June 14, 2021
  • 8:10 am Go Ahead and Leave Santa Whole Milk!
  • 8:09 am Industry Reaction to Final EPA Rule on RVOs
  • 8:08 am Senate Sets Vote for Vilsack Confirmation
  • 10:58 pm New sorority recruits first pledge class
  • 10:58 pm “The Magnificent Seven” trots along the trail

first_imgNews By News Highland – April 4, 2013 Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Fianna Fail Education spokesperson Charlie Mc Conalogue has urged the Education Minister to listen to teachers and not to dismiss their concerns about the impact of cuts to frontline education services.Speaking after attending the annual conferences of the INTO, ASTI and TUI this week, the Donegal Deputy expressed concern about the increasingly fractious relationship between teachers and Minister Ruari Quinn.The TUI is to ballot its members for industrial action, up to and including strike action.Deputy Mc Conalogue admits his party  learned of the impact of cuts which were introduced by then education minister Mary Coughlan when his party was in government, and at this stage, it’s clear that enough is enough…..[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/charram.mp3[/podcast] Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Twitter WhatsApp WhatsApp Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal center_img Pinterest Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Facebook Google+ Mc Conalogue urges Quinn to listen to teachers’ concerns about cuts Previous articleGAA – Donegal and Cavan to meet again in Ulster FinalNext articleSenior Derry PSNI officer says people shouldn’t have to live in fear News Highland Google+ Facebook Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th last_img read more

