June 19, 2021
  • 3:25 am The culture of America through a sandwich
  • 3:23 am Applications open for Woman’s Club scholarship
  • 3:21 am Samuel Davis Jr. Appointed First Vice Chair of the APGA…
  • 3:19 am Owlis Dementis
  • 3:18 am March grants have been announced for District 10 businesses, individuals, non-profits

first_imguschools/iStockBy BENJAMIN SIEGEL, LUKE BARR and JACK DATE, ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Washington, D.C.’s top cop said the assault on the U.S. Capitol exposed “weaknesses in the security of the most secure city in the country” during a closed-door congressional briefing on Tuesday.“I was stunned at the tepid response from Department of the Army, which was reluctant to send the D.C. National Guard to the Capitol,” acting Metropolitan Police Department Chief Robert Contee told the House Appropriations Committee in written testimony obtained by ABC News. “While I certainly understand the importance of both planning and public perception — the factors cited by the staff on the call — these issues become secondary when you are watching your employees, vastly outnumbered by a mob, being physically assaulted.”“I was able to quickly deploy my force and issue directives to them while they were in the field, and I was honestly shocked that the National Guard could not — or would not — do the same,” he added.Contee spoke to the deadly toll of the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, noting that five people — including Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick — died as a result of the siege. He also revealed that an MPD officer, whom he identified as Jeffery Smith, died by suicide afterward. He is one of two responding officers to die by suicide following the attack — the other being Capitol Police officer Howard Liebengood, according to Contee.Among the more than 1,000 MPD officers who responded, 65 were injured during the riot, Contee also noted.“Other harm from this traumatic day will be widely felt but possibly unacknowledged,” Contee’s testimony stated. “Law enforcement training neither anticipates nor prepares for hours of hand-to-hand combat. Even brief physical fights are physically and emotionally draining.”The acting chief of the U.S. Capitol Police apologized to lawmakers during Tuesday’s briefing for not being more prepared for the attack.“Let me be clear: the Department should have been more prepared for this attack,” acting Chief Yogananda Pittman told the House Appropriations Committee, in opening remarks obtained by ABC News. “We knew that there was a strong potential for violence and that Congress was the target.”“I am here to offer my sincerest apologies on behalf of the Department,” she said in the remarks.Pittman confirmed that the panel supervising the department, the Capitol Police Board, rejected a request from then-Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund two days before the riot for National Guard troops.The Washington Post previously reported that the Capitol Police request was rejected by congressional security officials because they anticipated House and Senate leaders wouldn’t want troops stationed around the Capitol.Capitol Police activated more officers to work on Jan. 6 in anticipation of violence — including a SWAT team and civil disturbance units — but “we did not do enough,” Pittman said.Sund also asked permission to bring in the National Guard on Jan. 6, but was not granted authorization from the board “for over an hour,” Pittman told the House committee.Pittman also called the attack on the Capitol a “terrorist attack by tens of thousands of insurrectionists determined to stop the certification of Electoral College votes, the Department failed to meet its own high standards as well as yours.”“I do believe certain challenges the Department faced the day of the attack could have been overcome with additional preparation,” she said.Pittman also said that once the Capitol was breached their focus turned to the safety of members and leadership.A source familiar confirmed that the chiefs and assistant chiefs went silent on Jan. 6. Neither took control of the radio, the source said, and when officers were looking for leadership, there was none.Capitol Police Union Chairman Gus Papathanasiou told ABC News that there is currently no vote of no confidence underway against the acting chief and senior department leadership.“Officers have been calling for a vote of no confidence since Jan. 6,” Papathanasiou said. “At this time we have not initiated a vote of no confidence. Doesn’t mean we can’t think about it. There’s a big difference.”Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_img An Analysis Of A Possible $57 Million Dollar Breach Of Public Commitment By The StateIn the Spring of 2011, IU Medical School-Evansville Dean, Dr. Steve Becker and City Councilman, Dr. H. Dan Adams, began to discuss an idea that would make the new downtown IU Medical Center an educational composite for FOUR local schools in order to achieve “REAL TEAM CARE”. Ivy Tech was and still is an important part of that four school collage. When the very first preliminary rendering of the new IU Medical school campus in 2013 was presented to the Medical School Center creative team, Mayor Winnecke quickly signed off on the proposed project. The original architectural drawings had four separated, educational buildings designed in this project. The four were designed to house IU Medical School, USI Nursing School, U of E Nursing and PA programs and IVY Tech’s med tech students.After Dr. Adams explained to Skanska Contractors what “REAL TEAM CARE” concept was all about they immediately responded with the following architectural rendering posted on our cover page. We would like ask you to review the right side of the IU-Evansville Medical school building design. You will see that Ivy Tech’s med tech class rooms were indeed a major, contiguous part of the original plans for the downtown IU-Evansville Medical School campus?We distinctly remember the official vote by the IU Board of Trustee when a local TV Station carried the meeting live? A big tent was erected on the area of the proposed Medical School site with all the movers and shakers of this community in attendance. Right after the vote to approve the Downtown IU-Evansville Medical campus was taken, wine flowed like water in celebration of this event.Shortly after the vote, the promise that Ivy Tech would be a part of the new downtown Medical school seemed like a broken political promise. By including Ivy Tech in the original plans, City Council and Mayor Winnecke were able to guarantee the lump sum of $57 million, generously funding the downtown IU-Evansville Medical school complex.Sources tell us that during the mid-planning stage, Southwest Region Ivy Tech (Evansville) Chancellor, Jonathan Wienzapfel curiously demanded that the Ivy Tech educational pod be dramatically increased from 40,000 square feet to 60,000. This surprising addition really caused some concerns with the project planners. In fact, we were told at that point that Chancellor Wienzapfel’s influence with the project planners started to waiver. We have been told that the President of Ivy Tech, Dr. Sue Ellsperman, has told administrators at Ivy Tech-Evansville that any future comments concerning Ivy Tech’s role in the downtown Medical school is off limits.Mayor Winnecke and The Evansville City Council pledged to sell $57 million dollars of bonds to build a complex, state-of-the-art facility to house Indiana University Medical School-Evansville, University of Evansville Nursing and PA programs, Southern Indiana University nurses and Ivy Tech med tech students in the now-being-built downtown IU-Evansville Medical school complex. Like a thief in the night, the Indiana State Legislature quietly eliminated IVY Tech medical class room space from this project. We wonder if this shouldn’t be considered a “breach of the contract”  by adhering to the terms of the original public commitment they made?  If the entire $57 million worth of the construction bonds has been sold, we wonder if the Ivy Tech portion is being held in escrow, earning interest?We hope that the IVY Tech portion of the $57 million commitment to fund this project will be held in escrow, until the Mayor and City Council are able to resolve the issue of Ivy Tech’s role in the proposed downtown IU-Evansville Medical school project. It appears to thE CCO and many others that the State officials may have a possible “Breach of Public Commitment” issue, concerning this project.Finally, we are puzzled why members of the our Legislative delegation decided to quietly sit back and watch the State Education officials eliminated Ivy Tech’s funding from the proposed Downtown IU-Evansville Medical school without a political fight?FOOTNOTE: Todays “Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that our elected officials should push the State to include Ivy Tech in the IU-Evansville Medical school project?FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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