September 21, 2021
  • 10:13 am Canvas called poison pill for internet TV
  • 10:11 am UK manufacturing growth at ten-month low
  • 10:11 am Rogue trader prepares for prison term
  • 10:09 am Bill of the week
  • 10:09 am Alan Johnson in mea culpa

first_img Help by sharing this information RSF_en Joint letter to the Sultan of Oman on the right of press freedom and the targeting of journalists and human rights defenders News to go further Follow the news on Oman November 25, 2016 Find out more News April 22, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Website moderator gets 10-day suspended prison sentence OmanMiddle East – North Africa October 18, 2016 Find out more Receive email alerts Related documents Joint letter to Sultan of Oman by Reporters Without Borders and Arabic Network for Human Rights InformationPDF – 80.25 KB News A court in Muscat yesterday gave website moderator Ali Al Zwaidi a 10-day suspended prison sentence and a fine of 200 rials (400 euros) for posting an allegedly confidential government document online, but dismissed a charge of defamation that had been pending against him since August 2008.The confidential document was a council of minister directive to the information minister instructing him to restrict the public’s freedom to criticise government officials. It revealed that the TV programme “Hadha al-Sabah” was pre-recorded although it was portrayed as a live broadcast.Zwaidi had faced a possible three-year jail sentence on the defamation charge, which was the result of a complaint by the head of Omantel, Oman’s leading telecommunications company, about a critical comment posted on the website. The charge was dismissed after a nine-day investigation.————————-08.04 – “Don’t let your kingdom be one of those that censor free expression”Joint letter to Sultan of Oman by Reporters Without Borders and Arabic Network for Human Rights InformationJean-François Julliard, the secretary-general of Reporters Without Borders, and Gamal Eid, the executive director of the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information, have written to the Sultan of Oman, Qaboos Bin Said al Said, about journalist Ali al-Zwaidi, who faces a possible three-year prison sentenced for allowing a comment criticising the head of Oman’s main telecommunications company, Omantel, to be posted on an Internet forum he was moderating. He is due to appear in court on 21 April.“We urge you, Your Majesty, to halt this trial and to order Al-Zwaidi’s release on the grounds that his actions were limited to the defence of free expression and to the realm of publishing,” Julliard and Eid said in the letter. “We also urge you to call for the immediate abolition of all unnecessary restrictions on the lives and activities of the citizens of the Sultanate of Oman. Please do not let your Kingdom be included among those countries in the region that repress freedom of expression.”In August 2008, Al-Zwaidi permitted the posting of an article criticizing Muhammad Ben Ali al-Wehebi, the head of the telecommunications company Omantel. He was held for 11 days in February and was charged with violating article 61 of the Omani communications law, which prohibits “using a system or a device or a means of communication to direct a message while knowing it is untrue or which causes harm to a person or service.” At a court hearing on 17 March, he was surprised to learn that he was also charged with leaking plans by the council of ministers for a television programme called “Hadha al-Sabah”. Read the letter Organisation Appeal court lifts ban on daily, but confirms jail for two journalists Oman: Court postpones verdict of “Azamn” journalists, in a trial held below international standards, according to trial observation report December 27, 2016 Find out more OmanMiddle East – North Africa Newslast_img read more

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first_imgNews UpdatesHaryana Legal Services Authority Conducts E-Lok Adalat LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK25 Sep 2020 2:43 AMShare This – xToday, on 25.09.2020, Mr Justice Rajiv Sharma, Judge, Punjab and Haryana High Court-cum-Executive Chairman, HALSA inaugurated daily e-Lok Adalats in the state of Haryana. The daily e-Lok Adalats will be held in the State starting from today i.e. 25.09.2020 in order to help the litigants for amicable settlement of disputes. The concept of holding…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginToday, on 25.09.2020,  Mr Justice Rajiv Sharma, Judge, Punjab and Haryana High Court-cum-Executive Chairman, HALSA inaugurated daily e-Lok Adalats in the state of Haryana. The daily e-Lok Adalats will be held in the State starting from today i.e. 25.09.2020 in order to help the litigants for amicable settlement of disputes. The concept of holding daily e-Lok Adalat has been started by HALSA as initiative to provide one such solution to settle their grievances by use of Alternative Dispute Redressal mechanism. During his address Mr. Justice Rajiv Sharma, said that owing to success of the E-Lok Adalat and for