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first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Wales coach Warren Gatland said his team had become “battle-hardened” thanks to facing the big three from the southern hemisphere on a regular basis. Wales have played South Africa twice, New Zealand three times and Australia once in the last year. They beat Ireland 19-13 at the Millennium Stadium on Saturday, and Gatland praised their gutsy defence as they managed to prevent Ireland from scoring a last minute try.“We were never as bad as people were making out,” said Gatland. “We’ve had a poor run of results but we have been facing the best teams in the world. When I became Wales coach I wanted to play New Zealand, South Africa and Australia as often as possible, because that’s the only way you’re going to get better.“Against Scotland we showed more composure and maturity, and we dug deep today – previously we might have conceded that try (at the end of the match).”Defence coach Shaun Edwards added: “We probably couldn’t have held on if we hadn’t played teams like South Africa, New Zealand and Australia – we probably would have conceded that try. We have become battle-hardened.” CARDIFF, WALES – MARCH 12: Wales players Paul James (r) and Jamie Roberts celebrates on the final whistle after the RBS Six Nations Championship match between Wales and Ireland at the Millennium Stadium on March 12th, 2011 in Cardiff, Wales. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) Gatland and captain Matthew Rees were also pleased with how well Wales managed to match Ireland’s physicality, something that his team have been working on in recent years. “We’ve got a good pack of forwards who have come a long way,” said Rees. “Physically when we’ve played South Africa we’ve matched them or even come out on top.“We were disappointed with our first half today but we played well in the second half. This is a huge win for us, and we’re now looking forward to France next week.”last_img read more

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first_img Keith Matthews will celebrate his 100th cap when he lines out for Connacht this Friday against Edingburgh (The Sportsground – ko 19.45 01/04/11) The 28 year old centre joined Connacht from Munster in 2005 and has been a regular feature in the Connacht squad. “I was on a development contract down in Munster when Brads (Michael Bradley) phoned me and offered me a spot, I jumped at the chance to play regular Magners League and haven’t looked back since.” “It’s taken a while to get to this milestone; I’ve had a few injuries along the way. Amongst other injuries I damaged my crutiate ligament against Munster in ‘07 and was out for 9 months so that didn’t help but I’m delighted to reach 100 caps for Connacht, it’s a huge personal achievement.” Keith made his debut in Connacht’s 13 – 9 victory over the Cardiff Blues in September ‘05 alongside John Muldoon, Current Assistant Coach Dan McFarland and Video Analyst Conor McPhillips. He has scored 14 tries for the Province and set up dozens more with his hard running and ferocious tackling. “I’ve been involved in some great games over the years, beating Munster here at The Sportsground 2 years ago, beating Bourgoin in the quarter final of the Amlin Challenge Cup here last season and captaining the side against Munster on St Stephens Day this year. Hopefully there’ll be many more to come, I’m enjoying my rugby more than ever and playing some of the best rugby of my career so I’ve no intention of giving up just yet!” Matthews was part of Michael Bradleys 2009 Ireland ‘A’ side which won the Churchill Cup, beating England Saxons in the final. That team also included Connacht’s John Muldoon and Sean Cronin. Hooker Adrian Flavin could also earn his 100th cap this weekend. The 5’11, 102kg number 2 from Harrow in London joined Connacht in 2006. He will feature from the bench for the match this weekend. Connacht face Edinburgh this Friday in round 19 of the Magners League. Kick- off is at 7.45 in The Sportsground and the match is being shown live on TG4. Connacht XV to face Edinburgh: 1 Ronan Loughney2 Sean Cronin3 Jamie Hagan4 Mike McCarthy5 Bernie Upton6 Andrew Browne7 Johnny O’Connor8 Ray Ofisa9 Frank Murphy10 Ian Keatley11 Fionn Carr12 Keith Matthews LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 13 Troy Nathan14 Brian Tuohy15 Gavin Dufffy16 Adrian Flavin17 Brett Wilkinson18 Rodney Ah You19 Mike McComish20 John Muldoon21 Mark Dolan 22 Eoin Griffin23 Shane Monahan TAGS: Connacht last_img read more

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first_imgAs ever Lancaster put on a stoic public face, despite outcry at the exclusions of Danny Cipriani, Nick Easter and Luther Burrell, who had been dumped for England’s cause célèbre, Sam Burgess, reasserting that he was confident in his selection policy.Selection issues: Sam Burgess’s inclusion created an unnecessary sideshow to England’s preparationAny air of conviction dissipated further in the clammy Parisien air in August, where a pedestrian France were made to look like world-beaters, outmuscling and outthinking an England side who looked leggy and bereft of ideas.Despite a win over Ireland, England tip-toed bashfully into the World Cup in anything but tub-thumping fashion despite the incessant PR campaign swirling around them.The end was swift. England lasted just 16 days at their own World Cup. A calamitous denouement to four years of planning and hyperbole. First Wales had the Red Rose teetering