June 24, 2021
  • 5:29 am Gatland praises battle-hardened Wales
  • 5:29 am Connacht’s Keith Matthews to win 100th cap
  • 5:26 am Stuart Lancaster: An honest man who failed on the biggest stage
  • 5:26 am A week in the life of a Sale Sharks academy player, Part Three
  • 5:25 am Round Two: Six Nations Team of the Week

first_img United KingdomEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsInternational bodies ViolenceFreedom of expression News to go further March 14, 2018 Find out more RSF_en Journalists, citizen journalists, and media workers around the world have faced growing threats to their safety in recent years, with more than 700 journalists killed over the past decade in connection with their work, far too often with impunity. This alarming trend is all too present throughout the Commonwealth states.In the letter to May, RSF outlines recent cases of violence against journalists in Commonwealth states, including the murders in 2017 of Daphne Caruana Galizia in Malta; Gauri Lankesh, Navin Gupta, Shantanu Bhowmick, and Sudip Datta Bhaumik in India; and Abdul Hakim Shimul in Bangladesh. The letter also highlights the abductions of journalists Charles Etukuri in Uganda and Azori Gwanda in Tanzania, both of whom remain missing, and the attempted armed kidnapping of Taha Siddiqui in Pakistan, as well as a string of attacks in Trinidad and Tobago, including assaults on Guardian journalists Kristian De Silva and Sascha Wilson.“Violent attacks against journalists are taking place with alarming frequency across the Commonwealth. We call on the UK to take leadership on this crucial issue during its Chairmanship, to reaffirm the Commonwealth’s Charter commitment to freedom of expression and provide much-needed protection to journalists reporting information in the public interest”, said RSF UK Bureau Director Rebecca Vincent.The Commonwealth of Nations is an intergovernmental organisation of 53 member states spanning Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and the Pacific, most of which are former territories of the British Empire. The Commonwealth’s commitment to freedom of expression is affirmed in its Charter, and has been declared as a focus of the forthcoming Commonwealth Summit agenda on promoting respect for the rule of law, good governance, and access to justice for all. The UK will take over Chairmanship at the Heads of Government Meeting starting 16 April 2018.The full text of the letter is available to download below. November 22, 2017 Find out more News September 20, 2017 Find out more Receive email alerts Joint open letter to Mr Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission: Call for EU action to protect journalists Newscenter_img United KingdomEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsInternational bodies ViolenceFreedom of expression Organisation March 16, 2018 – Updated on March 21, 2018 RSF urges UK to prioritise safety of journalists in Commonwealth Chairmanship One month ahead of the UK assuming Chairmanship of the Commonwealth in April 2018, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) Secretary General Christophe Deloire has written to Prime Minister Theresa May in a letter dated 16 March urging her to prioritise the promotion of safety of journalists during the UK’s two-year mandate. News Related documents rsf_open_letter_to_theresa_may_on_uk_commonwealth_chairmanship.pdfPDF – 373.68 KB Follow the news on United Kingdom RSF hails new UN resolution on journalists’ safety French president calls for UN special representative for journalists’ safety Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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first_imgBest start to the termWith a distinct absence of plays kicking off Trinity Term, there is disappointingly little competition for this slot. Be this as it may, let it take nothing away from Emma Jenkinson’s sterling performance this week, as she takes on the lead role of Sarah in Harold Pinter’s The Lover. In doing so, she has proved equal to her previously high standards. Audiences might well remember her as the delightfully bitchy hostess in Mike Leigh’s Abigail’s Party at the O’Reilly, a role which Jenkinson performed in true Hyacinth Bucket fashion. The diversity of her talent was demonstrated by her “flawless portrayal” of Maggie last year in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, a role that demanded a quite different style.Casting disaster of the weekAs any director will undoubtedly tell you, casting is an integral part of the production process. It requires careful attention and deliberation to find the right man for the right role. No stranger to controversy, Tom Littler has demonstrated this week that it just doesn’t do to be too picky. Having been unable to find anyone talented enough to meet the high standards of professionalism he appears to have demanded for the role of Thomas a Becket, he has entirely abandoned his forthcoming production of Murder in the Cathedral, due to have taken place in Christ Church Chapel. That said, Littler soon may not be alone in his plight. This term’s OUDS calender is typically crowded, and Oxford’s top stars are in short supply. With several actors having already taken on a number of productions, and others sidelined by exam commitments, it may be time for some new talent to step forward.And another thing…Ah, Burlesk. It was such a talking point last term, but can the enigmatic and at times rather hit-andmiss Jongleurs regular engage and regain a Trinity audience? For a start, they’ve moved to a Monday night slot starting at 10pm, which affords them the opportunity of presenting a longer performance. According to Sheridan Edwards, the show’s coordinator, this will consist of up to 75% more material including some rather topical, if somewhat unorthodox, party political broadcasts. A lot of Burlesk’s custom seems to be coming from the organisation of launch parties for student theatrical productions; look out for that of Orpheus in the Underworld in 5th Week. They will also be branching out from the Jongleurs venue, playing at the Christ Church and St Cross balls, before heading to the Edinburgh Festival and then on a mini-tour of London after the summer season. So the future does look bright in terms of demand; but the jury is still out as to whether the performative strength of the show can ever live up to its slick marketing.ARCHIVE: 0th week TT 2005last_img read more