regular benefit of the litigants, daily e-Lok Adalats will be started from today wherein cases will be taken up by the Courts in the state of Haryana on daily basis by use of Electronic Platform. His lordship further apprised that Haryana State Legal Services Authority has already successfully convened E-Lok Adalat on 18.09.2020 in which a total of 8538 cases were settled. The daily e-Lok Adalat is an another step forward to build on the foundation already laid. He highlighted the difficulties being faced by litigants and recognized the efforts put up by HALSA through DLSAs by extending all possible help either directly or through District Administration in Lockdown period be it release of prisoners, providing food, distribution of masks, hand sanitizers or timely help to the migrants besides other issues. His Lordship further envisaged the need for maximum use of technology to provide necessary relief and ensure amicable settlement of disputes in Courts and wished that this initiative will be a milestone is providing timely justice to the needy. Sh. Parmod Goyal, Member Secretary, HALSA stated that E-Daily Lok Adalat will provide much-needed relief to litigants owing to the restrictive working of Courts in view of COVID 19 Pandemic. The event was attended by all the Ld. District and Sessions Judges-cum-Chairpersons; Chief Judicial Magistrates-cum-Secretaries, Presiding Officers of benches of E-daily Lok Adalats, other Judicial Officers, Chairpersons of Permanent Lok Adalat (Public Utility Services), litigants, besides other Members of Legal fraternity in the State of Haryana. Next Storylast_img read more

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Saur Energy International:In the efforts to achieve greater energy security, the Government of Pakistan through its Alternative Energy Development Board (AEDB) has signed implementation agreements and guarantees direct agreements with 11 wind independent power producers (IPPs) for 560 MW of new wind energy capacity to serve the Pakistan grid.These projects would provide more than 1.8 billion units of clean energy annually. The projects were agreed with the help of the private sector and development finance institution (DFIs) including the International Finance Corporation (IFC), CDC, FMO, and ICD, amongst others.Six out of eleven wind projects are financed by the IFC, which on November 15, signed agreements to finance the so-called Super Six project portfolio with USD 450 million in debt. Those power plants, with a combined capacity of 310 MW, will be installed in the Jhimpir wind corridor in Sindh province and will be able to generate enough electricity to cover the annual needs of 450,000 homes while offsetting around 650,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions annually, IFC said in a separate statement. It will provide some USD 86 million in funds from its own account and USD 234 million mobilised from other lenders.The government agency, which is tasked with promoting renewables installation in Pakistan, has signed the agreements for 560 MW wind capacity to help with the country’s objective of having 30 percent renewables nationally by 2030 and cutting its dependence on fossil fuel imports.In September, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) had decided to shortly approve a loan worth USD 350 million for reforms and financial sustainability programmes that aim to address fiscal, governance, technical and policy deficits in the Pakistan energy sector. These deficits have adversely impacted the sector’s quality and efficiency of services, and the sustainability of energy infrastructure and finances, thereby challenging Pakistan’s fiscal balance and macroeconomic stability.More: Pakistan signs deal for 560 MW of new wind energy capacity Pakistan signs deals for 560MW of new wind powerlast_img read more

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first_imgFreddie Freeman says his “scariest night” while battling COVID-19 was when his fever spiked to 104.5 degrees.The @Braves star said a prayer that night: “Please don’t take me.” pic.twitter.com/xm9DWaEtyl— FOX Sports: Braves (@FOXSportsBraves) July 18, 2020MORE: Yankees TV broadcast forced into dark stadium because of pandemicThe crazy thing is is, Friday morning I woke up in a pool of sweat, [temperature gunned] my forehead and it said 98.2. So I had no fever that morning, and that was 7:30 in the morning. So I went — since I couldn’t go to the field, I had to wait for that test — I went and threw, I hit, I worked out and I ran at my house and felt completely fine. By 2 p.m., it hit me like a ton of bricks. …Friday night, that was the scariest night for me. I spiked to 104.5 fever. … I said a little prayer that night, because, you know, I’ve never been that hot before. My body was really, really hot. So I said ‘please don’t take me.’ I wasn’t ready. It got a little worrisome that night for me.Freeman said Saturday was his ninth consecutive day without symptoms. He said his wife and his aunt are both recovering after they tested positive for the disease.”I feel great,” he said. “I only lost one pound. … I didn’t lose any strength.” Freeman has received two negative tests for the coronavirus and has been cleared to play.”I feel like I’m a kid in a candy store again,” Freeman said. “You forget sometimes how much you love this game. I did truly miss it. I was so excited when I got to the yard.”Atlanta’s first home of the 2020 season is against the Rays on July 29. Freddie Freeman is happy to be healthy again after a scary experience with COVID-19.During a press conference Saturday, the Braves first baseman revealed that he had a temperature that spiked to 104.5 degrees while battling the coronavirus and thought he was in danger of losing his life.last_img read more

