June 24, 2021
  • 5:29 am Gatland praises battle-hardened Wales
  • 5:29 am Connacht’s Keith Matthews to win 100th cap
  • 5:26 am Stuart Lancaster: An honest man who failed on the biggest stage
  • 5:26 am A week in the life of a Sale Sharks academy player, Part Three
  • 5:25 am Round Two: Six Nations Team of the Week

first_imgThe Nuclear Safeguards Act addresses the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom), an international organisation that governs the peaceful use of nuclear energy within the EU. The passing of the Act and today’s consultation on a new safeguards regime provide a clear signal to the public, industry and international partners that the UK is on track to meet its international commitments from day one of exit.Nuclear safeguards are important processes through which the UK demonstrates to the international community that civil nuclear material is not diverted into military or weapons programmes.Today’s announcement comes just weeks after the UK’s commitment to international safeguards and nuclear non-proliferation was reaffirmed in Vienna, with the signing of 2 new safeguards agreements with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).These key agreements with the IAEA – of which the UK is a founding member – are another major milestone in Euratom exit preparations and provide the basis for civil nuclear trading arrangements. This step will be welcomed by the industry in the UK and trading partners around the world.Further progress towards Euratom Exit has been set out in a Quarterly update to Parliament published on 28 June, which outlines several key achievements, including the Office for Nuclear Regulation’s good progress on preparations for implementing the UK’s safeguards regime and the confirmation that all Euratom specific text in the Withdrawal Agreement has now been agreed.The UK signed a new Nuclear Cooperation Agreement (NCA) with the United States of America in May, which will allow the UK and US to continue their mutually beneficial civil nuclear cooperation when the current Euratom arrangements cease to apply to the UK.This US-UK NCA is expected to be the first in a series of new international agreements ensuring uninterrupted cooperation and trade following the UK’s exit from Euratom.Details on how to respond to the consultation and to register interest for the workshops, can be found on the consultation web page.Notes to editorsThe Nuclear Safeguards Act 2018 amends the Energy Act 2013 to: government sets out the details of new nuclear safeguards regime nuclear safeguards legislation receives Royal Assent – UK on track to be able to meet international commitments once Euratom arrangements cease to apply in the UK progress provides certainty to the civil nuclear industry and international partners as the UK prepares for Euratom exit provide the Office for Nuclear Regulation with a new safeguards function create new powers for the Secretary of State to put in place regulations setting out the detail of the domestic safeguards regime The Nuclear Safeguards Act is one of the first pieces of legislation to go through Parliament in preparation for EU Exit and is yet another major milestone in our work to prepare the civil nuclear industry for Euratom exit, ensuring continuity from day 1. We are setting out proposals for the detail of our own UK framework for safeguards, demonstrating our readiness for EU Exit.center_img New proposals on the detail of a new UK nuclear safeguards regime to replace the current regime provided by Euratom, have been set out in a consultation launched today (Monday 9 July 2018).The consultation sets out nuclear safeguards regulations that would be made using the powers granted by the Nuclear Safeguards Act, which last month became one of the first pieces of EU Exit legislation to complete its passage through Parliament and receive Royal Assent.Business and Industry Minister, Richard Harrington said: The Act also creates a limited power for the Secretary of State to amend 3 existing pieces of legislation to update references to the new IAEA agreements.The UK’s Voluntary Offer Agreement and Additional Protocol were signed in Vienna on 7 June.The UK has been a member of the IAEA since its formation in 1957.The signing of new bilateral agreements with the IAEA, a Voluntary Offer Agreement and Additional Protocol, will replace existing trilateral arrangements between the IAEA, Euratom and the UK.The new agreements ensure that the IAEA retains its right to inspect all civil nuclear facilities, and continues to receive current safeguards reporting, thereby ensuring that international verification of our safeguards activity continues to be robust. Such agreements have been put in place on a voluntary basis by the 5 nuclear-weapon states parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.The new safeguards regime to be established in the UK will be operated by the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR). The ONR already regulates nuclear safety and security in the UK and has been making preparation to replace Euratom as the regulator of safeguards.last_img read more

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first_imgOver the past decade, scientists have produced a flurry of studies exploring the role of genetic (nature) and environmental factors (nurture) in youth depression, but there has been little consensus on how depression is jointly impacted by specific genes and external factors, such as poverty, abuse, and negative family relationships.The lack of a clear understanding of how genes and environments both contribute to childhood depression led Erin Dunn, postdoctoral research fellow and recent graduate of the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), and her colleagues to do a comprehensive review of studies that tested for gene-environment interaction in youth depression. Their goal was to systematically identify these studies, examine the methods used, and summarize findings to guide future studies. The review was published December, 2011 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (JCPP). Read the abstract.Dunn, a former Richmond Fellow at the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, has had a longstanding interest in children’s mental health ever since teaching in early childhood and elementary school settings, where she saw students with a variety of mental health issues.last_img read more

