvard’s Mineralogical and Geological Museum.A better sense of proportion might influence behavior, he said, so that people act as a part of nature rather than just users of it.“It’s really what’s needed for the environmental problems we face,” Langmuir said.Langmuir is in a somewhat privileged position to size up humanity. For the past 10 years, he worked to update “How to Build a Habitable Planet” (1985), a legendary textbook in the geosciences known for its accessibility and for the comprehensive view it takes of the Earth and its place in the universe. Earlier this month he discussed the book in a talk at the Harvard Museum of Natural History.Langmuir, who came to Harvard in 2002, spent 20 years at Columbia University as a colleague of famed geoscientist Wallace Broecker, author of the original book. Broecker, who coined the term “global warming,” said he wrote “How to Build a Habitable Planet” because he wanted people to think more broadly about the Earth, its origins, and our impact on the planet.The second edition, released this summer, has been greatly revised. As co-author, Broecker reviewed changes and revised some of the original chapters, but Langmuir did the bulk of the research and writing.The original book’s nine chapters have been expanded to 21, and the page count more than doubled, to 720 from 300. That expansion was partly because Langmuir increased the book’s scope. The original didn’t include a discussion of biology, a central aspect in the Earth’s habitability, and today considered a powerful force in transforming its physical environment. Also fresh is a discussion of exoplanets, which weren’t discovered until the 1990s; recent research on the origins of life; findings on dark matter and dark energy, now known to be enormous forces in the universe; and insights on ocean floor thermal vents — Langmuir’s specialty.“None of those very exciting developments could be in the book because they hadn’t happened yet,” Langmuir said. “Yet it still has the original vision that Wally had that was so insightful.”Broecker called the revision “a wonderful book” and said that it’s somewhat revolutionary in that it treats such a broad range of topics in depth.Langmuir’s 10 years with the book — the last seven of which he worked steadily — became something of a labor of love, giving him a ticket to explore fields far beyond his geological specialty. One side effect of the advance of science has been that scientists focus on ever-narrower slices of knowledge.“As a specialist, you can occupy less and less of the total scientific landscape,” Langmuir said. “This project allowed me to look at much of the landscape, and to me, that’s thrilling.”Though enjoyable, the task wasn’t easy. The book work came on top of his regular teaching, administrative, and research duties, which included voyages to explore Pacific Ocean hydrothermal vents and ocean ridges in the Arctic Ocean.Langmuir said work on the book had to wait until he had chunks of time — typically in the summer and often at his family’s house on Martha’s Vineyard — when he could immerse himself for a month and make progress. The book also greatly benefited from a sabbatical he spent at Oxford two years ago, where he got a lot done in local coffeehouses.Langmuir wanted to present the latest scientific knowledge and also help readers understand its origins, providing the background for why scientists think theories on evolution, climate change, the big bang, plate tectonics and others are true.In discussing global warming, for example, the book points out that volcanic emissions play a role in controlling the Earth’s climate, and that humans are releasing gases into the atmosphere at more than 100 times the background rate of volcanic emissions. In writing about the use and depletion of fossil fuels, Langmuir notes that the Earth naturally makes oil at about the same rate that it is pumped at a single Boston gas station. Similarly, in talking about evolution and extinction, the book highlights that while species of animals, plants, and other life are created slowly through evolution, the complementary aspect of the theory is species destruction. Species today are being destroyed as a consequence of human activity much faster than would occur in nature alone.“Humans arrived to find a fully stocked treasure chest that was built up over billions of years of Earth history, and that we simply took for granted and are spending like that,” Langmuir said, snapping his fingers. “This, to me, is information everyone should know.”Langmuir might not be completely done. He is thinking of diving in again to create a less technical version of the textbook aimed at general audiences — but not right away.“I want to do that, but not this year,” Langmuir said. “For seven years I’ve been fully occupied with it. I’m looking forward to catching up on [writing] my research papers.”last_img read more

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