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first_imgShare on: WhatsApp “Our first goal was to qualify from the mini-league and the boys did that. Congratulations to them.”Cisse preferred not to dwell on the last Cameroon-Senegal clash — the 2002 final won 3-2 on penalties by the Indomitable Lions after 120 goalless minutes in Bamako.The Senegal coach captained his country that evening and failed to convert a penalty in the shootout.“I suspected that final would come up in the media,” said Cisse, “but 2002 is in the past.“Most of our squad in Gabon were quite young then. Even if they do remember the final, it would be a vague recollection.”Cameroon boasted stars in 2002 like Rigobert Song, now deceased Marc-Vivien Foe and Samuel Eto’o, while El Hadji Diouf was the best known Senegalese.Cameroon have no stars now, rather a team of emerging internationals led by France-based goal poacher Benjamin Moukandjo who are dedicated to working for each other.“We have young players hungry to play and keen to win,” said Belgian coach Hugo Broos. “Now that we have reached the quarter-finals, anything can happen.”Senegal do have current stars, most notably Liverpool attacker Sadio Mane. He has already scored twice in Gabon having finished third in the 2016 African Footballer of the Year poll.Cameroon and Senegal kick off at 2000 local time (1900 GMT), three hours after Burkina Faso and Tunisia launch the two-day quarter-finals schedule in Libreville.Burkina Faso held Cameroon and Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang-led Gabon before comfortably disposing of Guinea-Bissau to surprisingly top Group A.After wasting many scoring chances in a 2-0 defeat by Senegal, Tunisia beat Algeria 2-1 and Zimbabwe 4-2 to finish Group B runners-up under vastly experienced Polish coach Henryk Kasperczak.Leading Tunisia scorer Naim Sliti says his team play “beautiful football” and the four-goal 37-minute destruction of Zimbabwe was clinical finishing at its best.But physically imposing Burkina Faso, boasting experienced campaigners like Bakary Kone, Charles Kabore and Prejuce Nakoulma, are likely to prove stubborn opponents. Africa Cup of Nations quartersSaturdayBurkina Faso v Tunisia 7pm; Senegal v Cameroon 10pmLibreville, Gabon | AFP | Senegal coach Aliou Cisse insists Africa Cup of Nations opponents Cameroon are favourites to win the eagerly-awaited quarter-final in Franceville on Saturday.Pundits beg to differ, though, making the Senegalese Teranga Lions favourites not only to reach the semi-finals, but to go on and win the competition for the first time.Senegal impressed when winning Franceville-based Group B, defeating Tunisia and Zimbabwe by 2-0 scorelines before starting with 10 reserves in a 2-2 draw against Algeria.Cameroon came second in Libreville-based Group A, drawing 1-1 with Burkina Faso, edging Guinea-Bissau 2-1 and holding Gabon in a 0-0 stalemate, a result which eliminated the 2017 hosts.Cisse sounded like a Cameroon praise-singer as he spoke ahead of the last-eight showdown, the fourth meeting between the countries in the Cup of Nations with the Indomitable Lions holding a 2-1 advantage.“Cameroon are the favourites,” he stressed. “They have won the Cup of Nations four times while Senegal have never won it. So, if there has to be a favourite, it must be Cameroon.“The Indomitable Lions have great players and an experienced coach. I and my team are very honoured to meet them.”As to being tournament favourites, former national team star and captain Cisse was having none of that either.“How can we be favourites when you have the likes of Ghana, Morocco and the Democratic Republic of Congo still in contention?“Ghana were finalists in the last tournament, Morocco have impressed and DR Congo exhibit tremendous potential.“For me, reaching the quarter-finals was a huge relief as Senegal have not been to the knockout stage since 2006 in Egypt.last_img read more

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first_imgBy Emma Wulfhorst |Send your kids back to school this season ready to conquer the classroom and look good while doing it. We’ve compiled a list of the best of the best in trendy school essentials. From stationery and school supply storage, to technology accessories and lunchtime items, your student will be prepared for success.This article was first published in the August 10-17, 2017 Back to School edition of The Two River Times newspaper.last_img

