June 19, 2021
  • 3:25 am The culture of America through a sandwich
  • 3:23 am Applications open for Woman’s Club scholarship
  • 3:21 am Samuel Davis Jr. Appointed First Vice Chair of the APGA…
  • 3:19 am Owlis Dementis
  • 3:18 am March grants have been announced for District 10 businesses, individuals, non-profits

first_imgCiting witnesses, including the mother of one of the victims, Bah reported that two men were killed by shots fired by soldiers – identifiable by their red berets – during clashes between protesters and security forces in a Conakry suburb on the evening of 7 November. News Reached by RSF, HAC president Martine Condé claimed that Bah “acknowledged that he had no evidence” when he appeared before the HAC on 12 November. This is disputed by Bah and contradicted by his article. RSF_en Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on Guinea’s media regulator, the High Authority for Communication (HAC), to reconsider its decision to suspend the accreditation of a reporter for two French media outlets for reporting that two civilians were shot dead by soldiers in a Conakry suburb last week. Guinea : RSF and AIPS call for release of two imprisoned journalists Guinean journalist’s continuing detention is “incomprehensible,” RSF says In response to a defence ministry complaint, the HAC announced that it had suspended Bah’s accreditation until February for “failing to verify information,” lack of “proof” and “lack of balance” in his report, which was carried by both RFI and AFP on 8 November. RFI issued a statement “deploring” the withdrawal of Bah’s accreditation and saying it was “astonished” to have received a HAC demand for a right of reply for the defence ministry, given that, in “repeated calls and messages,” Bah had tried to interview the Conakry police regional director and the ministry for security and civil protection’s spokesperson for RFI on 12 November. November 16, 2018 RSF asks Guinea’s regulator to restore correspondent’s accreditation RSF has copies of the messages Bah sent and a list of the calls he made on 8 November seeking reactions from representatives of the security forces, including the army high command’s spokesperson, the defence ministry’s spokesperson and the ruling party’s spokesperson. He failed to get an official comment. Bah is the correspondent of Radio France Internationale and Agence France-Presse. He is also RSF’s Guinea correspondent. In its statement, the HAC said that no new request by Bah for accreditation would be considered “before the end of February 2019.” GuineaAfrica Protecting sources “This journalist did his job by interviewing witnesses in order to establish the facts of the deadly events of the evening of 7 November,” said Head of RSF’s Africa desk Arnaud Froger. “An experienced journalist known for his professionalism, he repeatedly tried to get the army’s version throughout the following day, without getting any response. We therefore call on the HAC to reconsider and to allow him to resume working.” Mouctar Bah, correspondant de RFI, AFP, et RSF. Photo : mediaguinee.org/ Guinean journalist finally freed after being held for nearly three months GuineaAfrica Protecting sources Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Guinea Pointing out that the journalist, Mouctar Bah, did everything possible to obtain the army’s version of the shooting before filing his story, RSF asks the HAC to allow Bah to continue working as an accredited reporter. to go further Receive email alerts News April 15, 2021 Find out more Guinea is ranked 104th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. News Organisation May 19, 2021 Find out more News April 9, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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first_imgOct 4, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A powerful motivator for getting a seasonal influenza vaccine is having suffered through the misery of the disease.However, factors that sway people away from vaccination are a lack of information and outright misconceptions, the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) found in a consumer survey released at a press conference today. The conference, with some of the nation’s top health experts in attendance, marked the start of the flu immunization season.Julie Gerberding, MD, MPH, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said there will be 100 million seasonal influenza vaccine doses available this year, 17 million more than last year. However, Gerberding and other experts worry that Americans, particularly those with health risks, won’t take full advantage of the increased supply.”We’d like to see the highest-ever rates, especially among seniors,” she said. “The vaccine is here, and the time is now. Let’s make this our best flu season.”The study found that less than half of respondents (48%) planned to get a flu shot this year. The study, a random-dial telephone sample of 1,014 adults (503 men and 511 women) aged 18 and older, found that of the 52% who said they wouldn’t get a flu shot, 43% didn’t think influenza was serious enough to warrant vaccination.More than half of the respondents said they regarded a cold and