June 24, 2021
  • 5:29 am Gatland praises battle-hardened Wales
  • 5:29 am Connacht’s Keith Matthews to win 100th cap
  • 5:26 am Stuart Lancaster: An honest man who failed on the biggest stage
  • 5:26 am A week in the life of a Sale Sharks academy player, Part Three
  • 5:25 am Round Two: Six Nations Team of the Week

first_imgLast week, The Hollywood Reporter published an interview with David Crosby, which focused on politics in the United States, Donald J. Trump, the score he wrote for the new independent film Little Pink House, and more. Crosby was predictably outspoken on politics, reaffirming his stance that he doesn’t want supporters of Donald Trump and voicing his endorsement for Elizabeth Warren for president in the future.However, one standout moment came when asked about a potential Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young reunion. When asked whether Donald Trump’s election could cause a reunion, Crosby responded:Yes, it might, but we don’t get along, and we haven’t gotten along for a while. They’re all mad at me. But they all dislike Donald Trump very much, the same way I do. We dislike him intensely because he’s a spoiled child who can’t do his job. So a reunion is possible. We don’t like each other, but we like Trump a whole lot less.Hilariously, The Hollywood Reporter followed up with “Would a reuniting of the band include Neil Young?”, to which Crosby sassily responded, “Well, that’s the only way you could reunite the band, isn’t it?”You can read the full interview for yourself on The Hollywood Reporter here.[Photo: Bryan Lasky]last_img read more

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first_imgAfter a series of questions to encourage internal dialogue about our own professional essence and its connection with tourism, in this column I talk about why it is difficult for us to make career change decisions, who influences them and who has the last word in that story.It is worth repeating once again that in the process of seeking our professional definition, we should not rely much on the state, employers or education. Not because of criticism that would be an end in itself, but because no one cares enough about how satisfied, motivated, and engaged we are. Or it should be. Financially, for the “care” of young people and the promotion of the (tourism) profession on an annual basis is allocated 52 times less compared to some other tourism “worries” or let’s call them; priorities. More on that soon.Now, if we can’t really find support in revealing our own professional identity in the state, employers and education, the question is how can we help ourselves? And what decisions do we need to make? And is there any proven recipe here? Instructions? Equations? Well, if there was a universal solution, only satisfied people with large MERAKI capital would walk this planet. Let’s remember, MERAKI is passion, part of your own essence that you put into what you do. And to our great joy, in Croatian tourism we have giants with such capital. Employees, managers, employers, consultants, professors, civil servants, scientists and journalists who make tourism a better system. More about them soon.The focus here is on those who have “strayed” into tourism. Who do not like tourism. Who don’t like their job. No organization. No guests. Who are tired of tourism. Who no longer want to have anything to do with tourism. And those who want to stay in tourism, but not in the same way. The focus is on the processes going on in your heads. And on the awareness that it is action is the key to any success (Pablo Picasso), and thus in finding his own professional definition.As a scientist, I often hear that theories are useless, but the truth is the water is deep. Although I am a proponent of practical demonstration, I must emphasize that theories teach and guide us. Their value is that many before us have tested them in different variants and confirmed their correctness, but making decisions based on these findings (evidence based management) has yet to be introduced into our business practice. Let’s demonstrate this with the example of our marketing and sales director who understands that tourism consumes him and yet it is not his ultimate passion. Career development theories say that he should be able to respond to the needs of different jobs and adapt to the requirements of the employer [1], that balance, authenticity and challenges are his most important motivators and that he will make a career change decision differently from the colleague he works with [ 2], and that he will feel best when his new job allows him to be what his identity really is [3].Conclusion 1. The scientific knowledge and experiences of others can give us direction, but they do not give all the answers.Although we live in a time when it is generally concluded that “young people have high expectations”, that “no one is looking for a permanent job anymore”, it is important to know that neither domestic nor foreign research confirms these theses. These scientific studies actually demystify the “stability of work” in the context of globalization and technological development, concluding that today, as 30 years ago, it is still important for people to have a stable job and that no significant changes in “work” behavior have occurred [4]. It