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first_imgThe latest deciphered scroll contains references to the 364-day calendar used by the sect, as opposed to the lunar calendar used in Jewish religious practice today.It also refers to annual wine and olive harvest festivals no longer observed in Judaism.Shrine of the Book in Jerusalem, where Dead Sea Scrolls are exhibited. Photo by David Coppedge.Interestingly, a student of Bible dating assumed a 364-day calendar for Jews in pre-Christian times, and got many remarkable correlations of Old Testament dates that had been puzzling to chronologists. Although CEH cannot vouch for the conclusions, you can inspect Jim Liles’ 12-year research project at TheSacredCalendar.com.New Cave Has Possible New ManuscriptsIt’s remarkable that more caves may hold textual treasures in the wilderness of Israel so many years after the first Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered. Biblical archaeologist Randall Price and Oren Gutfeld believe that they have found a 12th cave used to store scrolls. Live Science reports that it looks empty on first glance, but the two are excavating the site because they found some artifacts present that suggest earlier use.In 2017, archaeologists announced the discovery of a 12th cave, though they said the cave had been looted in the mid-20th century. Inside the cave, they discovered only one blank scroll, along with the remains of jars, cloth and a leather strap that would have been used to wrap and store the scrolls, according to the team, led by Oren Gutfeld, an archaeologist with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Institute of Archaeology.Gutfeld and Randall Price, of Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, are now leading an archaeology team that is excavating this newfound cave.“Dr. Gutfeld and I have been at Qumran since December, working with our team on excavating a new cave in the Qumran area,” Price told Live Science in an email. No other details about this “new cave” have been released, but the team will release a statement soon, Price said.Archaeologists must be secretive because of the danger of looters. The articlesays this is an ongoing risk:In 2016, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced that it is carrying out a program to find and excavate any undiscovered caves in the Judaean Desert. In the past few years, there have been a number of instances in which looters have been caught carrying the remains of scrolls.Archaeologists with the Israel Antiquities Authority say it’s possible that more scrolls will be found in caves that are yet to be discovered.Randall Price is author of The Stones Cry Out, a layman’s guide to archaeological findings that corroborate the Bible. Price is careful to distinguish what archaeology can and cannot do. He has also participated in excavations on Mt. Ararat, but no certain remains of an ark have been yet found.Inside Cave One, where the Isaiah Scroll was found in a clay jar. Photo by David Coppedge.One of the most important implications of the Dead Sea Scrolls was to confirm the accuracy of the Masoretic Text, which dates to almost a thousand years later and was the only basis for translations of the Old Testament from the Hebrew (although the Greek Septuagint provided some corroboration). Most of these scrolls, including the great Isaiah Scroll found in Cave One, were inscribed before Christ. This means that the stunning passage about the ‘Suffering Servant’ in Isaiah 53, which could hardly refer to anyone than Jesus Christ, could not have been written after Christ as some kind of emendation of Isaiah after Christ suffered, died, and rose from the dead as described in the chapter. Indeed, the Isaiah Scroll, now housed in the Dead Sea Scrolls Museum in Jerusalem, indicates that Isaiah was a real eyewitness of the events during Hezekiah’s reign, some 700 years before Christ. Read that chapter here and ponder its significance in light of these amazing archaeological discoveries. Two separate articles discuss new findings about the famous Dead Sea Scrolls, the most significant archaeological find of the 20th century.Ancient Text Pieced TogetherMore than half a century after they were discovered, some 60 tiny fragments of text from a cave have been pieced together and deciphered. The Telegraph UK reports that researchers from Haifa University figured out they all belonged to a single scroll. Parts have been deciphered. What does it say? (Visited 810 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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first_img7 November 2008Ntshieng Mokgoro, winner of the Standard Bank Young Artist Award for Drama 2009, is a born storyteller.The 35-year-old mother of three has already made a profound mark on South Africa’s drama scene, having developed a number of community-based projects into professional productions staged on various national platforms.Mokgoro graduated from Alexandra Technical College in Johannesburg 1992 with a diploma in cosmetology, which she says she hated!