June 24, 2021
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first_img Posted: March 6, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, March 6, 2019 Former Sweetwater Union HS District employee accused of embezzling more than $50,000 KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsCHULA VISTA (KUSI) – A former employee of the Sweetwater Union High School District was arrested on suspicion of embezzling more than $50,000 in money orders from the district, police reported today.Danya Margarita Williams, 42 of Chula Vista, was taken into custody Tuesday and booked into the Las Colina Detention Facility on suspicion of stealing the money while she was employed by the district, Chula Vista police Capt. Phil Collum said.District officials discovered the alleged embezzlement in late 2017 and reported it to Chula Vista police, Collum said.Detectives worked with district officials and determined that Williams had allegedly appropriated more than $50,000 in money orders between June 2016 and November 2017, he said.As part of her job, Williams was responsible for processing money orders received for fingerprint background investigations at the district, which are required during employment screening, according to police.Each background investigation costs between $52 to $75 per applicant and the applicants pay the fee using money orders, Collum said.“Instead of processing the money in accordance with district requirements, Williams deposited the money into her personal bank account,” Collum alleged.The exact amount of money that Williams allegedly embezzled was not revealed, nor was it immediately clear if she posted bail. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR House leaders are expected to introduce a $1.3 trillion omnibus spending bill today, just days ahead of the federal government’s Friday funding deadline, after negotiations over a number of spending and policy issues could not be completed Monday. With little time left to clear the fiscal 2018 spending package through both chambers, lawmakers may be forced to move a two- to three-day continuing resolution to keep the government open, reported CQ. Following a GOP Conference meeting Monday evening, House Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-N.J.) said he didn’t believe Congress would need another stopgap to extend current funding past Friday’s deadline.last_img

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first_imgTwo incidents in the recent past have brought back the spectre of extra-judicial killings. The first incident refers to the alleged encounter killing of a Delhi-based businessman by officers of the Delhi Police Special Cell. The second incident refers to an earlier encounter killing of 20 red sandalwood smugglers near Tirupati in Andhra Pradesh by officers from the Andhra Police. Since both incidents are currently under judicial scrutiny, it would be unwise to arrive at judgements surrounding their culpability. However, rising evidence against the versions presented by both sets of police forces has left numerous observers, from both the political class to civil society, rather disturbed.  Also Read – Working on improving tiesIn the first case, reports have emerged that 10 days before the Delhi-based businessman was gunned down in an alleged encounter, the Delhi Police Special Cell had told a local court that neither an FIR nor a complaint was received against him. This discovery flies in the face of the Special Cell’s claim that the slain businessman was wanted in several cases and had been on the run from the law. With reference to the encounter killing of 20 red sandalwood smugglers, news reports have emerged that the many of the slain were possibly tortured before being murdered. According to the police, these 20 labourers had attacked them with sickles, axes and stones and the police had gunned them down in self-defence. This claim is perplexing on many levels.  Also Read – Political parties and our RepublicThe police was not involved in a skirmish with highly trained and heavily armed militants; they were dealing with a group of underpaid minimum wage labourers. If it was indeed in self-defence as they claim, where are the injuries of the task force members? Reportedly, only two members of the task-force were injured. Further disheartening is the inefficacy of our legal system in resolving encounter killings. According to government figures, out of 555 recorded encounter killings between 2009 and 2013, only 144 cases were been resolved. Irrespective of a final judgement on both incidents,  one cannot rationalise extra-judicial killings, without going down a very slippery moral slope. Once the State and its police go down the path of extra-judicial killings, it is likely to make its way towards tyranny.   It is impossible to condone summary executions, especially if they are conducted by those who consider themselves to be the guardians of the law. Instead of summary executions, the State, especially its police, must follow the due process of law and subject the suspect to a trial process. Even Ajmal Kasab, one the perpetrators behind the heinous terror attack in Mumbai, was subjected to a trial process. According to respected political commentator Praful Bidwai, “Civil liberties are too valuable to be subordinated to reasons of state without undermining democracy”. The truth behind both these murky incidents, therefore, must come through soon.last_img read more