with a sluggers desperate punch after a late Gareth Davies try, before Michael Cheika’s streetwise Wallabies landed the knockout blow with a performance of enterprise and guile that England lacked.To hear a cacophony of boos and catcalls at the end of the game must have been acutely painful for the proudest of Englishmen.At the press conference after the game, Lancaster was ashen-faced, still clearly in shock. He said his future would be in the hands of others, while applauding the Pool’s escapees, Australia and Wales. Honourable to the end, his body language – slumped shoulders, eyes downcast – suggested a man waiting for the inevitable.Video nasty: Stuart Lancaster, Graham Rowntree and Andy Farrell watch as England lose to AustraliaThat it’s taken the RFU 41 days to make the decision, is in part so as not to deflect attention from a joyous, wondrous tournament but while other sides bowed out of the competition, reputations intact, English rugby had already started to tear itself apart, with petty Twitter spats, player-coach fallouts, newspaper leaks about unrest and Mike Brown bemoaning a loss of trust between players.After a heart-to-heart with Ritchie yesterday, today’s announcement will have come as some sort of small mercy for Lancaster, who can now take time away from the game, to ponder his next move.While a move ‘upstairs’ within the RFU was this evening ruled out, his wealth of knowledge, hard-earnt experience and respect within the game, means a new challenge shouldn’t be far way.For the new England coach – which seems likely to come from outside England for the first time ever – his job will be to unify, inspire and walk the political tightrope, in order to build a team to be genuine contenders for Japan 2019. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A man alone: Stuart Lancaster has left his role as head coach after a distastrous World Cup campaign TAGS: Highlight There was a solemn air at Twickenham as Stuart Lancaster was relieved of his duties after nearly four years in charge but change was required after World Cup humiliation When looking at how England have found themselves coach-less 11 days after their own World Cup finished, it’s only right and proper to rewind to January 2012 when Stuart Lancaster was appointed as interim head coach in the wake of the calamitous 2011 Rugby World Cup campaign.Most casual rugby fans first question was, ‘Stuart who?’ The low-key Cumbrian barely registered on public’s consciousness, especially in comparison to the man he succeeded, Martin Johnson, England’s revered World Cup winning captain.However, with England reeling from a tournament in which their character and judgement was ridiculed and attacked in equal measure, Lancaster’s disarming humility and rigid moral compass was a counter-point to the chaos that had preceded him.With RFU Chief Exec Ian Ritchie himself just becoming accustomed to his plush new environs in TW2, Lancaster’s audition for the full-time role went almost too well.Resigned to his fate: Stuart Lancaster and Ian Ritchie felt it best if England had a fresh startThe last vestiges of the 2003 World Cup winning side were ushered into retirement and a new swathe of players, many of whom he’d nurtured on England Saxons duty, were welcomed into the bosom of Team England. Four wins and a solitary loss to Wales, thanks to a late Scott Williams try, nevertheless left England with a feel good factor that meant reservations about his lack of experience and suitability to the role full-time were cast aside.Lancaster was given the job full-time.There followed three further Six Nations campaigns, where England finished eternal bridesmaids, winning more often than not, showing spirit, doggedness and a flickering of bums-off-seats talent. And yet every time they threatened to lift the Six Nations trophy they slipped up, showing naivity, a lack of concentration or plain bad luck.In 2013, it was again Wales, where the acting Wales coach Rob Howley had given Lancaster the most chastening day of his career to date in Cardiff’s cauldron winning 30-3.For every loss, the same platitudes were trotted out about seeing improvement and learning from mistakes under pressure. In 2014 it was France’s Gael Fickou who broke English hearts late on – you see a theme emerging – in the tournament’s opening weekend, before four wins on the trot saw them waiting in an Italian hotel to see Ireland snatch the Six Nations championship from them.Finest hour: Stuart Lancaster and his England coaches celebrate a stunning win over the All Blacks in 2012The first signs of stagnation came in the summer of 2014 with a 3-0 Series loss All Blacks. This was followed by losses to New Zealand and South Africa in the Autumn. Less than a year out from the World Cup, faith in Lancaster’s ability to hoist a home World Cup was being openly questioned for the first time.Earlier this year, despite Robbie Henshaw’s baletic leap again consigned them to another second-placed finish– they had cast aside their stereotype of pragmatism with a giddy 18 tries on the way to a rip-roaring 55-35 win over France, with gifted duo George Ford and Jonathan Joseph to the fore. England’s attacking licence and home advantage left Southern Hemisphere sides, and many shrewd commentators alike predicting a New Zealand v England final.Sadly, from there it started slowly unraveling. Within weeks, Dylan Hartley and Manu Tuilagi were excluded from the World Cup reckoning for disciplinary problems on and off the field. The final laborious reduction, from an initial bloated 51-man squad to 31, seemed plodding and lacking in clarity. The in-tray will be overflowing but there is a gilt-edged opportunity for an ambitious individual to become the best-paid coach in World Rugby.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

