July 28, 2021
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first_img1 Mauricio Pochettino’s side lost 5-1 on aggregate Tottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino hopes his young side have learned a valuable lesson in their Europa League exit at the hands of Borussia Dortmund.Spurs were beaten 2-1 on the night – 5-1 on aggregate – by the side sitting second in the Bundesliga.Pochettino hopes to be leading his side into games against opponents of the same calibre more often next season by qualifying for the Champions League and believes nights like this one will be an important education for his players.He told BT Sport 1: “I’m very disappointed we’re out of the Europa League but we need to recognise we played against a very good team (playing at) a Champions League level, because Borussia Dortmund is one of the best teams in Europe.“I think we improved a lot, learned a lot from last week in Germany. We competed and we need to take positives.“We have a lot of young players that need to feel what it means to compete in Europe and I think for the team it was a good test and we can take positive things.”Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang scored twice for Dortmund, while Son Heung-min netted a consolation for the hosts following a defensive error from Neven Subotic.Pochettino admitted Aubameyang’s opener all but ended Tottenham’s chances.He added: “Your expectation is to turn the tie but against a very good team it was difficult. We tried to score and they score an unbelievable goal from Aubameyang and this killed a little bit our possibility to come into the tie.”last_img read more

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first_imgSANTA CLARA — The last time Baker Mayfield and Nick Bosa met on a football field, the quarterback led his Oklahoma Sooners to an upset win over Bosa’s Ohio State Buckeyes.After the 31-16 victory, a brazen Mayfield planted an Oklahoma flag at the 50-yard line at Ohio Stadium.Under the bright lights at Levi’s Stadium on Monday, Bosa did the planting. There was no Buckeye flag on the grass in Santa Clara, but instead an outline of Mayfield’s body.In the best game of the rookie’s young pro …last_img

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first_imgThe January 11 Google Doodle pays tribute to South African author and anti-apartheid activist, Alan Paton – commemorating his 115th birthday.The Google Doodle depicting South African writer Alan Paton on a train journey through the South African countryside, a trip that inspired the idea behind his best work, Cry, The Beloved Country. (Image: Google)CD AndersonSouth African writer Alan Paton, author of the classic South African novel Cry, The Beloved Country was born on 11 January 1903. Google celebrates the life and work of the author with a commemorative Doodle on the search engine’s homepage.The Doodle depicts Paton looking out on the South African countryside during a train journey that many believe was the moment the idea for his most famous work was first conceived. Paton had worked as a teacher and later as the headmaster of the Diepkloof prison for young black offenders where he took note of the effects of racial discrimination on South African youth.Through a number of his own progressive educational and social programmes at the facility, Paton hoped to reduce the suffering of prisoners, some as young as nine, and help them re-enter society on a better footing than most had arrived.Google, in a statement on the unveiling of the Doodle, hoped that highlighting Paton and his works on such a ubiquitous portal for many young people using the internet, his life story would reach new audiences.Other notable South Africans who have featured on Google Doodles in the past include Nadine Gordimer, Nelson Mandela and Steve Biko.For more information on Alan Paton, read these Brand South Africa articles below:South African literature31 books every South African should readSource: Google, eNCAWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCThere was some positive trade news last week. Mexico and the U.S. may be able to avert trade issues — which is positive for corn — and Chinese officials are coming to Washington to resume talks, which could help soybeans.Bean futures are reacting quickly to any trade news. Many suspect if the trade dispute was resolved, beans would rally $1 per bushel. Because of that upside potential there is usually a quick surge in prices because so many fear of missing out on the potential rally.The basis or cash market isn’t reacting as well though for beans. The west coast export facilities’ bean basis is at least 60 cents below normal levels, which is putting downward pressure on basis throughout the Midwest. This suggests a lot of beans that normally go for export need to find a new home. That has put downward pressure on the processors bids here in the Midwest. I’m surprised this hasn’t spilled over into the futures market yet.Some beans purchased for export to China before the tariff may still be shipped, because it can be cheaper to just pay the tariffs