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first_imgDeepshikha Singh, wife of an army officer currently posted in Shillong, has recently won Mrs India Galaxy 2017, India’s most prestigious pageant for married women, organized by Vibrant Concepts. She has also bagged the title for most beautiful eyes. The event was a grand affair and was attended by the most eminent personalities of the fashion world. The jury included popular punjabi singer Shankar Sahney and Supermodel Universe 2016 Gagan Verma.Deepshikha Singh who is teaching in Army Public School, Shillong, informed that the contest began on September 16, flagging the theme “Stop Violence Against Women” at Tivoli Garden Resorts, Chhatarpur. The contestants stayed at the resort for 4 days and underwent several grooming sessions on health and lifestyle under the guidance and mentorship of Ginny Kapoor and Gagandeep Kapoor, directors of Vibrant Concepts. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe contest included various rounds including talent round, presentation/act on Stop Violence Against Women and many more. Thereafter, the contestants were given the opportunity to have a portfolio shoot wherein they were provided with professional make up and styling tips and were also taught to pose like models, by professional photographers.The auditions were held across the country and around 4000 women were screened by the members of an expert panel. Towards the end, only 40 women were selected as finalists. The contestants were given various challenges and online tasks and were being assessed throughout on that basis.Deepshikha Singh, who is elated by her great success, is now looking forward to represent India at the International level.last_img read more

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first_img Listen Now 3 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. How Success Happens Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. The recent buzz of celebrity nude scandals serves as a stark reminder for everyone who relies on cloud storage for their personal data. While we’re not all high-profile targets, we can still fall victim to hackers who gain access to our accounts by guessing our passwords, security question, and user names. This essentially created the perfect storm for the celebrity accounts that were hijacked at the beginning of September. When hackers obtain one set of login credentials, they can easily attack multiple accounts that a user owns, especially if you use the same passwords across services.Related: 10 Data-Security Measures You Can’t Do WithoutHere are four ways to proactive in the face of cloud security risks.1. Periodically refresh passwords and security questions. Phishing is the practice of misleading users so that they unintentionally provide personal information to hackers. This tactic played a pivotal role in the recent photo leak. Phishing can happen with fake login pages, spammy email links, duplicitous online surveys, and even over the phone.Cyber criminals can use personal details, such as your favorite color, the last four digits of your credit card and your email addresses, to make educated guesses about your sign-in credentials. They might contact a service provider posing as a user, provide identifying details and gain even greater access to accounts. This is why it is so important to prevent your security credentials from becoming stagnant. Rotate your password every few months and consider using new security questions and answers, too.Related: Best Practices for Employees to Protect the Company From Hackers2. Enable two-step authentication. Many online account services, such as Apple’s iCloud and Google Drive, provide users with an optional two-step authentication system that prevents hackers from getting into your data even if they’ve discovered your password.Two-step authentication asks users for a second, additional pin code to sign in and use an account on a new device. If someone is unable to provide this second piece of information, then they cannot gain access to the account and its data.Unfortunately, many people are unaware of two-step authentication or they find it inconvenient. These accounts are less secure. According to Apple, the celebrity accounts that were recently hacked did not have two-step authentication enabled. The next time you’re updating your security settings, make sure to opt into the two-step verification process.  3. Store sensitive data offline. A small flash drive stored in a safe deposit box is much safer from prying eyes than data stored in a cloud account.  If you are truly worried about storing sensitive data on cloud accounts, then consider using offline storage, such as external hard drives, to protect your information.Ultimately, you need to make a decision regarding the value and sensitivity of your personal data. When you upload information to a cloud service, you are handing the responsibility for protecting it to a third party company (just like you entrust a bank to protect your flash drive in the safety deposit box.) When users place their trust in a third party, they must carefully examine the security systems in place and consider the consequences if these third-party services are breached.These high-profile stories about cloud storage breaches should concern everyone. They demonstrate how vulnerable our data can be when they are stored online. A combination of safe credential practices and data storage alternatives can help you protect sensitive data from malicious parties.Related: Dark ‘Cloud’ Forming: The Struggle to Balance Security and Employee Privacy September 17, 2014last_img read more