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first_img Read Full Story Epidemiologists at Harvard have a long legacy of groundbreaking findings, from a 19th-century study on the effectiveness of bloodletting as a treatment for pneumonia to recent work on the role various dietary factors play in chronic disease risk. Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) faculty, alumni, and students gathered to reflect on the past and future of epidemiology at Harvard during the Cutter Symposium, held on November 8, 2013, as part of the School’s Centennial celebration.Alfredo Morabia, a historian and professor of epidemiology at Columbia University, kicked off the event with a lively historical overview of HSPH’s Department of Epidemiology—which he called a “methodological beacon” in an “adventurous discipline.” Morabia charged the packed audience in HSPH’s Snyder Auditorium with doing a better job of recording its history. In researching his speech, Morabia was surprised to find scant documentation in the archives at Countway Library—even for the 31-year tenure of Chair Brian MacMahon, who led the department until 1989. However, Morabia’s interviews with more than 20 faculty members, former chairs, and others connected to the department yielded a wealth of information.Morabia noted that the University’s first epidemiologist was James Jackson, a professor of clinical medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS) in the early 19th century and the first physician at Massachusetts General Hospital. Employing epidemiologic methods that were rare at the time, according to Morabia, Jackson found evidence countering the common practice of bloodletting for the treatment of pneumonia.last_img read more

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first_imgEIA: Renewables could overtake U.S. gas generation by 2034 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Platts:Renewable energy is projected not only to crowd out coal-fired and nuclear generation but also to overtake natural gas as the dominant fuel for power generation by 2045, according to the main reference case the U.S. Energy Information Administration put forth Jan. 29.Gas-fired combined-cycle generation capacity is expected to be “added steadily throughout the projection period to meet rising demand,” the EIA said in its 2020 Annual Energy Outlook. However, the reference case shows gas use for electricity dipping slightly to 36% of the power mix in 2050, compared with 37% in 2019. A year earlier, the outlook saw gas growing from 34% of the mix in 2018 to 39% by 2050.The agency’s reference case assumes cost reductions for renewables will gradually taper off. But the EIA’s “low renewables cost” case assumes renewables achieve overnight capital costs in 2050 that are 40% lower than in the reference case.Under that scenario, renewable generation inches ahead of gas in 2034 and continues an upward trajectory toward providing nearly 3 trillion kWh of electricity by 2050. Gas-fired generation, in that case, remains flat, supplying between 1.5 trillion and 1.6 trillion kWh throughout the projection period. The case assuming lower costs for renewables expects gas-fired generation to start leveling off in the 2020s.Gas prices in the reference case stay below $4/MMBtu through 2035, with abundant lower-cost resources, mostly in Permian Basin tight oil plays. Across all cases, the outlook projects gas production will exceed consumption, enabling increased exports even though production growth slows to less than 1% a year in the 2020s in the reference case.Gas consumption slows after reaching 31.9 Tcf in 2020 and stays flat through 2030, then rises 1% a year with higher power sector and industrial sector use. The industrials category, which wraps in LNG feedgas, is the biggest consumer after 2021.[Maya Weber and Jasmin Melvin]More: EIA: Gas-fired power to lose out to renewables, even with sustained gas outputlast_img read more

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first_imgUG12211952 VOLLEYBALL110 BASKETBALL011 BEACH VOLLEYBALL200 TABLE TENNIS541 UNER0011 UHAS0000 UMAT0000 ATHLETICS8118 UPSA0000 KNUST1236 HANDBALL100 UEW came second, managing 43 laurels in total with 15 being gold, 11 silver, and 17 bronze medals.University for Development Studies finished third after an impressive display in the athletics category and ladies’ female football team.UDS managed 39 insignia at the end of all events with 13 gold, 11 silver, and 15 bronze medals.The host school, University of Ghana finished 4th on the medal ranking with 52 medals but had more silver and bronze laurels. The UG gathered 12 gold, 21 silver, and 19 bronze medals.Overall medal table: GIMPA0000 UDS13111539center_img GIJ0000 DISCIPLINE                           GOLDSILVERBRONZE UEW15111743 GOAL BALL101 NETBALL100 The University of Cape Coast (UCC) has once again been crowned the overall champions of the just ended Ghana Universities Sports Association (GUSA) Games.UCC accumulated 64 medals in total at the 26th GUSA Games to beat the likes of the University of Education, Winneba (UEW), University for Development Studies (UDS) and host school, University of Ghana (UG).UCC has now won every GUSA Games since 2014, solidifying its dominance in University Games.The team dominated the Men’s Football, Men’s Handball, Men’s Tennis, Table Tennis, Badminton, and Netball.The 2014, 2016 and 2018 GUSA Games champions accrued 28 gold medals, 23 silver medals, and 13 bronze medals in the 2020 edition of the university games.Breakdown of UCC’s medal haul: UCC28231364 UNIVERSITIESGOLDSILVERBRONZETOTAL HOCKEY100 TENNIS431 BADMINTON330 FOOTBALL100  Background:Eleven schools participated in 12 sporting disciplines at the 26th edition of the GUSA Games which was hosted by the University of Ghana, Legon between January 3 to January 19, 2020.Participating schools include University of Ghana (UG), University of Cape Coast (UCC), Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), University for Development Studies (UDS), University of Education, Winneba (UEW), University of Energy and Natural Resources (UNER), University for Mines and Technology (UMaT), University of Health and Allied Sciences (UHAS), University of Professional Studies, Accra (UPSA).Ghana Institute of Journalism (GIJ) and Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA) made their debut appearance at the GUSA Games to complete the list of schools that sort for glory.Some images from the closing ceremony:last_img read more