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first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Sale Sharks School run: Pozniak attacking for Manchester Grammar (pic by Eugene Pozniak) Sevens. The nemesis of a lock. We lanky, gangly and distinctly uncoordinated second-rows are not built for the sport designed to bring more exhaustion than a full 80 minutes, more sprinting than we do in a season, and all the handling that we spend eight months a year trying to avoid. For some, Rosslyn Park is a haven on the outskirts of the bustling metropolis, but for some of us it is hell on earth. That said, with the likes of Brodie Retallick and Maro Itoje revolutionising the role of the second-row, sevens presents the perfect opportunity to develop my ‘all-court’ game.Modern lock: Maro Itoje in training with EnglandBuild-upDue to our success in the Lancashire Cup, our preparations for the sevens season was somewhat delayed; the semi-final versus Lancaster Grammar was a mere week before our first sevens tournament and meant that we still had a 15s mindset, and mentally weren’t quite ready for the more expansive form of the beautiful game. Alas, when our cup dream ran short, we were plunged into the depths of unspeakable fitness sessions with our somewhat psychopathic coach; a man who takes pleasure in finding the latest and most effective ways to beast the human body and mind in a quest for physical and mental strength. These sessions mainly involved intense series of sprints, the infamous three-minute run (try line to every other line and back with down-and-ups) as well as several sets of progressively increasing distances of sprinting. All of these drills were of course conducted with due manipulation, so that we were misinformed in order to ensure that we weren’t strategically pacing ourselves to avoid pure exhaustion, and that we ended up giving everything. In the week before our first tournament on Wednesday, we managed to squeeze in two specific sevens sessions where we had to relearn all the different aspects in a relatively short space of time.TuesdayThe day before our first tournament was as quiet and relaxed as one would expect; following a bit of a lie in, rousing at 7.30am and sauntering into school at a reasonable time, we had a brief run-through during the lunchtime, just to go through restarts and patterns in wake of the imminent tournament. This light session was thrown into the midst of an average school day and was neither strenuous nor stressful, as the only thing being challenged was our skill-set, trying to develop our sense for the game as well as our capacity to spread the ball wide across the pitch. That evening, with AS-levels fast approaching brought with it some light reading and some notes on the Supreme Court, in a pre-emptive effort to catch up the work I was to miss the following day, all before some carb-loading. The key problem I have always had with sevens is the little injuries and niggles brought on by overworking; in response to this I worked hard on my rehab and made sure that I was in an appropriate physical state for the season. For example last year at Rosslyn I had the beginning of my hip flexor problem, and the year before a slight calf strain was eating away at my speed and agility throughout the sevens period. In terms of rehab, I have a programme from our great team at Sale Sharks aiming to redress my muscular imbalance and relieve tension in the hip area. All in all, it was a relaxed and comfortable schedule before the tournament the following day.Food10 Weetabix – Breakfast 6amToast – Mid-Morning Snack at 10.30amPastrami Sandwich – Lunch at 2pmBagel with cream cheese – Snack at 4pmTomato Pasta with chicken breast – Dinner at 7pmGlass of milk – before bed at 10pmWednesday Stonyhurst School TournamentWe arose at a slightly earlier hour than usual; having to be at school to leave at 8am on the dot. Just before I was due to set off to school, I received an email saying that the tournament at Stonyhurst had been rained off, but that we would now be playing at Giggleswick. No matter what. The coach journey was long, and the performances average for the most part, interspersed with passages of sheer brilliance, but we managed to play five games almost back to back and were able to demonstrate that when the time came to it, we could play some really great sevens. I felt I’d given a reasonable account of myself, and although my lungs were burning and hamstrings tight it felt great to get the first run-out out of the system. Whilst my post-tournament meal could be argued by some to be “bad for you,” “overly calorific,” or “dangerously high in monosodium glutamate,” so what, I won’t deny the fact – but I bloody earned it. Food10 Weetabix – Breakfast at 7.30am2 bananas – Before leaving at 9amPack of jaffa cakes – On the bus at around 10am Jelly babies – During our short break at around 2amFrijj Milkshake – After the last game at 3amDomino’s Large Half and Half Meatilicious/ Ranch BBQ Pizza – Home at 7pmSetting the scene: Rosslyn Park’s groundThursday, Friday and the weekendThe day after a tournament you are somewhat brought back to reality as you realise that no one really cares how many tries you scored (none, in my case) and nor do teachers particularly care how you fared throughout the day or your excuse for not having completed the work they’d set. I had missed the last two hours of philosophy lessons due to rugby and thus had no idea who Irenaeus was – all I was thinking about as I tried to catch up was my next meal and when I’d get chance to foam roll my hip flexors. As well as this, I’d be missing three days of school the following week for Rosslyn Park so decided to speak to my teachers early on and get going with my work.Saturday brought the now typical essay, this time questioning the necessity of the afterlife. Thrilling stuff. Saturday night, however, and hopefully to the relief of Mark Bennett of Bristol Rugby (below), I watched the Six Nations at a mate’s house before his party, demonstrating that I am in fact in possession of a social life.Training day: Mark Bennett sets out bags for Wales trainingMonday and TuesdayAs we edged slowly towards our Rosslyn Park judgement day, the anticipation began to set in. Injuries revealed themselves, selections were made, and we saw the pinnacle of sevens play in our final session on Monday night before we left on Tuesday.Preparation for the tournament was notably light due to the structure of the season, but we were able to get in some work on handling in the sessions before Rosslyn and we backed our fitness from our sessions with our First and Second XV coaches – the latter being a successful Iron Man, so no stranger to pain. The conglomeration of indoor and outdoor fitness, from cycling and rowing in the gym at lunchtime to sprinting out on the field after school, meant that we were a reasonably fit side, and were able to back a consistent level of performance.On the coach journey down I had a fair amount of History reading planned, but as all the best things in life seem to be – it didn’t quite go to plan. We were advised to keep moving, so there would be the occasional stop and stroll around at the service station, but the main challenge of the journey was to not cramp up or get stiff, so there was a fair amount of walking around and stretching on the bus, just to keep loose.Monday/Tuesday foodWeetabixToastSandwichPasta(Jaffa cakes, bananas and muffins on the coach)The tournamentAs everyone knows, they put all the most exciting sevens teams as far away from the main pitch to ensure that everyone gets a good view of the seemingly infinite sprawl of land that the tournament boasts. Whilst we were somewhat away from the action when we arrived, our spirits were not dampened, as we played a solid, industrious brand of sevens throughout the day. All of the games we played were there for the taking, with the first match of the day, also our only victory, seeming the most difficult, as we proceeded to marginally throw every single game after that through simple mistakes at the end of passages of immense work. Anyway, we of course took the customary strolls around the stalls and watched how sevens was meant to be played, a revelation to myself and my fellow lock, both of whom had somehow ended up tagging along to this exhibition of speed and agility – not looking a step out of place, might I add. Despite this the day was still enjoyable, and we played some really nice stuff at times. The evening brought exhaustion and a team trip to Pizza Express, and with my post-tournament dietary routine, who needs protein shakes when you’ve got pizza?FoodHotel breakfast (full English: beans, bacon, sausage, hash browns, tomato) – Breakfast at 8 amSnacks of jelly babies, jaffa cakes and bananas – Interspersed throughout the day This time Sale Sharks Academy lock Charlie Pozniak gives us a weekly diary as Manchester Grammar prepared for the Rosslyn Park sevens… Calzone from Pizza Express – Dinner 7 pmTo find out more about best practices for grass-roots rugby, check out the Rugby Innovation Summitlast_img read more

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first_imgPower packed: Ross Moriarty put in a huge shift at No 8 against EnglandThe abrasive No 8 had been in sparkling form in defence, walloping English carriers on the gain line and, more often than not, rocking them back. It was these kinds of tackles that allowed Warburton and Justin Tipuric to flood forward on to the breakdown and do damage to England’s ball retention.Just as there was at blindside, there were several standout performances at No 8 this week, with Jamie Heaslip and Louis Picamoles also worthy of note here. World-class: Owen Farrell put in another hugely influential performance By Alex ShawRound two of the 2017 RBS Six Nations is in the book and the upcoming rest week gives us all a little longer to digest it.From Ireland blitzing Italy in Rome to the fiery and physical Anglo-Welsh affair in Cardiff, the tournament delivered in emphatic fashion this weekend and was fittingly crowned with a breathless encounter between France and Scotland in Paris on Sunday.The results ended the Grand Slam hopes of Wales and Scotland, but the tournament looks more competitive than ever, with just one loss from England enough to see them reabsorbed into the chasing pack and a five-horse race for the title emerging.We dug deep into each game and came up with our XV of the week.15. Stuart Hogg, ScotlandNot a vintage weekend for full-backs if truth be told but aside from coughing up possession late in the game, Stuart Hogg didn’t put a foot wrong against France and extended his try-scoring streak in the competition to four games.With ball in