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first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. June 14, 2018 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office recently granted Amazon two patents directed to remote control of human hands. The Amazon patents are able to obtain and record users’ location and the detailed movements of their hands. Therefore, highly private information such as when an employee takes a bathroom break or pauses to scratch may be obtained and recorded by the patented system. That, in turn has led to concerns that the patents could violate protected privacy rights of employees under the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The Fourth Amendment applies to government actions, and would be implicated in a legal challenge to the Amazon patents, since patents are issued and enforced by the government. In addition, Amazon patents can run afoul of state statutes and common law privacy protections, which have adopted similar Fourth Amendment privacy standards.Related: Here Are 6 Weird Ways You’re Being Tracked in the Real WorldArticle I Section 8, Clause 8 of the U.S. Constitution, also known as the Patent and Copyright Clause authorizes Congress to grant inventors and authors exclusive rights to their respective inventions and works of authorship for limited periods of time. Under current law, patents enjoy a 20-year monopoly period, backed by the power of Federal Government.The U.S. Constitution contains no express right to privacy. However, the Supreme Court, in numerous decisions since the 1920s, has relied on the Bill of Rights to carve out certain rights based on privacy considerations. These carved out rights include privacy of a person’s freedom from unreasonable search and seizure under the Fourth Amendment.The pulse on Amazon’s tracking mechanismThe Amazon patents describe a system and mechanism for tracking and guiding workers’ hands relative to the position of inventory storage bins. The stated aim of the patents is to improve the efficiency of inventory management system by making it faster and easier for workers to accurately locate the bins in which items are stored and retrieve ordered items from them. The Amazon patents criticize existing processes for keeping track of inventory bin locations as uneconomical and inefficient, and find proposed improvements in the form of a computer vision apparatus to track location of inventory bins inadequate as cumbersome and costly.Instead, the patents propose a system that uses ultrasonic communication to track employee hand movements by sending ultrasonic pulses at predetermined intervals to the worker’s wristband in order to keep track of the relative positions of the worker’s hands and the target inventory storage bins. The patented system directs the worker’s hands toward the correct bin by sending a pulse to alert the worker when the worker’s hands are in close proximity to a target bin.Related: 12 Privacy Mistakes that Can Cost You Your Job in 2018Amazon has dismissed potential privacy concerns raised by the implementation of its patents as “speculation” and “misguided.” In a released statement, Amazon analogized its proposed wristband system to handheld scanners, which are in widespread use for checking inventory and for fulfilling customer orders. According to the company, the wristbands and their accompanying mechanism improve efficiency by freeing up employees’ “hands from scanners and their eyes from computer screens.”The debate regarding the trade-off between privacy and efficiency at workplace is not new. Common worker monitoring techniques, including cameras, employer monitoring and access to employee emails and internet browsing, have been around since the 1990s. However, such concerns have come into renewed focus with the Amazon patents as they potentially cross the currently prevalent arena of surveillance and monitoring of employees into the uncharted territory of directing and even physical control of employees.The question regarding the Amazon patents is whether they will pass muster in the face of likely challenges to their constitutionality. Challenges to patents duly issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) are not new. Back in 2013, the Supreme Court found genes to be not eligible for patent protection. The legal precedentsAs noted above, because implementation of the Amazon patents in the workplace would involve obtaining potentially private information from employees, they would likely raise concerns about violation of workers’ constitutionally protected privacy rights. Amazon, in turn, has downplayed such concerns and has instead tried to focus the debate on the enhanced efficiency resulting from the introduction of its patented technology.The U.S. Supreme Court has identified certain factors that courts must consider in determining whether employer monitoring of employees and obtaining information from them passes legal muster. In City of Ontario v. Quon, the Supreme Court affirmed that workers do enjoy Fourth Amendment rights in their workplace to guarantee their “privacy, dignity and security of persons against certain arbitrary and invasive acts” by the government as an employer. Factors, identified in City of Ontario, which courts are to consider in determining the permissible scope of employer intrusion on its employee’s Fourth Amendment rights include: 1. whether the employee has a reasonable expectation of privacy in the information obtained; 2. whether the employer has a legitimate work-related rationale for the intrusion; 3. whether the intrusion is reasonable in scope; 4. availability of less intrusive means to achieve the same purpose; and 5. public acceptance of the conduct.Related: 10 Ways You’re Being Tracked Without You Knowing ItIn City of Ontario, the city had provided its employees with pagers which were used to send and receive text messages to allow employees to be contacted in the event of an emergency. The city’s employee policy manual made clear that the city had the right to access and monitor communications to and from the city issued pagers and that employers should not have any expectation of privacy or confidentiality in using the pagers. When Jeff Quon, a city employee with a city-issued pager, repeatedly exceeded the monthly character limit for use of his pager, the city ordered an audit of his communications to determine if the usage was work related. In conducting the review, the city discovered that most of the messages sent by Quon were not work related but were personal and many were of sexually explicit nature, and proceeded to implement disciplinary measures against Quon. Quon responded by filing suit against the city for violating his Fourth Amendment rights.Discussing the particular facts and circumstances of the case, the Supreme Court allowed for a certain extent of privacy in communications on the pagers provided by the city but concluded that expecting complete privacy would not be reasonable since Quon had been informed of the potential auditing of his messages and that his position as a law enforcement officer indicated his likely awareness of scrutiny of his actions and that such scrutiny may involve examination of his communications during the work hours. Next, the Supreme Court concluded that the search of Quon’s messages was motivated by a proper purpose, that it was tailored to the problem at hand and had been reasonable in scope. The Court did not give much weight to the availability of less intrusive methods by the city to achieve the same goal.Efficiency or privacy?With respect to the Amazon patents, the question before the courts will be whether the additional intrusive step of controlling and directing an employee is justified by the expected incremental improvement in efficiency and productivity resulting from the patents. In the long run, the answer may lie in the public’s acceptance of the trade-off between efficiency and privacy in response to new technology. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 7 min read Register Now »last_img read more

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