June 23, 2021
  • 5:29 am Gatland praises battle-hardened Wales
  • 5:29 am Connacht’s Keith Matthews to win 100th cap
  • 5:26 am Stuart Lancaster: An honest man who failed on the biggest stage
  • 5:26 am A week in the life of a Sale Sharks academy player, Part Three
  • 5:25 am Round Two: Six Nations Team of the Week

first_imgEarlier in the year, an all-star reggae group, Natural Selectah, was born in Denver, Colorado. Featuring a revolving lineup of musicians, the band makes use of the many touring musicians who make the Mile Hile City their home, with the band previously featuring members from Thievery Corporation, The Motet, Pimps Of Joytime, Pretty Lights Live Band, The New Mastersounds, DubSkin, Euforquesta, SunSquabi, and more. Outside of the all-star lineup that Natural Selectah frequently boasts, one of the best aspects of the group’s shows is their covers of non-reggae songs and give them the full reggae treatment.The Nth Power Crew Welcomes Members of Antibalas, Break Science, And More For Reggae Night [Full Audio]Yesterday, Natural Selectah released a video of the group covering the Hall & Oates classic, “I Can’t Go For That.” Featuring vocalist Haile Supreme front and center, the reggae side project’s lineup for this dubby cover of Hall & Oates also sees fine performances by some of our favorite musicians from Thievery, The Motet, Pimps Of Joytime, and more. You can check out the video for yourself below, which was recorded live at the Denver recording studio, Scanhope Sound. You can also catch Natural Selectah live on September 20th at Cervantes’ Masterpiece Ballroom when the crew opens for Shaggy, with tickets available here. read more

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first_imgThe blizzard on Saturday February 21, 2015, did not stop climbers from all across Virginia gathering to compete in James Madison University’s 14th annual Reach Out Competition. The 52 dedicated climbers took to JMU’s 33-foot indoor rock wall to test themselves. Competitors were split up into two heats for each type of climbing. Bouldering took place in the morning and top roping closed out the afternoon. JMU went all out with the entertainment for the day providing warm up yoga sessions, cool t-shirts, a great swag bag, and an excellent lunch with a viewing of Almost Alpine, the Kickstarter-funded mockumentary of three Appalachian climbers making history by climbing a massive traverse in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The day was certainly one to remember.Strategy was a big part of the competition. Climbers had to get the maximum number of points between their best three boulder problems and best two top-rope problems. Points were based on number of attempts and the difficulty of the route. The competition was broken into three categories, recreational, intermediate, and advanced, for women and men.ReachOut2As the morning bouldering heats kicked off, cheering from the crowds could be heard in the background as the first heat of climbers navigated routes and those on deck discussed possible beta. One climber that was resting between climbs talked with me about how energized climbing competitions are. He said he loves to see competitors cheering each other on and sharing critical advice with each other even if it might cost them a place on the podium. Sportsmanship at its finest if you ask me — each competitor wanting their counterparts to perform their best knowing that the true challenge is reaching one’s own peak performance. The encouraging attitude made for one heck of a good time as we took on the wall!ReachOut3The bouldering routes were full of technical foot placements and powerful movements. A couple of proud first timers mentioned completing a challenging route in the bouldering cave where they had to climb onto the ceiling, a job well done indeed! At the end of the bouldering session there were some great discussions on what type of climbing people preferred and some good stories were shared about recent ice climbing adventures on the way to lunch. The lunch hour for some was an opportunity for yoga and cardio to work out pumped forearms, for others it was spent hanging out and watching Almost Alpine. Either way at the end of the hour, the top roping sessions began and with the scores from bouldering being so close together, it was still anyone’s chance for first! The top roping utilized a lot of the built in features on the JMU wall and forced some quick decisions about how to grab certain holds not visible from the ground. The wall was certainly a force to be reckoned with and it was clear the route setters put in a great deal of effort for the event. Each bracket had a series of challenging routes that proved to be the deciding factor of the day.ReachOut1Plenty of fun was had as we all got to try our hand at reaching the top! The JMU Reach Out Climb is an annual public event that takes place during a Saturday in late February with registration opening up in early January. Get to climbing and we will see you at the next one!A big shout out to JMU’s Adventure crew, and all of the event supporters, including the sponsor of the day, Walkabout Outfitters for making it all possible! An even bigger shout out and congratulations to the weekend warriors that made it to the podium! Recreation Men’s: Schieber (1st) Chang (2nd) Sternfeld (3rd) – Recreation Women’s: Sargeant (1st) Barclay (2nd) Skelly (3rd) – Intermediate Men’s: Elliot (1st) Nooney (2nd) Lee (3rd) – Intermediate Women’s: Fink (1st) Borowy (2nd) Merian (3rd) Mjelde (3rd) – Advanced Men’s: Peterson (1st) Reese (2nd) McGrady (3rd) – Advanced Women’s: Gervasi (1st)###Photo cred: Erik Baileylast_img read more