than find other buyers in the current trading climate. Exporters do not want to take on any more ownership until they know they can actually sell it to someone who will move it.Usually the basis market is more cautious than the futures market. I’m not looking for basis to improve much until there is a more firm resolution in the tariffs with China. In the meantime, elevator managers are concerned about where all the grain from harvest will go. Some have hinted that basis may get worse before it gets better. Increases in futures prices may be countered by a drop in basis levels. What to store at harvestI have over 100% of on-farm storage and I highly recommend that most farmers should as well. Having 100% on-farm storage provides farmers with a low-risk way to maximize their profit potential and allows for more flexibility in their marketing plans. It also makes the decision of what to store at harvest time simple.Still, many farmers are resistant to it and ask me how they should prioritize their crops with only partial on-farm storage. The following illustrates how I analyze which crops I would store first. Examples below are based upon the local market conditions of where my farm is located in southeast Nebraska. Consideration 1: Futures values don’t matter when deciding which crop should be stored.This runs contrary to what many farmers think, but it’s true, futures don’t matter at all. Only basis opportunity, market carry and interest on an operating note have an impact on storage decisions.Futures values shouldn’t be considered because I can always sell my grain and then immediately re-own futures on paper and maintain the same market downside risk and/or upside potential. In other words, the risk is exactly the same if I have unpriced grain in a bin as it is to have a long futures position on paper.I know that some people will suggest re-ownership through options is a better way to do this, but that is conversation about which risk management strategy is better. Both ways are trying to accomplish the same end goal of capturing upside potential in the market. That is NOT my focus with this newsletter. Consideration 2: BasisBasis is the difference between the price on the CBOT and local bid. Basis is constantly moving throughout the year. The trend is usually that it moves up over time from harvest until sometime in the summer. To understand how and why basis affects storage decisions, following provides a real example of 2017 basis levels near my farm. Local Bean Processor Bids:At Harvest Last Year: -70 centsYear’s Best Basis: -30 cents (July shipment)Difference: 40 cents increase in value Local Corn Ethanol Plant Bids:At Harvest Last Year: -42 centsYear’s Best Basis: -17 cents (July shipment)Difference: 25 cents increase in valueThese two examples illustrate that with basis management alone storing grain from harvest to summer had the potential to increase profits…last year it was more for beans than corn.Consideration #3 – Market CarryMarket Carry – When the price of each consecutive futures month is higher than the current month. In this example July soybean futures are higher than November, and July corn is higher than December. Current 2018 price difference between harvest and July as of Friday:Beans: 43 cents higherCorn: 25 cents higher Note, carry can only be collected if grain is already sold. If the grain wasn’t already sold, when I buy my futures position back in October at harvest as I sell my cash grain and roll my futures positions forward until July looking for higher prices it would cost me the values above, rather than collect them. Consideration 4: Interest on my operating noteFarmers will tell me they need to sell grain for cash flow reasons. What they are really telling me is that they have an operating note that they would like to pay down. Many banks are willing to work with farmers that will actually store hedged grain trying to collect storage and work the basis markets. Just because a loan is due doesn’t mean I can’t have a conversation with my banker about how both of us can profit together.However there is a cost to use the banks money and not pay the loan off. That is figured by looking at the interest rate on my operation note against the cash value of grain that I’m going to store. Then I multiply the cash value I could get for my grain today by the value of my operating notes interest rate.If I figured I can get a one year operating loan at 5.5% then my cost to store either crop is as follows.Beans: CASH corn values are at $8.22 per bushel x 5.5% = 45 cents per year or 3.8 cents per month to keep beans in storage.Corn: CASH corn values are at $3.45/bu x 5.5% = 19 cents/year or1.6 cents/month to keep corn in storage. Which crop is better to store?Following analyzes the profit potential of storing beans and corn from harvest in October until July (about 10 months) with what we know today on the market carry and using the basis potential from last year. BeansBasis Potential: 40 centsMarket Carry: 43 centsInterest Expense: -38 centsTotal Potential: 45 cents/bu CornBasis Potential: 25 centsMarket