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first_imgThe European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA) has been urged to create concrete differences in its proposal to the European Commission on pensions transfers across the EU.Reponses from PensionsEurope and the Actuarial Association of Europe (AAE) said they welcomed EIOPA’s engagement with the industry on the matter, with the actuaries generally supporting the supervisor’s work.In January, EIOPA launched a consultation on good practices on individual transfer of supplementary occupational pension rights after being prompted by the Commission to deliver advice.The Commission is looking to extend transferable rights across the EU with savers taking occupation pension pots with them as they move across member states. EIOPA identified eight main issues with cross-border transfers and set out 14 ‘good practices’ to over come them.These included allowing transfers to remain at the discretion of schemes, with stakeholders agreeing on a framework to cover as much second-pillar savings as possible.Also included were harmonised requirements for domestic and cross-border transfers, set timeframes, limited member involvement and objective criteria for rejecting transfers.However, PensionsEurope said the consultation’s use of the word ‘supplementary’ was misleading and covered both workplace and personal pensions.“We would like to emphasise the importance of not mixing these two different systems,” the organisation said.“Transfers between workplace pension schemes and personal pension schemes are often, even domestically, not possible due to the different tax arrangements and the different setup of a scheme.”It also called for the word ‘rights’ to be replaced by capital given one scheme may not be able to provide the same outcome with a matching capital value.PensionsEurope also said EIOPA’s and the Commision’s work should first focus on ensuring domestic transfers could take place, before tackling the complex cross-border space.Also, it called for workplace pension set-ups to consider the overall risk when considering whether to allow a transfer.This would matters such as the scheme’s the funding level, interest rates and biometric aspects, PensionsEurope said.It also urged caution on transfers taking into account transfer values and taxation.“Good practices on the calculation of transfer value and taxation have not been proposed in this consultation, but are still important – and even fundamental – obstacles to the practice of transfers.“That there are no good practices on these issues shows how complex it is to tackle these obstacles,” it said.The AAE said while many of the good practices identified by EIOPA existed within some member states, it did indentify areas to make transfers more efficient.Chairman of AAE’s pensions committee, Falco Valkenburg, said it was positive EIOPA treated the transfers as a choice, and a not a requirement for members.The AAE would not support a recommendation that small DC accounts should be forced to transfer, he said.He also noted the Commission’s proposals would work well with its separate EU-wide pensions tracking initiative, TTYPE.last_img read more

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first_img Tweet 27 Views   no discussions Share NewsRegional CARICOM civil society-government forum agrees on structure for improved interaction by: – November 14, 2011 Sharecenter_img Sharing is caring! Share CARICOM flag. Image via: flags.netPARAMARIBO, Suriname — Representatives of civil society and regional governments have endorsed a structure for improved interaction among decision-making organs and bodies of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), governments and civil society. The endorsement came at the conclusion of a technical meeting of civil society and government representatives in Paramaribo, Suriname, 7-8 November. The meeting was the last activity of the CARICOM Civil Society Project. The project, which was supported by the European Union (EU) and executed by the CARICOM Secretariat, began in 2010, and was aimed at promoting civil society participation and engagement in the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME). The two-day meeting was a follow-up activity to national and regional consultations that were held as part of the project. Delegates at the meeting included social and economic partners in the region and senior officials of various government ministries of member states. Its objective was the consideration of a regional strategic framework (RSF) and plan of action. Participants got the opportunity to exchange views on how best CARICOM stakeholders could work together to achieve common development goals.Delegates adopted the new structure for dialogue and partnership based on one of the options set out in the RSF. The options were widely seen as attempts to fulfill the mandates of the conference of heads of government of CARICOM as articulated in the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas, the CARICOM Charter of Civil Society, and the 2002 Liliendaal Statement of Principles on Forward Together. Of particular importance, was the latter’s recognition that “the establishment of mechanisms for continuous dialogue between the conference of heads of government of the Caribbean Community and civil society is an essential way to complement relevant programmes to ensure social reconstruction, cohesiveness, peace, poverty reduction and equity that could enhance regional integration and make the community more economically viable.”The highlight of the forum was a break-out session on the first day, where participants were split into working groups to brain-storm on three dimensions of the emergent framework, namely: (i) outcomes desired from the engagement process; (ii) a proposed structure to facilitate the achievements of these outcomes; and (iii) modalities for financing the operationalisation of the model. An outcomes document generated at the technical meeting takes into account elements of the outcomes, structure, and financing of the framework. The framework will be brought to the attention of the relevant councils of the Community.Caribbean News Nowlast_img read more

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first_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 ‘I had no idea until I saw the man with the knife. I had no clothes on and I remained underneath the sheets. ‘They told me not to move and they said, ‘Where’s the money and the jewellery’. I let them know the money was in the left-side drawer. ‘They all had weapons on them. ‘One of them had an orange machete, it was like a sword.’ They trapped Miss Hickman in her bedroom before swiping a Rolex watch and the keys to Gray’s Mercedes, which was not there as he was at training. CCTV footage captured the balaclava-clad thugs pacing past a framed football shirt in the hallway of the gated property. Ms. Hickman said in a court statement: ‘They made a comment that my boyfriend was ‘a gangbanger’ and asked what time he was back. Loading… A Birmingham Crown Court on Wednesday heard how the robbers which included a father and son had been involved in a string of raids across the West Midland in the last six months.  They were jailed for a combined 85 years by the court. Hickman told jurors: ‘I was asleep when someone came into my bedroom.Advertisement A five-man robbery gang who broke into the mansion of Leicester City player, Demarai Gray, have been jailed for a total of 85 years. Gray’s girlfriend had to move out following the incident Gray was at training but his partner Emma Hickman was at home with the couple’s six-week-old baby boy when the robbers burst into the property last March. The fearful incident made Hickman move out after the robbers made away with £24,000 in cash and jewellery. Nicholas and son Cory were part of the robbery ganglast_img read more

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