hand, there is no better full-back in the northern hemisphere and he showed that again this week with his balanced running style, two hands on the ball and dangerous footwork.14. Jack Nowell, EnglandJonny May was sacrificed for Nowell to be brought into the XV, a decision surely made in part due to England’s inability to break the gain line against France and the Exeter man delivered.Safe pair of hands: Jack Nowell put in a fine all-round performanceHe may not have torn Wales apart with big gains but his tendency to step inside from his wing saw him beat the first tackler on numerous occasions and his average of just over 5m per carry was representative of his outing, with constant, short gains on all his carries, rather than one big run weighting the statistics.13. Garry Ringrose, IrelandIreland’s win over Italy had a feeling of shooting fish in a barrel towards the end but that should not detract from Ringrose’s classy performance in Rome.The young outside-centre delivered equally in attack and defence and his nimbleness and ability to change direction in the moments just prior to taking contact saw him break numerous tackles and keep the Italian defence on the back foot.12. Owen Farrell, EnglandWhilst England struggle to meet their own expectations as a team, Owen Farrell continues to turn in effective performances and deliver in the most crucial of moments. It’s no longer just kicking under pressure, it’s his leadership and execution of skill in times of adversity.His pinpoint pass to Elliot Daly unleashed the winger to score the try which ultimately won the game for England, whilst his powerful tackling made him an impenetrable wall in defence.11. Craig Gilroy, IrelandThis could easily have gone to Simon Zebo or Keith Earls, but Gilroy’s second half hat-trick – after being subbed on in the 48th minute – was a showcase in the kind of ball-tracking, support and work rate that every coach wants from their wings.Flyer: Craig Gilroy rattled up a hat-trick of tries in an eye-catching performanceThe game may have been won by the time Gilroy entered the fray but in this age of physical beasts and athletic sprinters on the wing, sometimes we don’t give enough credit to simply scoring tries and being a clinical finisher.10. Dan Biggar, WalesWearing a rib injury suffered in the opening week against Italy and under pressure from the impressive Sam Davies on the bench, Dan Biggar delivered a very polished performance when it was most needed against England on Saturday.It won’t be much relief for Welsh fans who long for a more fluid attack, but Biggar’s defensive performance was excellent. From an intercept that almost led to a wonderful solo try to the little details, such as his unwillingness to release as a tackler until the last possible moment, Biggar played a very positive role in Wales’ near-miss.9. Rhys Webb, WalesWebb’s proclivity for addressing the referee aside, the scrum-half had a fine game against England, including plenty of savvy in and around the breakdown. After a rip-roaring weekend of Six Nations action, there are an abundance of worthy candidates for the team of the round in a Lions year LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Bossing it: Rhys Webb controlled the game around the fringesHe delivered the quick ball Biggar needed, organised his forwards well and, like any good scrum-half, got away with as much as the referee would let him. A few more snipes around the fringes to keep opposition defences honest and Webb will be throwing his name into the British and Irish Lions hat.1. Cyril Baille, FranceThis was a tough contest with Cian Healy, who laid down a strong marker on his return to the Ireland starting XV, but the Toulouse loosehead exerted just a little more dominance over his opposite number than the Irishman.Ominously for the other five nations, France are beginning to combine their power up front with a desire and ability to play at something much closer to regular Test match intensity and young prop Baille has been an important cog in that development.2. Niall Scannell, IrelandA late addition to the starting XV after captain Rory Best was deemed unfit, Scannell looked to the manor born in Test rugby on his debut.Heir apparent: Niall Scannell showed their could be life after Rory BestHe contributed well at the set-piece, carried effectively and defended efficiently. With Ireland’s lineout previously highlighted as an issue, Scannell did a good job of putting himself forward as a potential solution in the remaining three games of the championship.3. Dan Cole, EnglandThe Leicester Tiger did his British and Irish Lions ambitions no harm at all with a very impressive showing at the Principality Stadium, out scrummaging Rob Evans in an encouraging outing from England’s tight five.His body position and bind were both good and he was a pivotal part in one of, if not England’s best scrummaging display under Eddie Jones. His spoiling work at the breakdown was also noteworthy.4. Joe Launchbury, EnglandWith Maro Itoje partnering Launchbury in the engine room and Courtney Lawes on the blindside, England seemed to find a better balance against Wales than they showed against France, a week previously.The Wasps lock carried well, keeping England on the front-foot around the fringes, defended relentlessly and showed his impressive conditioning, finishing the game just as strongly as he started it.5. Sebastien Vahaamahina, FranceThis writer has been critical of France’s ability to play an up-tempo game due to the