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first_imgThe first of a seven race card gets going at 6pm.last_img

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first_imgIt’s been almost a week since the NHL paused its schedule due to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) throughout North America. As the league ponders its next steps, fans and pundits are wondering about the fate of the remaining schedule and the playoffs.Based on the recommendation by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of a 60-day shutdown of large events involving more than 50 people, The Hockey News’ Jared Clinton believes it’ll be mid-May at the earliest before the NHL returns to action. On Monday, the league indicated it hopes to open a training-camp period 45 days into the period covered by the CDC’s directive. TSN’s Gino Reda reported the league is eyeing a return to action as early as May 15. That would create a serious salary-cap nightmare for several NHL clubs, potentially forcing them to gut their rosters with cost-cutting trades and contract buyouts. However, LeBrun cited multiple sources claiming the league and the PA wouldn’t allow that to happen. He believes both sides would agree in this exceptional circumstance to an artificial cap for next season that would satisfy all sides.There is a precedent for this. Following the 2012-13 lockout, they agreed to set the cap for the following season at the same number ($64.3 million) as it was in 2011-12. Perhaps they’ll do the same this time around and keep the cap at $81.5 million. Nevertheless, the New York Post’s Larry Brooks feels a flat cap could still hurt several clubs. He speculates the NHL and the NHLPA could implement amnesty buyouts that wouldn’t count against a club’s cap payroll.For now, the rest of this NHL season remains at the mercy of the pandemic. It’ll be several weeks before the fate of the 2020-’21 campaign becomes clearer. Using that as it’s current guideline, understanding that the situation may well change before then, the NHL is moving forward with a plan that could see them open camps as soon as April 29th.That could be followed by a 15 day camp, & games could begin by the middle of May.— Gino Reda (@GinoRedaTSN) March 16, 2020What that means for the remainder of the NHL’s regular-season schedule has yet to be determined. The NHL last week released a statement of its intent to resume the schedule as soon as possible, hoping to complete the season and crown a Stanley Cup champion. Each club was also reportedly asked to determine availability in their home arena through late July.Returning to action in mid-May also raises questions over what the season will look like. Completing the remaining games could result in a compressed timetable involving numerous back-to-back contests. Even with a two-week training camp, that demanding schedule could take a physical toll upon players emerging from a lengthy layoff.MORE: When Stanley Cup wasn’t awarded | 1919 Stanley Cup FinalIf playing out the remaining schedule isn’t feasible, perhaps a shortened “play-in” will be staged to allow clubs jockeying for wild-card berth an opportunity to clinch post-season berths. A rumored option would involve a 24-team playoff format involving an equal number of participants from each conference.Failing that, the league could be forced to scrap the regular season and start the playoffs based on the current standings. A full playoff schedule of four best-of-seven rounds could see the Stanley Cup awarded by late July.One pressing factor will be the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo from July 24 to Aug. 6. The Athletic’s Pierre LeBrun believes the last thing the league wants is to have the Stanley Cup Final staged at the same time. That could mean setting July 23 as the final date for the playoffs’ completion.Pushing ahead the schedule will also affect the NHL’s off-season timetable. The 2020 NHL Draft Lottery, set for Apr. 9, must be pushed forward by two months. The annual Draft Combine in Buffalo (June 1-6) and the draft in Montreal (June 26-27) will also be rescheduled. The latter could become a stripped-down affair similar to the 2005 NHL Draft following a season-killing lockout.MORE: A look back at the history of NHL interruptionsThe annual July 1 start to the free-agency period will also be pushed forward, perhaps to Aug. 1. Players slated to become restricted or unrestricted free agents on teams participating in the playoffs at that point could see their contracts extended for a month by mutual consent between the league and the NHL Players’ Association.Ensuring this season ends with a Stanley Cup champion isn’t the only consideration behind the league’s determination to resume the season. Among North America’s major professional sports leagues, the NHL is the most reliant on gate revenue. The Athletic’s Scott Powers and Mark Lazerus reported commissioner Gary Bettman informed the league’s board of governors that canceling the season would result in $1 billion in lost revenue.With the salary cap tied to hockey-related revenue, the recent projections of next season’s cap reaching between $84 million and $88 million seem unreachable now. Even if the league finishes the season with a truncated schedule, the loss of revenue might push the salary cap below the current $81.5 million.last_img read more

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