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first_imgOct 4, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A powerful motivator for getting a seasonal influenza vaccine is having suffered through the misery of the disease.However, factors that sway people away from vaccination are a lack of information and outright misconceptions, the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) found in a consumer survey released at a press conference today. The conference, with some of the nation’s top health experts in attendance, marked the start of the flu immunization season.Julie Gerberding, MD, MPH, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said there will be 100 million seasonal influenza vaccine doses available this year, 17 million more than last year. However, Gerberding and other experts worry that Americans, particularly those with health risks, won’t take full advantage of the increased supply.”We’d like to see the highest-ever rates, especially among seniors,” she said. “The vaccine is here, and the time is now. Let’s make this our best flu season.”The study found that less than half of respondents (48%) planned to get a flu shot this year. The study, a random-dial telephone sample of 1,014 adults (503 men and 511 women) aged 18 and older, found that of the 52% who said they wouldn’t get a flu shot, 43% didn’t think influenza was serious enough to warrant vaccination.More than half of the respondents said they regarded a cold and influenza as similar health problems and would treat them similarly. Close to half—46%—of respondents incorrectly thought that flu vaccine could cause the illness itself.Better than half of those who planned to be immunized this year said they made vaccination a priority after suffering a bout of flu in a previous season, according to the survey.Study respondents knew that the period of September through November is the best time to be immunized—but they erroneously believed that December is too late to benefit from the vaccine.”We’d like to correct that perception,” said Susan J. Rehm, MD, NFID medical director and vice chair of the Department of Infectious Diseases at the Cleveland Clinic. The flu season peaks in December, January, and February, sometime even in March, she said.  “The medical community must reinforce that later-season vaccination is useful, even if the disease has already begun in your area.”Mark McClellan, MD, PhD, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said about a third of seniors don’t get annual flu shots, even though vaccination is free through Medicare part B. He noted that each year, 200,000 people are hospitalized with influenza, and 36,000 die of the disease.”There’s a prevention gap here that we see too often, and we’re working very hard to close it,” he said.Medicare officials are hoping to increase flu vaccination rates among seniors with a personalized, grassroots approach that focuses on preventive care, including vaccination and screening, McClellan said. Preventive services are now being promoted and delivered with the same system that administers the new Medicare prescription drug benefit, he said.Another group on which health experts are focusing their flu vaccine message is parents of children aged 6 months to 5 years. Earlier this year, the CDC added 2-, 3-, and 4-year-olds (and their household contacts) to its recommendations about who should receive the flu vaccine.Julia McMillan, MD, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics committee on infectious diseases and vice chair for pediatric education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said now is the time for parents to call their children’s pediatrician to schedule an appointment for vaccination. Children in the recommended age-group who have not been immunized before will need two doses, 1 month apart.”Rates aren’t what they should be, especially in kids who have chronic conditions such as asthma,” she said, noting that children who have chronic conditions are five times as likely as healthy children to be hospitalized with influenza.Health officials also said they’d like to make people more aware of the CDC recommendation that pregnant women should receive flu shots. In the NFID survey, less than half (49%) thought that pregnant women should be vaccinated.Healthcare workers are another group with relatively low vaccination rates, despite the CDC’s longstanding recommendation that they get annual flu shots. Only 36% of healthcare workers are vaccinated each year; unvaccinated workers contribute to flu outbreaks and staffing shortages in health care facilities.The CDC has issued stronger, earlier recommendations for healthcare workers, and in June the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) issued a new infection control standard that requires accredited organizations to offer flu immunizations to staff, volunteers, and others who have close contact with patients. The requirement takes effect Jan 1, 2007.Gerberding said vaccine manufacturers will deliver 75 million doses of vaccine by the end of October, and she hopes there will be fewer problems with uneven distribution of the vaccines this year. Because vaccine distribution is handled by the private sector, coordination can be difficult, she said. However, she added that the National Influenza Vaccine Summit, made up of 130 industry groups, has been working to resolve problems with supply and distribution.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Nikkei had dipped on Friday after Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s resignation stirred doubts about future fiscal and monetary stimulus policies.Those concerns were eased somewhat by news Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga, and a close ally of Abe, would join the race to succeed his boss. A slimmed-down leadership contest is likely around Sept. 13 to 15.The next event of note in Asia will be China’s official manufacturing PMI survey for August which is forecast to show a slight improvement to 51.2 as the recovery there continues.The United States ISM manufacturing survey is also expected to show a continued pick up in activity in August, while August payrolls on Friday are forecast to rise 1.4 million with the unemployment rate dipping to a still painfully-high 9.8 percent. Asian shares notched a fresh two-year high on Monday as investors wagered monetary and fiscal policies globally would stay super stimulatory for a protracted period, keeping the safe-haven dollar on the defensive.MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan added 0.2 percent to reach its highest since June 2018, extending a 2.8 percent rise last week.Tokyo’s Nikkei rallied 1.4 percent aided by news Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway had bought more than 5 percent stakes in each of the five leading Japanese trading companies. A host of Federal Reserve officials are set to speak this week, kicking off with Vice Chair Richard Clarida later Monday as they put more flesh on the bank’s new policy frameworkFed Chair Jerome Powell boosted stock markets last week by committing to keep inflation at 2 percent on average, allowing prices to run hotter to balance periods when they undershot.The risk of higher inflation in the future, assuming the Fed can get it there, was enough to push up longer-term Treasury yields and sharply steepen the yield curve.Yields on 30-year bonds jumped almost 16 basis points last week to stand at 1.508 percent, 137 basis points above the two-year yield. The spread was now approaching the June gap of 146 basis points which was the largest since late 2017.That shift was of little benefit to the US dollar given the prospect of short rates staying super-low for longer, and the currency fell broadly.Early Monday, the dollar index was down at 92.211 and just a whisker above the recent two-year low of 92.127. The euro edged higher to US$1.1915, having climbed 0.9 percent last week.Marshall Gittler, head of investment research at BDSwiss Group, noted speculators had already built up record levels of long positions in the euro which could work to limit further gains.“A truly crowded trade that will take more news to push higher,” he argued.The dollar did steady a little on the yen at 105.47, after dropping 1.1 percent on Friday before finding support in the 105.10/20 zone.In commodity markets, the drop in the dollar helped gold bounce to $1,974 an ounce.Oil prices steadied, having dipped on Friday after Hurricane Laura passed the heart of the US oil industry without causing any widespread damage.Brent crude futures rose 15 cents to $45.96 a barrel, while US crude gained 6 cents to $43.03.Topics :last_img read more

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