Carry: 25 centsInterest Expense: -16 centsTotal Potential: 34 cents per bushel The math today indicates there is an 11-cent opportunity advantage to store beans over corn. Still there are some additional considerations to think about. The trade warIf the trade war continues, it might be unlikely the basis potential above can be achieved. So, going into harvest this analysis would need to be done again with updated basis numbers to see if the current advantage can be maintained. I would want to look at current statements from officials in Washington on trade negations to see if we are close to an agreement or not. Carry fluctuations during harvestThat 25-cent corn carry is lower than last year. Historically corn carry usually increases during big crop years, so it’s reasonable the corn carry could still increase to 30 cents in two months, which would offset some of beans’ advantage over corn. There is also the possibility that with a large bean crop and a trade war that is not resolved that market carry for beans could increase another 5 cents as well. Moisture discountsMany farmers start harvesting corn at 17%+ and dry it down, but very few harvest wet beans. So, the cost to dry corn needs to be considered too. For those of us that only use air to dry the corn it can be more time consuming to dry the corn down and might mean that we will have to store corn over beans for logistical reasons. However this could still be a savings of more than 15 cents and would favor storing corn over beans.I’m not against filling the bins first with beans during harvest and then unloading the bins to complete the corn harvest later if the market so dictates. The cost to carry unpriced futuresThe above example assumes all futures are priced as of harvest. But, if any grain is unpriced, it could be more of an expense to store beans over the corn because the carry is larger for the beans. There is no indication of when prices will rally to a point that warrants making a futures sale. Based upon the markets of last year that could be late May before a sale is made. Income needsSometimes end of the year income is necessary to offset expenses. Since I can generate more money by moving the same amount of bean bushels as to corn, this can become a storage factor too. Basis fluctuations and unknownsUsually basis improves throughout the year and into summer for both crops. However, a North Dakota elevator manager told me bean basis moved 40 cents higher last year from harvest until summer, but corn basis only moved 10 cents. Location plays an important part of the decision process as well across many parts of the Corn Belt.Generally speaking when I’ve done this analysis in the past, corn has been the preferred crop over beans in many areas. But there is no perfect solution when you don’t have enough storage. All of the factors above should still be considered before making a decision. One must also realize a crops’ storage advantage can change over time. For instance, the China trade war is a big unknown factor right now that may change over the next few months. This might be the year it pays to store beans over corn. However I still lean towards corn because I like doing what usually works and not betting on the long shots.Because I don’t know what will happen exactly in the market, I like to suggest that all farmers have 100% storage capacity. Storage allows farmers to take advantage of all profit potential available to them, without having to worry about all of the shifting market factors affecting their bottom line. Plus the potential from the market as sited above on either crop it practically pays the yearly payments to build a new bin. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at [email protected]last_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Dan Armitage, host of Buckeye Sportsman, Ohio’s longest running outdoor radio showIn 2015 Ohio’s lawmakers passed a bill that prohibits dredged materials from Lake Erie harbors or any other navigation maintenance activities to be deposited into the lake after June, 30, 2020. Called “open lake dumping,” that’s been the acceptable disposal method for uncontaminated siltation and other dredgings. With a five-year compliance window about to close, that option is about to change.The impact of the new dredging regs will be greatest on the eight commercial ports along Ohio’s Lake Erie shorelines, where the US Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for the harbors that require regular dredging to maintain commercial traffic and recreational boaters and anglers enjoy the benefits. However, most of Ohio’s private and public small boat harbors and marinas along Lake Erie also require periodic dredging. As with the Corp’s commercial operations, those dredged materials have always been allowed to be put back in Lake Erie. But beginning 2020, those materials must be contained on an adjacent land site or trucked out to an upland containment area, increasing dramatically the dredging costs for marinas large and small.On the up-side, some of the commercial harbors are looking at the