has been noticed that men stay a little shorter in a certain job, but the feeling of security that a certain job / career brings is still important. This is supported by a recent survey [5] conducted in three different time periods on a sample of 465 employees, according to which 66% of respondents hope for a secure and stable career with one employer.In most European countries, people work for the same employer for an average of 10 years, and the Croatian CES estimates that young people entering the labor market will change jobs on average 4 times [6], which is three times less than the average American.Our colleague confirms these estimates but also points to something even more important; the traditional values ​​that guide our society are also reflected in “work behavior”. And that social framework, whether we like it or not, gives shape to our personal value system. Because it is clear that we were born in India, Tibet or China so that our order of values ​​would be different from the one from which all our reactions, decisions and actions are currently based !?Conclusion 2. Job security is a (intergenerational) dominant value. Be aware of all the values (family, money, religion, freedom, adventure, social status, etc.) do you define what you do or would like to do?When this young director is given the opportunity to change jobs, the decision will be influenced by his assessment of the extent to which his skills, interests and values ​​are in line with the requirements of the new job / career [7]. So, excellent analytical and sales skills + travel preferences (interest) + balance, financial freedom and adventurism (values) are the foundations on which our colleague will look for new jobs and make decisions about them, without even being aware of it!We now also have proof that our decisions are greatly influenced by those closest to us; parents, siblings, friends and partners [8]. Therefore, in the process of changing jobs, it would be worthwhile for our Millennial to become aware of who and what kind of influence he may have on his decisions. Let us not forget that everyone has their own value system and from that position they decide and act. It is important to emphasize that in special discussions they will meet with the opposite sex because they arise from different understandings of work / career and different ways of making decisions between men and women [9]. While both he and his partner will have important challenges in the early stages of their careers, over time women tie their decisions to family balance and often only in the later stages of their careers do they commit to revealing their professional identity [10].Conclusion 3. The way you evaluate your skills, strengths and potentials can be a limiting factor in finding professional passion. As well as the beliefs of loved ones. Revise your estimates with the support of experts! If you hear from our colleague that he “accidentally got a job there”, “that tourism simply found him”, etc., now we know that the so-called “Planned coincidence” [11] which, according to scientists, relies heavily on intuition (or luck). This is a very important realization for anyone who wants to understand their professional essence because even though we are not aware of it, we often base our career / job decisions on some previous activities and events [12]. Two events were crucial to this young man; the fact that from season to season, as a kid, he sold shells to tourists on the waterfront that he would emerge himself, where he spontaneously fell in love with tourism and when he worked one season in his father’s haberdashery factory, realizing what he didn’t want to do.Conclusion 4. Everything you have done so far can serve in understanding your potentials. Be aware of who, when and how influenced your professional direction. Revise the way you look at your work experiences so far!Given his many years of experience in the hotel industry, it would be interesting to follow the ways in which this young director made his career decisions because they involved changes in employers and cities. Were these decisions based on the rational-conscious level or did he give preference to the unconscious aspect that would manifest as instinct or the unconscious automatic process (known in the literature as Good instinct or System 1)? Scientists point out that it is this instinct that makes premature decisions and when our conscious part processes information, it actually selects only those data that support the choice of instinct [13]. The question is also whether he carefully analyzed everything, identified all possible options, compared them, and anticipated all possible factors and focused on the best possible choice (as Maximizer) or its criteria and the threshold of acceptability of a particular job are significantly lower and more flexible (kao satisfactory). If he talked to loved ones who have the characteristics of a character / style opposite to him, they certainly found themselves in a heated discussion because while one emphasized that everything should be planned and planned in advance, the other argued that it is important to have some direction and that just arrange everything. Research indicates that those who have thought and analyzed the best option with a lot of thought