conditioning of their larger forwards but Vahaamahina proved that wrong on Sunday, turning in a very energetic performance as Les Bleus subdued a confident Scottish side.Tackling and hitting breakdowns for a full 80-minute shift, Vahaamahina was a significant part of the physical dominance that France had over Scotland in Paris.6. CJ Stander, IrelandThe South African-born back-rower was at his dominant best in Rome, powering his way through the beleaguered Italian defence. He joined Gilroy in grabbing a hat-trick and is the first forward to do so in Six Nations history.CJ Stander’s  ability to shift the point of contact made him a nightmare for the Italian players to bring down and you could count on one hand how many of his 22 carries saw him stopped in a one-on-one tackle.Honourable mentions are certainly due for Lawes and Sam Warburton.7. Kevin Gourdon, FranceThis Frenchman is an under the radar candidate for player of the tournament, such has been his impact in the opening two rounds of the tournament.Against Scotland on Sunday, Gourdon’s tackles on the gain line hit Scottish carriers like pistons. He seemed to be omnipresent on the pitch, constantly popping up at the breakdown or with incisive carries, both of which helped France maintain the tempo they needed.8. Ross Moriarty, WalesMaybe Wales were wilting overall as a team late in the game but it is hard to ignore the momentum swing that followed the decision to take Moriarty off the pitch. TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

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first_img Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service Por Pat McCaughanPosted Mar 8, 2012 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Episcopal News Service] Relatos de fe y de testimonio personal animaron la histórica “Nueva Reunión Comunitaria”, que tuviera lugar en San Diego, California, del 29 de febrero al 3 de marzo, a la que asistieron unas 300 personas —asiáticos, negros, latinos y nativoamericanos— clérigos y laicos de todo el ámbito de la Iglesia Episcopal.El compromiso comunitario, el centrarse en la misión y la colaboración, estuvieron al tope de la agenda del evento, que sesionaría bajo el lema de “Reclamar nuestra misión; reinterpretar nuestros contextos y renovar nuestras comunidades”.Organizada a través de la Oficina de Ministerios Étnicos de la Iglesia Episcopal, la reunión constituyó un desafío para los entusiastas participantes —así como para la Iglesia en general— de abrazar la renovación a través de la misión creadora, compartir recursos y responder al contexto étnico y comunitario.“Había la sensación de que la oportunidad estaba madura para esta histórica reunión”, dijo el Rdo. Winfred Vergara, misionero para el Ministerio Episcopal Asioamericano. “Es sencillamente un tiempo de compartir alegrías y esperanzas y de repensar posibilidades”.“Debemos encontrar resonancia en las experiencias mutuas, porque hemos experimentado el rechazo, y porque tenemos la capacidad para la acogida y el abrazo”, afirmó. “El Espíritu está aquí, expresando que podemos acercarnos los unos a los otros debido a las dolorosas experiencias comunes y a la visión común de la esperanza”.Todos fueron bienvenidos a asistir a la reunión, aunque el foco era el multiculturalismo. La idea para el evento surgió de los festivales multiétnicos de la Convención General y de las conferencias de discernimiento vocacional para jóvenes adultos de color, pero [este] fue el primer evento en su clase de desarrollo de liderazgo, añadió Vergara.La obispa primada, Katharine Jefferts Schori, saludo a los participantes el 1 de marzo a través de Skype desde Taiwán, mientras Bonnie Anderson, la presidenta de la Cámara de Diputados, se dirigió a la reunión durante la sesión plenaria del 3 de marzo sobre vocación y discernimiento laicos. El obispo Stacy Sauls, jefe de operaciones de la Iglesia Episcopal, presidió un oficio de comisión, y entre los presentadores se contaban el Muy Rdo. Michael Battle, del Instituto de Batalla por la Paz [PeaceBattle Institute Inc.],  de Raleigh, Carolina del Norte, y el Dr. Rodger Nishioka, profesor asociado de educación cristiana en el Seminario Teológico de Columbia, en Decatur, Georgia.La Rda. Angela Ifill, misionera de la Iglesia Episcopal para el ministerio de los negros, dijo que ella esperaba que los participantes continuarían utilizando percepciones adquiridas y que aprovecharían futuras oportunidades “de aunar esfuerzos para entenderse unos a otros a partir de nuestras diversas comunidades y para apreciar la perspectiva de cada cual… y un sentido de que esto es bueno y que necesitamos seguir haciéndolo”.Recuperar la misión: una historia de RichmondLa Rda. Lynne Washington, vicaria de la iglesia episcopal de San Pedro [St. Peter’s] en Richmond, Virginnia, describió cómo la congregación se esforzaba en recuperar su misión en medio de un contexto de cambios.Inicialmente, la iglesia de San Pedro, fundada en 1858, parecía no ajustarse a su comunidad adyacente, donde el 40 por ciento de los residentes viven en viviendas municipales y no se gradúan de secundaria. La mayoría de los feligreses de la congregación eran graduados universitarios y venían de otras zonas a trabajar a la ciudad, explicó ella.Luego de un extensivo adiestramiento en el discipulado, encuestas congregacionales y comunitarias y revisiones de la misión de la Iglesia, Washington rediseñó la liturgia dominical para ajustarse a las necesidades de la comunidad.