feasibility of a dredge-to-soil project, placing the material on an area that allows it to drain, after which it would be removed, blended and offered for sale as topsoil. Other options include the creation of a nearby “marsh land” which could become habitat for plants, animals and birds.So, if you witness lots of dredging activity in your favorite Lake Erie marina this season, and an increase in launch and dockages fees to follow, you’ll know why. Free boating training offeredSpeaking of boating, the United States Power Squadrons, now known as “America’s Boating Club,” has been promoting and educating safe boating for more than a century. The Columbus Sail and Power Squadron unit has a memorial educational fund established by one of its members to cover the costs of the upcoming class to earn the Ohio Boat Operators license, required of boaters born in 1982 or later who operate a boat with a motor of 10 hp or greater. Sign up is first come-first served at the web site for the 8-hour training program that will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 23 at the organization’s north Columbus facility. Students will learn everything needed to safely operate a power boat and will be tested on their knowledge at the end of the day to earn the Ohio Boat Operator License. Ohio Department of Natural Resources Watercraft officer will provide training for State of Ohio requirements, and topics include safety equipment, navigation rules and aids, finding your way, lines and knots for every-day boating, trailering, anchoring, communications afloat, lights and sound signals. For more information and to register for the free class, visit: cspsboater.orgFree frigid digit fishing instructionA free ice fishing clinic will be offered by the ODNR on Saturday, Feb. 16, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Hebron State Fish Hatchery, 10517 Canal Rd, in Hebron. Experts from the Ohio Division of Wildlife will discuss topics such as ice fishing planning and preparation, equipment use, and safety. Demonstrations and hands-on fishing opportunities in the field are planned, conditions permitting. Some equipment is available for use, but participants are encouraged to bring their own ice fishing gear. A fishing license will be required for participants 16 years of age and older and licenses must be obtained prior to the event. Participants are encouraged to dress appropriately for the weather as portions of this workshop will be held entirely outdoors.The workshop is free but pre-registration is required as space is limited. Call 614-644-3925 or email [email protected] to register. You must provide your customer I.D. number found on your fishing license when registering for this clinic. To read more about ice fishing in Ohio, visit wildohio.gov. Wecker named Chief of Wildlife DivisionODNR Director Mary Mertz has selected Kendra Wecker as Chief of the ODNR’s Division of Wildlife. Wecker has more than 25 years of experience working for the division building programs and partnerships that have helped shape Ohio’s conservation efforts. She becomes the first female Chief of the Division of Wildlife and began her assignment on Jan. 20.Wecker has advised numerous ODNR Division of Wildlife chiefs and other senior staff on legislative issues for all aspects of hunting, fishing, trapping and shooting sports. She has worked on many large projects affecting Ohioans, including commercial fishing regulations, Sunday hunting and improved shooting ranges.As chief of the division, Wecker will be responsible for day-to-day operations, including issues related to wildlife law enforcement, fish and wildlife research and management, promoting and establishing regulations related to wildlife recreation including hunting, fishing, trapping and wildlife watching, as well as the responsible management and investment of funds generated from the sale of hunting and fishing licenses and related equipment.Wecker was the wildlife diversity coordinator for almost 20 years before becoming the information and education executive administrator in 2016. In both roles she worked with outside organizations on outdoor public education programs, advised multiple chiefs on important topics, managed research project budgets totaling over $1 million, and coordinated legislative issues for the division. During her tenure she has been the recipient of multiple awards, including Wildlife Conservationist of the Year from the League of Ohio Sportsmen. According to the state agency, the Ohio State University graduate enjoys camping, fishing, and hunting with her family.Former Division of Wildlife Chief Mike Miller will stay within ODNR as acting law enforcement administrator for Parks and Watercraft. Miller served the ODNR Division of Wildlife for a year and a half, helping to bolster law enforcement capabilities and create the multi-year and lifetime licenses for hunting and fishing. New Wildlife Chief Names New AssistantsNew Division of Wildlife Chief Kendra Wecker recently announced the appointments of Pete Novotny and Todd Haines as assistant chiefs for the