ultimately have “better” jobs but feel worse about them, ie they are less satisfied compared to those who made those decisions faster and based on fewer criteria [14 ].Conclusion 5. When deciding on a change of job / career, we cannot completely rely on intuition or ratio. Combine both decision-making styles. Although we live in a country where we do not have much choice in terms of work, to offer our colleague more than 7 jobs / options, it would lead him to a kind of “paralysis” and dissatisfaction because research has shown that even after the decision regretted those other rejected choices This choice paradox explains our anxiety and guilt about too many choices and empirically confirms that the profits of firms that narrowed their choice of offer increased significantly [15]. Wouldn’t it be nice for our colleague to experience the paradox of choice in search of his or her better professional version? And after going through the first phase – realizing that he is not happy / satisfied and not ready to accept that he needs change, and the second phase – awareness of the causes of dissatisfaction and thinking about the possibilities of change [16], that in this third phase – experimenting with their own opportunities and exploring a different range of ideas, this young man really has a choice!He realized he was unhappy because his balance was upset, however questions what to do do i stay in tourism? what if i regret how will I know I made a good decision? make up his daily routine. Let’s remember that he is a great connoisseur and lover of music, so maybe ideas / decisions go in that direction. Or values, beliefs, fears, past events, the influences of loved ones still judgment for staying in tourism. Because after all, it is a concrete job.When he is sure of a new option / idea, the phase of creating a plan follows, and after the plan grows into action, a phase of stabilization is expected, ie consolidation with all aspects of the new job / career. Whether it has to do with tourism or not. Does it include music. Or it is a combination of both. Or something completely new.Conclusion 6. Define what change means to you (complete change of career, project, starting your own business, etc.)? Be aware of what your biggest fears are? And face in your head the worst-case scenarios that can happen if you dare to do what you really want?After so much research, different human experiences, even predictions of game theories, the conclusion is that neither study, nor story, nor impulse, nor numbers can tell us what is best for us. They can help us and they can guide us, but the answer must come from ourselves. And we also have experts (psychologists, coaches) and various methods and tools (manuals, online courses, testing, etc.) that can be useful on this path of cognition and action. Some studies indicate that it takes an average of two years to make a decision to change jobs / careers [17]. Therefore, give yourself time.Once you realize your professional definition, only growth follows! Allow yourself to be or not be tied to tourism. Embrace that responsibility and become aware of your own value systems, the way you experience your skills and potentials, your work experiences so far, the ways you have made decisions so far, and the layers of fears you have. And boldly press restart!Published by: Dr. sc. Marinela Dropulić -RužićLiterature [1] Hall, DT (1996). Protean careers of the 21st century. The academy of executive management, 10 [2] Mainiero, LA, & Sullivan, SE (2005). Kaleidoscope careers: An alternate explanation for the “opt-out” revolution. The Academy of Management Executive, 19 [3] Super, DE (1990). A life-span, life-space approach to career development. In: D. Brown, L. Brooks and Associates (eds.), Carrer Chioce and Development, 2nd ed. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 197-261.[4] Rodrigues, RA, & Guest, D. (2010). Have careers become boundaryless ?. Human Relations, 63 [5] Wittekind, A., Raeder, S., & Grote, G. (2010). A longitudinal study of determinants of perceived employability. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 31 [6] Maslić Seršić, D., & Tomas, J. (2015). Employability as a modern alternative to job security: theories, findings and recommendations in the field of work psychology. Journal of Social Policy, 22 [7] Amundson, NE, Borgen, WA, Iaquinta, M., Butterfield, LD, & Koert, E. (2010). Career decisions from the decider’s perspective. The Career Development Quarterly, 58 [8] Schultheiss, DEP, Palma, TV, Predragovich, KS, & Glasscock, JMJ (2002). Relational influences on career paths: Siblings in context. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 49(3), 302.[9] Brosseau, DC, Domains, JF, & Dutka, TW (2010). The importance of partner involvement in determining career decision-making difficulties. A Multi-Sectoral Approach to Career Development: A Decade of Canadian Research A multi-sector approach to professional development: A decade of research in Canada, 32, 307.[10] Mainiero, LA, & Sullivan, SE (2005). Kaleidoscope careers: An alternate explanation for the “opt-out” revolution. The Academy of Management Executive, 19 [11] Mitchell, KE, Levin, S., & Krumboltz, JD (1999). Planned happenstance: Constructing unexpected career opportunities. Journal of counseling & Development, 77 [12] Murtagh, N., Lopes, PN, & Lyons, E. (2011). Decision making in voluntary career change: An other ‐ than ‐ rational perspective. The Career Development Quarterly, 59 [13] Brownstein, AL (2003). Biased predecision processing. Psychological bulletin, 129(4), 545.