“Si tienes una comunidad donde el 40 por ciento de las personas no han terminado la escuela secundaria, el libro de oración es una piedra de tropiezo”, afirmó ella. “El Himnario de 1982 es una piedra de tropiezo. De manera que contraté a una músico bautista y ella ha sido maravillosa porque toca una música con que la comunidad puede relacionarse”.El folleto del oficio se usa como una herramienta pedagógica y ella adaptó el popular rito eucarístico [U2charist] a una “misa experimental llamada la ‘Misa de la Tierra, el Viento y el Fuego’.  Mi primera idea cuando vi U2charist fue, está bien, pero no va a funcionar aquí”, señaló Washington.“Tenemos una asistencia promedio los domingos de 45 personas. Pero en la Misa de la Tierra, el Viento y el Fuego teníamos más de 125 personas. Tal vez ahora estamos entendiendo algo. Tal vez es una herramienta de evangelización. Sólo sé que el domingo funcionó”.La iglesia invirtió en una página web y en publicidad en los periódicos de la comunidad afroamericana, re-energizó su actividad de extensión comunitaria y deliberadamente se concentró en los ministerios de jóvenes y ancianos. Sin embargo, los recursos limitados hicieron improbable la contratación de un líder de juventud o de un director de educación cristiana; ella espera compartir materiales con otras congregaciones “y no necesariamente iglesias episcopales”, dijo en la reunión.“He pedido que vengan misioneros a la zona deprimida de la ciudad y aprendan de nosotros”, añadió Washington, quien hasta hace poco era la directora ejecutiva del Centro Comunitario de San Pedro y San Pablo. Este centro, fundado por la iglesia, se mudó hace varios años del salón parroquial a un edificio de enfrente recién construido. “Sé que es posible porque muchos de estos mismos individuos trabajan de voluntarios en el centro comunitario dando clases a los niños”.La buena noticia es que la congregación es receptiva al cambio, añadió. “Cuando comenzamos este proceso, esta [consigna] se convirtió en un mantra para nosotros: para crecer tenemos que estar dispuestos a cambiar. También teníamos muy claro que no aspirábamos a que la diócesis nos rescatara, y que eso es importante como congregación”.“Tenemos nuestro propio sentido de independencia, porque durante muchos, muchos años tuvimos este ADN paternalista de que alguien iba ayudarnos o que alguien iba a arreglarnos. Esa actitud nos despojaba de gran parte de nuestra fuerza, y ahora la hemos recuperado”.El obispo Jim Mathes, de San Diego, que le dio la bienvenida al grupo, dijo que la diócesis también está en proceso de relocalizar su sede en la zona de Ocean Beach, donde actualmente ofrece 3.000 contactos de servicio al mes a través de grupos de 12 pasos, comidas, asistencia médica y legal e incluso cortes de pelo.“Hemos establecido una misión y ministerio allí. Ahora vamos a reunir a los que han sido servidos y a encontrarles congregación”, señaló.Contextualmente, la diócesis identificó el foco de su misión como activismo y acción en las áreas de inmigración y problemas fronterizos, pobreza y falta de vivienda y ayuda a los veteranos.Ingresar en la comunidad de una manera nueva es fascinante, apuntó él. “Este sitio me va a cambiar…el liderazgo será transformado por este enfoque misional. Toda la comunidad será transformada”.Evangelización y renovación comunitariaEscuchar las historias personales de fe de otros es uno de los más convincentes testimonios evangélicos de que disponemos; sin embargo, con frecuencia los episcopales ni siquiera contemplan esa opción, dijo el Rdo. Anthony Guillén, misionero de la Iglesia Episcopal a cargo del ministerio latino/hispano.“No nos damos cuenta de los magníficos vendedores que somos”, afirmó. Desde computadoras a películas hasta restaurantes, la gente siempre está hablando acerca de sus opciones preferidas, ofreciendo una especie de charlas promocionales sin siquiera darse cuenta, apuntó.“Vendemos todos los días, al decirle a la gente donde deben ir para conseguir todas las cosas, salvo lo que proclamamos como buenas nuevas”, añadió Guillén, quien espera que la reunión de San Diego ejemplificará “una imagen de lo que será la Iglesia”.“Si tuviera una magnífica comida,  se lo contaría a la gente y le diría dónde encontrarla. Tenemos que empezar por decirle adonde ir para satisfacer el hambre que tenemos en nuestras almas”.Un encuentro con un amable capellán en una escuela anglicana de Hong Kong resultó tan poderosa que 30 de los 33 estudiantes budistas pidieron ser bautizados en la graduación, recordó Mimi Wu, coordinador de la red de Ministerio Asiáticos de la VIII Provincia.Ella fue uno de esos estudiantes. “Yo digo que la evangelización es el amor en acción y yo lo he visto”, dijo Wu, de la diócesis de Hawái. “El capellán nos pastoreó, nos dio mucho amor y comprensión”.Para el Rdo. Canónigo René Barraza, la evangelización vino en la forma de invitaciones persistentes de parte de amigos, que se mantuvieron invitándolo a la iglesia de San Atanasio [St. Athanasius] en Los Ángeles, donde él ahora presta servicios como pastor.“Cuando llegué de México, me sentí fuera de lugar allí. No me gustaba (San Atanasio) en lo más mínimo”, recordaba Barraza, de 69 años. “Era una estructura de madera, pequeña y oscura. Estaba acostumbrado a grandes iglesias catedrales catolicorromanas con vidrieras emplomadas. Ésta me asustó. Decidí no volver. Pero mis amigos siguieron invitándome.