division. Together, Novotny and Haines bring more than 50 years of experience working for the division to their respective positions.Novotny began his career with the ODNR Division of Wildlife in 1996 as a wildlife officer, serving Harrison County. He continued working in the division’s law enforcement section until 2015, when he was promoted to manager of the division’s District Three office located in Akron where he led a staff of biologists, wildlife officers, public outreach and business personnel. Since April 2018, he has served as acting assistant chief and administrator of the division’s law enforcement section, overseeing all fisheries, wildlife, law enforcement and district operations. Novotny received a Bachelor of Arts degree in biology from Wittenberg University in Springfield. He resides in Cadiz with his wife and two sons.Haines began his career with the ODNR Division of Wildlife in 1987, working as a wildlife research technician in Oak Harbor. In 1993, he moved to southwest Ohio, working as a management supervisor in the division’s District Five office located in Xenia. Since 2003, Haines has served as the manager of the District Five office, leading local staff, building support with constituents, and supporting hunting and fishing opportunities for the public. Haines received a Bachelor of Science degree in wildlife management from West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia. He resides in Wilmington with his wife, and they have two sons.last_img read more

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first_imgGroundspeak Lackeys to Attend Mega-Events in Eight CountriesGroundspeak Lackeys are traveling thousands of miles from H.Q. this year to share smiles, shake hands and make geocaching memories at more than a dozen Mega-Events worldwide. We’d love to meet you and to hear your geocaching stories! Come find a Lackey at one of these Mega-Events:Illinois, USA – MOGA (Midwest Open Geocaching Adventure)Bussum, Netherlands – Geocaching Multi Event 2011Oeiras, Portugal – 11 Years! Oeiras – PortugalNew York, USA – ASP GeoBash 6Ontario, Canada – COG Spring FlingSalzburg, Austria – Pinzgau 2011Pennsylvania, USA – GeoWoodstock IXOhio, USA – Midwest GeobashWales, UK – Mega Wales 2011Wisconsin, USA – West Bend $1000 Cache Ba$hHQ in Washington State, USA – Groundspeak Block PartyNordrhein-Westfalen, Germany – Geocoinfest EuropaCatalunya, Spain – Mega Event CatalunyaSouth Carolina, USA – GeocoinfestWe hope to attend even more Mega-Events next year!Share with your Friends:More SharePrint Related11 Years! Oeiras – A Mega-Event Portuguese StyleMay 16, 2011In “Community”A Lackey’s “Thank You” after Attending a Mega-EventApril 1, 2011In “Community”7 Tips to Attending a Mega-EventOctober 26, 2011In “Community”last_img read more

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first_imgAs humble as Viswanathan Anand is, the five-time chess world champion believes aggression has played a big part in his success.In the Capital for a felicitation function organised by NIIT for young chess players, Anand said the insecurity of losing made him aggressive. “Aggression is a very useful tool. I don’t show it openly but the prospect of losing to some players is so horrifying you might want an extra bit,” Anand said.”Against (Veselin) Topalov (in the 2010 World Championship) I was able to channel that feeling into a willingness to play long games. I was able to feel motivated.”Another thing that got me going was thinking how happy Gary (Kasparov) would be to see me losing and then I thought how nice it would be to not give him that pleasure.”The 42-year-old from Chennai won his fifth world title, beating Boris Gelfand of Israel in Moscow in May. “The hunger is still there to go for the next one,” says Anand. “I am often asked how I maintain my motivation even after five world titles. Frankly, I never took to chess because it was on some kind of a check-list. I will keep playing till I enjoy it. The desire is still there,” he said.Anand’s ELO rating has fallen to 2780 and he is now No. 5 in the world. But he is not concerned.”It might take me seven to eight tournaments to take my rating to something close to the 2850 mark. But then I have played bad intentionally,” he joked.advertisementThe world champion is aware that he may face another tough challenge for his sixth title. He pointed out Magnus Carlsen of Norway and Armenia’s Levon Aronian were players to watch out for.”Both of them and others will be fighting for the right to play me at the next world championship. They are the biggest talents that have emerged in recent times and maybe a few decades. It would be challenging to play either of them and I know most people won’t consider me the favourite,” Anand said.On the national front, Anand feels Parimarjan Negi is progressing well.”Parimarjan prepares well, has a very sharp opening and often has creative ideas. He is actually doing very well in the open circuit but now will get into big tournaments and try to win the world cup,” he said.last_img read more

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