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first_imgHow OKR’s Completely Transformed Our Culture rieva lesonsky Related Posts What Nobody Teaches You About Getting Your Star… Not every tech startup enjoys the luxury of launching in Silicon Valley — or Silicon Alley, or Austin, Texas, or another high-tech hotspot.What’s the solution?Instead of waiting for someone to offer a helping hand, or packing up the U-Haul and moving across the counryy, try taking the entrepreneurial approach and turning your home town into a high-tech startup community. Brad Feld author of Startup Communities: Building an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem in Your City, says it can be done.Feld, who has over 20 years of experience as both an entrepreneur and an early-stage investor, is a co-founder of tech accelerator TechStars and knows whereof he speaks. He bases his book on the lessons he’s learned from 20 years in the vibrant startup community of Boulder, Colorado.Too often, though, cities trying to build high-tech startup communities make one or more key mistakes that keep their plans from reaching fruition. According to Feld, here are the six common problems that afflict — but don’t have to squelch — startup communities:1. The Patriarch Problem: Is your city’s startup infrastructure ruled by “old white guys”? If your ability to get funding depends on who you know, where you went to school and where you’ve worked, your city might be suffering from the Patriarch Problem. If funding is based solely on what you do, congratulations – you’re in a vibrant startup community. Getting beyond the patriarch problem is tough (in the worst case, you’ve got to wait for people to die), but can be done if enough leaders of the startup community decide they’re going to ignore the patriarchs and just keep doing what they’re doing.2. Capital Shortage: If you’re complaining about the shortage of local capital in your city, Feld’s got news for you: Entrepreneurs everywhere — yes, even in Silicon Valley — are complaining just as loudly about the same thing. “Let it go,” advises Feld. Instead, just keep doing what you’re doing, and if you do it well enough, you’ll attract capital from around the country.3. We’re From The Government, We’re Here To Help: While Feld acknowledges that government can provide some help in constructing and supporting startup communities, entrepreneurs who rely too heavily on government will go nowhere fast. “Government moves at a much slower pace than entrepreneurs,” Feld warns. Just keep doing what you’re doing — don’t wait for Uncle Sam.4. Do I Know You? A startup community that’s suspicious of newcomers is likely to die on the vine. “In Boulder, when someone new shows up in town, the entrepreneurs swarm them… to make the person feel welcome,” Feld writes. In contrast, if your city makes newbies “earn their way into the hierarchy,” you’re basically creating your own Patriarch Problem.5. Feeders Trying To Be Leaders: Feld identifies government, universities and venture capitalists as “feeders” who can help support an entrepreneurial ecosystem. The problem occurs when feeders try to be “leaders” and take charge of entrepreneurial growth. A successful entrepreneurial ecosystem must be led by entrepreneurs themselves, says Feld, who cautions that when feeders try to take charge of entrepreneurial growth, they typically slow it down with committees, initiatives and other photo ops that create a lot of noise but do nothing — essentially the antithesis of entrepreneurial behavior.6. Risk Aversion: Are you afraid of putting your time and effort into growing your own startup community — especially when you’re busy creating your own startup, too? You can’t create a startup environment without taking risks, says Feld. His advice: Jump right in and try stuff, but always set a time limit. If your effort doesn’t work out in that time frame, try something else. Trying — and even failing — without fear is a hallmark of a vibrant startup community.See a common thread here? “Just start doing stuff and keep doing it” is Feld’s entrepreneurial mantra. Startup Communities clearly conveys the contagious sense of energy, enthusiasm and possibility that’s at the heart of the most successful startup communities.center_img Tags:#StartUp 101#Venture Funding China and America want the AI Prize Title: Who … How to Get Started in China and Have Successlast_img read more

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