influenza as similar health problems and would treat them similarly. Close to half—46%—of respondents incorrectly thought that flu vaccine could cause the illness itself.Better than half of those who planned to be immunized this year said they made vaccination a priority after suffering a bout of flu in a previous season, according to the survey.Study respondents knew that the period of September through November is the best time to be immunized—but they erroneously believed that December is too late to benefit from the vaccine.”We’d like to correct that perception,” said Susan J. Rehm, MD, NFID medical director and vice chair of the Department of Infectious Diseases at the Cleveland Clinic. The flu season peaks in December, January, and February, sometime even in March, she said.  “The medical community must reinforce that later-season vaccination is useful, even if the disease has already begun in your area.”Mark McClellan, MD, PhD, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said about a third of seniors don’t get annual flu shots, even though vaccination is free through Medicare part B. He noted that each year, 200,000 people are hospitalized with influenza, and 36,000 die of the disease.”There’s a prevention gap here that we see too often, and we’re working very hard to close it,” he said.Medicare officials are hoping to increase flu vaccination rates among seniors with a personalized, grassroots approach that focuses on preventive care, including vaccination and screening, McClellan said. Preventive services are now being promoted and delivered with the same system that administers the new Medicare prescription drug benefit, he said.Another group on which health experts are focusing their flu vaccine message is parents of children aged 6 months to 5 years. Earlier this year, the CDC added 2-, 3-, and 4-year-olds (and their household contacts) to its recommendations about who should receive the flu vaccine.Julia McMillan, MD, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics committee on infectious diseases and vice chair for pediatric education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said now is the time for parents to call their children’s pediatrician to schedule an appointment for vaccination. Children in the recommended age-group who have not been immunized before will need two doses, 1 month apart.”Rates aren’t what they should be, especially in kids who have chronic conditions such as asthma,” she said, noting that children who have chronic conditions are five times as likely as healthy children to be hospitalized with influenza.Health officials also said they’d like to make people more aware of the CDC recommendation that pregnant women should receive flu shots. In the NFID survey, less than half (49%) thought that pregnant women should be vaccinated.Healthcare workers are another group with relatively low vaccination rates, despite the CDC’s longstanding recommendation that they get annual flu shots. Only 36% of healthcare workers are vaccinated each year; unvaccinated workers contribute to flu outbreaks and staffing shortages in health care facilities.The CDC has issued stronger, earlier recommendations for healthcare workers, and in June the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) issued a new infection control standard that requires accredited organizations to offer flu immunizations to staff, volunteers, and others who have close contact with patients. The requirement takes effect Jan 1, 2007.Gerberding said vaccine manufacturers will deliver 75 million doses of vaccine by the end of October, and she hopes there will be fewer problems with uneven distribution of the vaccines this year. Because vaccine distribution is handled by the private sector, coordination can be difficult, she said. However, she added that the National Influenza Vaccine Summit, made up of 130 industry groups, has been working to resolve problems with supply and distribution.last_img read more

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first_imgScience Daily 16 July 2012Poor people hold more traditional values toward marriage and divorce than people with moderate and higher incomes, UCLA psychologists report in the current issue of the Journal of Marriage and Family. The findings are based on a large survey about marriage, relationships and values, analyzed across income groups. They raise questions about how effectively some $1billion in government spending to promote the value of marriage among the poor is being spent. “A lot of government policy is based on the assumption that low-income people hold less traditional views about marriage,” said Benjamin Karney, a UCLA professor of psychology and senior author of the study. “However, the different income groups do not hold dramatically different views about marriage and divorce — and when the views are different, they are different in the opposite direction from what is commonly assumed. People of low income hold values that are at least as traditional toward marriage and divorce, if not more so.”http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120716163241.htmlast_img read more

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