[14] Iyengar, SS, Wells, RE, & Schwartz, B. (2006). Doing better but feeling worse: Looking for the “best” job undermines satisfaction. Psychological Science, 17 [15] Barry Shwatz; The paradox of choice. Available at: https://www.ted.com/talks/barry_schwartz_on_the_paradox_of_choice/transcript.[16] Bimrose, J., & Barnes, SA (2007). Styles of career decision-making. Australian journal of career development, 16 [17] Murtagh, N., Lopes, PN, & Lyons, E. (2011). Decision making in voluntary career change: An other ‐ than ‐ rational perspective. The Career Development Quarterly, 59last_img read more

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first_img103/24 Norman Cres, Norman Park is a spacious apartment.McMahon, who currently plays for the Melbourne Rebels in Super Rugby has been linked to a Japanese club for some time.“I’m selling as I’m obviously heading overseas for a while and not sure when I’ll be returning,” McMahon said.“I’m also looking at going down a different path at the moment in regards to where I’m putting my money into.”McMahon said he did not have an exact date on his move to Japan just yet. Sean McMahon of the Wallabies has made the decision to sell his Norman Park unit. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)Wallabies back-rower Sean McMahon is ready to offload his investment property at Norman Park.With plans to move to Japan early next year, McMahon has listed the two-bedroom property at 103/24 Norman Cres for sale. The 23-year-old, who has played 17 Tests for the Wallabies since debuting in 2014, said he first invested in the boutique unit by Mosaic off the plan more than 18 months ago and it was finished earlier this year. Inside 103/24 Norman Cres, Norman Park.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor1 hour agocenter_img 103/24 Norman Cres, Norman Park.Ray White New Farm agent Meaghan Bakker said the Norman Park apartment offered a huge courtyard and luxury finishes.“Reside by Mosaic is a boutique apartment complex in a quiet enclave of Norman Park. It’s for sale by negotiation but comes with everything you could want,” she said.“It’s got two bedrooms, two bathrooms, one car plus a really tranquil indoor and outdoor space.“There’s fully ducted air conditioning plus European appliances and energy saving hot water systems.”last_img read more

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first_imgMartin Flores and Angel Cabrera lead the way after two rounds of the Wells Fargo Championship in Charlotte but it was an unassuming Zimbabwean who made the headlines with a record-equalling round. De Jonge’s Friday charge has spared him from the cut and the 33-year-old is now looking forward to the rest of the weekend. “I wish I could go into every round with that kind of a mind set, but it’s easier said than done,” De Jonge, who made eight birdies and an eagle, said on pgatour.com . “As horrible as yesterday was, today was as nice. So this game gives you something and takes something away.” The story could have been even more remarkable for De Jonge when he gave himself an 18-foot putt on the last hole for a course-record 61, but it was not to be. “I knew I had to keep going really just to make the cut, so I had that mind set all day that I needed to get out and get as far under par as possible and thank goodness it worked out,” De Jonge added. “To be honest, I didn’t expect to be playing this weekend, so everything is a bonus. I have to do a good job of starting fresh tomorrow and realizing that it’s a new round.” McIlroy’s hopes of repeating his 2010 win receded after a nightmare round of 76 on Friday. After starting out three strokes off the lead, the Northern Irishman suffered a back-to-back double bogeys at holes three and four, while further losses at two, six and 16 were only partially offset by three birdies to leave him at one over and spared the cut by a single stroke. The Charlotte event has been more consistent for Argentinian veteran Cabrera, who led by one shot after a first-round 66 and followed up with a 69 on Friday to ensure he kept his place at the top of the leaderboard. Flores joined Cabrera at the top of the pile after adding a 68 to his opening 67, while England’s Justin Rose is also well in the mix, his second-round 67 keeping him just a stroke off the leaders at eight under. Scotland’s Martin Laird is on five under, but England’s Lee Westwood will play no further part in the weekend after he missed the cut at three over, having added a 76 to his opening 71. Brendon de Jonge began the day dead last on the leaderboard after shooting 80 on Thursday but turned his form around in dramatic fashion 24 hours later, a 10-under-par 62 vaulting him up the standings and back to two under overall – seven shots off the joint leaders. De Jonge’s efforts saw him tie the Quail Hollow course record held by Rory McIlroy, whose final-round 62 saw him to his first career PGA victory in this tournament in 2010. Press Associationlast_img read more

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