“Luckily, I got a job as an assistant librarian, and part of my job description was to do storytelling for primary school kids,” she says. “I would ask the kids to dramatise the stories we read, and that’s where the passion for drama came from.”Mokgoro finds inspiration from observing the life of people in the township. “From seeing a dirty little girl playing on the pavement in the township, to an old woman selling vegetables and chicken intestines at the side of a road, to a teenage girl who is screaming for help in the middle of the night. Township life, rural life.”She loves writing about myths of women, birth, arranged marriages, and the death of women.When asked about the actors she would like to work with, she says she is particularly impressed with Reshoketswe Sebotsane, who played in the television series Death of a Queen. “I’m impressed by women who have presence, grace and power on stage, and who really know what they are doing.”Mokgoro’s production Umdlwembe, which she wrote and directed for the Barney Simon Young Directors Festival, was awarded a professional season at Johannesburg’s Market Theatre in December 1999, and was funded by Standard Bank to go to the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown in 2000.In 2000, Moroko’s play Eyes of Truth was directed by Sello Maake Ka Ncube for the Barney Simon Young Writers Festival.Ntshieng has also tried her hand successfully at scriptwriting for television and film. In 2001 she was a script contributor for Gazlam 1, a drama for SABC 1 that explored the theme of HIV/Aids through the experience of two young people. The series also looked at the hard reality of young people growing up in Yeoville and trying to make it in the music business.In 2004, she was a trainee director for the controversial movie about the Rwandan genocide, Hotel Rwanda.In 2005, she wrote and directed a residence project at the Market Theatre Laboratory which was nominated for a Naledi Award in 2006.In 2007 she wrote and directed Thursday’s Child, which won an award at the Market Theatre’s Zwakala Festival and was performed at the Youth Festival in Vienna.Mokgoro is currently director of the Publik Kreativity Drama Krew, based in Johannesburg’s Alexandra township, where she lives with her husband Mothusi and her three sons Karabo, Boitumelo and Bogosi.“I’m looking forward to using this opportunity to promote myself and my work to be recognised as one of the few female black directors in South Africa,” says Mokgoro.“It is also an opportunity to learn and to gather all the knowledge and skills that, in future, I will impart to female directors who are also struggling to make a mark, or have their voice heard, in the industry.”The annual Standard bank Young Artist Awards were started in 1981 by the National Arts Festival, Grahamstown, with Standard Bank coming on board as a sponsor in 1984.The awards, seen as one of the most prestigious of their kind in the country, honour young South African artists who have not yet gained widespread national exposure or acclaim, but who are making a significant mark in their field.The awards recognize and actively promote the talent of these young artists, providing them with financial support and a platform for experimentation. Winners receive a cash prize and financial support for their participation on the main programme of the National Arts Festival, Grahamstown.Source: National Arts Festival, Grahamstownlast_img read more

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first_imgYesterday I published my 4,000th post here at www.thesalesblog.com. Not all of them are written posts. Around 200 of them are YouTube videos we pulled in when I was experimenting with daily video, and another 130 or so are In the Arena podcast episodes. The oldest post goes back to January 2008, long before I understood the medium, and long before I found my voice as a writer.Here is what I have learned:You don’t really know what you know until you decide to start teaching others. The fact that you are sharing something requires you to deepen your learning.Over the course of a decade, you will change your mind. I have often had people point out when I confess that I was wrong about something I have written or published. If you are not changing your mind, you are not growing.If you focus on some topic long enough, you start to find better ways to convey the idea in a way that makes it more helpful to others. Your clarity improves.My carpal tunnel starts at the tip of the middle finger of my right hand and ends at the back of my shoulder. I now wish my teacher hadn’t kicked me out of typing class in 9th grade (I was continually looking at the keys, something I still do). I should have tried a lot harder. I type with two fingers and one thumb for the space bar.I do my best work early in the morning. I spoke to dozens of writers, almost all of whom shared with me that they rise very early to write. That data point convinced me to set my alarm for 5:00 AM instead of 6:30 AM, providing me with a