June 21, 2021
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first_imgLimerick Post Show | Ann Blake launches a new podcast TAGSInterviewlifestyleLimerick City and CountyLimerick Post Showlive at the docklandsmusicNewsvenuevideo Linkedin Limerick Post Show | Let’s Get Talking | Eating Disorders Limerick Post Show | Raging Sons release Someone Else’s Love LIVE At The Docklands kicks off on Friday night under the large blue and yellow tent that is the newly added feature to the Limerick docks.Dolans is almost twenty five years in the city and what started out as a small trad bar on the Dock Road has now developed into the largest music venue in Limerick.Valerie Dolan of Dolans, who is running the three day festival, gave a brief history of the iconic and award winning venue.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “We wanted a little trad pub and that’s what happened. It was very successful quite quickly within a few months and then we had to buy the warehouse as a fire exit.“We bought it and as the acts moved on, we moved on with them because as they were getting bigger crowds we needed bigger venues. We are so lucky and so looking forward on our 25th year in Limerick to have this beautiful marquee,” Valerie Dolan said.Mick and Valerie DolanLimerick to date has never had its own music festival spanning across an entire weekend but that is all about to change.“It is incredible, it’s what happens when people get together to do things. We’ve had great rapport with the docklands and with the council about this gig and it has made life so much easier.“The powers that be are behind this gig. They want things to happen in Limerick and things are happening and we are delighted to be part of it”, she added.The location is somewhat a mystery to the people of the city as it is a closed off area open only to shipping personnel but now there is an opportunity to get behind the great high grey walls.This weekend will see thousands of people travel along the Dock Road taking a turn down opposite Casey’s petrol station and into the magnificent marquee to dance the night away to the music acts. The performers are attracting a plethora of people to the city this weekend.“We are lucky as well that the bands have come. This is the first time Madness are in Limerick. We have had the orchestra before with Declan O’Rourke and The Coronas started in the upstairs venue in Dolans and there was only thirty people there.“So we have gone with the bands and the bands have come with us. We are really happy about that,” Valerie said.Dolans are celebrating a significant birthday in Limerick and plan on celebrating in style.“We are twenty five years in Limerick on the 19th of December so this is only part of a series of gigs that we want to do to celebrate our twenty fifth anniversary so hopefully all those bands will come back,” she added.The three day festival kicks off on Friday with ska group Madness taking to the stage. Saturday sees the ever popular Jenny Greene and the RTE orchestra along with Gemma Sugrue to help relive clubbing days. On Sunday firm favourites The Coronas will top off the bank holiday celebrations.For tickets and information on Live At The Docklands checkout dolans.ie. WhatsApp Email Facebook Printcenter_img Limerick Post Show | HUGG – Healing Untold Grief Groups Advertisement Twitter Previous article2FM celebrates 40 years at Docklands AfterPartyNext articleBreaking: Hometown headline show for Emma Langford Meghann Scully Limerick Post Show | Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick Post Show | Hunt Museum launch Sculpting Competition RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LifestyleNewsShowVideo‘As the acts moved on, we sort of moved on’ Valerie Dolan tells the Limerick Post ShowBy Meghann Scully – May 29, 2019 810 last_img read more

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first_imgSuzanne Dixon is already asking tough questions and taking the Appalachian Trail Conservancy in new directions.The Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC)’s new first female president and CEO, Suzanne Dixon, is intimately familiar with advocating for open spaces. Growing up in Ireland, she spent time as a youngster in its national parks. After moving to the U.S., the first park she visited was Shenandoah. “Protecting this open landscape excited me the most,” she saysAt her previous position at the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA), she was instrumental in securing the San Antonio Missions National Historical Park as a World Heritage Site (WHS) and in designating other sites and monuments. Afterward, while conversing with a San Antonio taxi driver about local relevance of the designation, he asked, “What does it mean for me?” That’s the question she continually tries to answer with her conservation work—especially now with the ATC.The 2,190-mile A.T. sees over 3 million visitors annually. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy’s founders in 1925 would be astonished at today’s 42,000 members and 6,500 volunteers. To continue this legacy, Dixon hopes to further connect the trail to communities and nearby towns so they can best leverage what’s right in their backyards.“I don’t have many days off lately, but I love to hike, bike, and spend time with my husband and dog. Soccer also has long been a big outlet for me, and I miss it. When I commit to something, I’m all in, so when I don’t have time to train, I won’t show up only to play.Last month, Dixon and the ATC launched its first official economic study of Appalachian Trail communities to look more deeply at the tourism benefits of the A.T. “We have to look beyond the footpath,” says Dixon. A.T hikers traveling to Damascus, for example, could also take advantage of the Virginia Creeper Trail. “These places have a shared identification, because the trail is contiguous,” Dixon says.Another question that Dixon often asks is: “Who’s not at the table?” Dixon suggests that we can learn what’s important to others and expand the tent of people caring about the A.T. Since voices of people of color are often underrepresented in conversations about parks and trails, Dixon says that one solution could be to look to the ATC’s Next Generation Advisory Council, which brings together a group of 18- to 34-year-olds to consult with Congressional leaders about conservation issues and barriers to outdoor recreation and employment. “Congress loves to see their excitement and hear from them,” says Dixon. “The ATC could definitely build on this.”The A.T. is not only about people. With a footprint of 250,000 acres, the A.T. protects one of the largest corridors of green space in the country. Preserving the trail preserves key habitat for species threatened by development and climate change. “The A.T. is ground zero for wildlife corridors,” says Dixon.The ATC also has been publicly opposed to the Mountain Valley Pipeline, which will burrow under the A.T. and run parallel to it for over 90 miles. The ATC will continue to refine its strategies for this and similar issues, since, as Dixon predicts, “The Mountain Valley Pipeline will not be the last pipeline proposed.”This year, the National Trails System Act celebrates its 50th anniversary. Dixon is keenly aware of the challenges presented by today’s divisive political climate, but she remains hopeful. “Public lands are nonpartisan,” she says. “How do we protect and preserve these places together?”In celebration of the National Trail Systems Act, Dixon will be speaking at the Wilderness Skills Institute, located in Pisgah Forest on Wednesday, May 30 at 6 p.m. You can rsvp and find more details here: https://www.facebook.com/events/195575244591682/last_img read more

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