full 90 minutes to write. When I began, a 500-word post took more than an hour. Now it takes less than fifteen minutes.The idea you believe to be less valuable than others is the exact thing someone needs now. The idea you slave over doesn’t get the attention you believe it deserves. The perception of value is in the mind of the person who consumes the idea.If you do anything long enough and with an iron discipline, you will improve. I was a terrible writer when I started and something worse than terrible as an editor. I am marginally better, and with continued effort, I should be good in another ten years.You are an antenna. Ideas come through you if you open yourself up to recognizing them. Cataloging the ideas and banking them for the future is a valuable exercise, even if you don’t publish them.You cannot occupy the space of creator and a critic at the same time. It’s better to separate these two roles, creating without judgment first, and judgment without fear later.We underestimate the incremental. You can stack up results a little at a time, only to look back and realize how much you have accomplished.I have acquired many friends, and some of my closest, friends through the blog, Including Seth Godin, who provided the model and inspired me to write daily, and someone I call my mentor.Most of all, I learned that I am a writer. It isn’t something I do; it’s something I am. When I am not writing, I wish I was writing. If you do consistently long enough, it can become your identity.last_img read more

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first_imgThousands of students from across Jamaica gathered at the Trelawny Multi-Purpose Stadium on Friday February 22 to celebrate Jamaica Day 2013, in a colourful display of dance, music, speech and song. It was the first national gathering to mark the day intended to foster a spirit of patriotism. The festivities, held under the theme ‘Celebrate Jamaica: We On It’, saw students perform numerous items in a gala event. Performances included a parade of the uniformed groups and schools celebrating their 50th anniversary, praise and worship, parade of the national symbols, dance, poetry, song, and drumming. Conceptualized as a cultural extravaganza, Jamaica Day 2013 saw the Ministry of Education’s six regions compete for the best exhibition in the following categories: Best interpretation of the Jamaica Day Theme; Best Booth; Greatest Student participation; Research and Advocacy; and Most Sustainable Project.There was robust competition among the six regions in the exhibition section, at the end of which Region One and Region Four tied for the top spot. Region Four presented traditional herbal remedies and demonstrated an innovative way to combine the rearing of fish with the farming of vegetables. Region Three mounted a display on persons from the region who have excelled and used the motif of a ship to focus on Jamaica’s movement towards the goals of Vision 2030.Modern technology was the focus of Region One’s exhibit. Outstanding among this group of exhibitors were the Robotics Team from Jamaica College, which presented the group’s new robot, and Allman Town Primary, which demonstrated how the school operates its own radio station. Denham Town Primary used discarded paper to make fuel for cooking, while Windward Road showed how the school is using an electronic white board and other devices to enhance teaching and learning.Region Five highlighted literacy in the region and among other items, created a quilt displaying the names of the schools in the region and their logos. Indigenous material was the theme of Region Six’s exhibit, which put the national fruit, ackee, at the forefront, as well as innovative spreads and artwork. Region two left before the exhibit could be judged.Children from various institutions across Jamaica were excited as they watched and listened to the various performances and visited the booths. Describing the day’s happenings, seven year-old Alicia Barrett of Brampton Primary, Trelawny effused, “It’s so amazing. I liked the dancing and when they marched with the flags.Miss Sheron Robinson, acting Principal of Williamsfield All Age school Westmoreland, gave a positive assessment of the event. ”It’s a good experience for the children. Many schools don’t know how to put the event together,” she said, noting that school administrators could learn how to structure the celebrations by patterning the national event.Speaking on the relevance of Jamaica Day, Miss. Robinson noted, “Patriotism is dying and people don’t see the country as somewhere to love and don’t put an effort into developing it. So an event such as this is good.”Javin Jackson, grade six student and peer counsellor at Wakefield Primary, in Trelawny, told JIS News that celebrating Jamaica Day is important, especially for students because it allows them to know more about Jamaica in a different kind of atmosphere.Jamaica Day in Schools is one of flagship projects of the Culture in Education Programme.last_img read more

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