“Ahora me alegro de haber vuelto con una actitud receptiva. Me invitaron a leer y luego a servir de acólito y una cosas me llevó a la otra y he estado creciendo en mi fe desde entonces”.El Rdo. Joseph Jerome dijo que la evangelización había significado haberse acercado deliberadamente a los demás en la comunidad de Sunnyside en la diócesis de Long Island, donde él es rector de la iglesia de Todos los Santos [All Saints Church], una congregación mayoritariamente anglosajona.Para ellos esto ha significado ser deliberadamente acogedores y desestimar el dicho popular de que “hay dos lados en Sunnyside, el mío y el otro lado ”, añadió Jerome, que es negro y sirve como presidente de la Comisión Hispana de la diócesis.La evangelización para el Rdo. Edgar Gutiérrez advino en la forma de la cálida acogida que él recibió. “Soy un homosexual que dejó la Iglesia Católica debido a su posición respecto a las mujeres y los homosexuales”, afirmó.El rector de la iglesia de San Lucas, una congregación bilingüe y multiétnica de Boston, dijo que él había sentido “un llamado al sacerdocio desde que era niño”.La reunión ofreció una oportunidad de “recargar”, así como “una sensación de familia, de la manera en que una familia nos alimenta, y una fuente de información e inspiración”.Reconocer el multiculturalismo; la importancia de la interconexiónMarcel Pereira, de 31 años, asistió a la reunión de la diócesis de Curitiba en Brasil y descubrió que “los problemas que ustedes enfrentan en Estados Unidos son muy semejantes a lo que vemos en Brasil.“El mundo multicultural en que vivimos y la manera en que abrazamos la diversidad sin convertirnos en otra cosa son sólo algunos de los problemas”, dijo.“Las soluciones que encontramos respecto a la Nueva Comunidad es una respuesta para todas las otras partes de la Iglesia”, agregó. “Son los mismos problemas del siglo XXI, acoger a todos de manera radical, cambiar la lengua y la cultura. Además de la tecnología. Solíamos estar orientados hacia el libro; ahora estamos orientados hacia la imagen y tenemos que entender el modo de abrazar esta cultura”.Para el Rdo. Brandon Mauai, de 27 años, la interconexión de compartir historias y materiales lo atrajo a la conferencia de San Diego.“Todos tenemos diferentes historias de los sitios de donde venimos que muestran nuestra diversidad. Yo tengo un origen asiático, nativoamericano y polinesio”, afirmó Mauai, que sirve como ministro de la juventud en la Reserva Nativoamericana de Standing Rock en Dakota del Sur. “Mi experiencia es la experiencia filipina en Hawái y ayuda a que compartamos nuestras historias unos con otros y con la Iglesia Episcopal”, afirmó.“Ayuda a cultivar la fe, y la esperanza y el amor tal como lo vivimos a diario y nos ayuda a mostrarlo a los demás, a tener un efecto de onda, especialmente con la juventud de la reserva que necesita desesperadamente esa esperanza”.El obispo Dave Bailey dijo que la conferencia representa otro paso en el camino a través de “la autoconciencia y la autodeterminación” para su diócesis de Navajolandia, así como para otras comunidades con problemas.“Es importante para nosotros en esta reunión asumirnos como la Nueva Comunidad al apoyarnos mutuamente de una manera nueva y vivificante, reconociendo que no tenemos que estar en competencia, sino confirmar lo que tenemos en común al tiempo que apreciamos aquellos que [a cada cual] nos distingue”, dijo.“Creo que esto es un nuevo comienzo para la vida de la Iglesia y de muchas maneras puede ser vivificador para muchas de nuestras diócesis que pueden estar estancadas”.Diane Bruce, la obispa sufragánea de Los Ángeles llamó a la reunión “el nuevo rostro de la Iglesia”. Ella vino “a aprender y a apoyar la conferencia. Esto es sólo el comienzo”, afirmó. “Espero que haya más de estas conferencias y que nos congreguemos con más personas y sus obispos”.Para Bernadette Wyche, de la Iglesia Episcopal Africana de Santo Tomás [St Thomas] en Filadelfia, y Trevor Bryan II de San Lucas [St. Luke’s]en Nueva Orleáns, cuyas congregaciones son compañeras a través de la Iniciativa de Nuevas Visiones del Ministerio de los Negros, esta asamblea fue una reunión de seguimiento.El programa asocia a prósperas congregaciones afroamericanas con iglesias más pequeñas. Bryan dijo que la reunión de San Diego “ofrecía muchísimo.“Siempre que tenemos la oportunidad de asociarnos con comunidades indígenas, asiáticas y latinas/hispanas descubrimos que tenemos muchas experiencias semejantes. Estamos en diferentes etapas de esas experiencias, pero hay mucho que podemos aprender de estos intercambios culturales”.Sarah Eagle Heart, la misionera nativoamericana de la Iglesia Episcopal dijo que la reunión le brindaba a los misioneros una oportunidad de contar sus propias historias porque “a veces la gente realmente no entiende lo que hacen los misioneros étnicos.“Nuestro trabajo cubre toda la gama desde la formación cristiana hasta la promoción social pasando por la preparación teológica”, dijo. Los misioneros han creado vídeos, siguió explicando ella, de manera que la Iglesia, en su más amplia acepción, tenga una idea del abanico de sus responsabilidades y de la importancia del ministerio étnico.Ella espera que la Iglesia “ayudará a recobrar la cultura y el lenguaje porque ambos formaron parte de la Iglesia que los quitó… y que, Dios mediante, ayudará a devolverlos”.Ella describió los talleres como el evento acerca del desarrollo de una comunidad basado en recursos y de programas de recuperación que ella supervisa, y que son “un convincente enfoque para desarrollar un círculo más amplio de personas a la cuales dedicarse… y alcanzar metas mediante el descubrimiento y la movilización de sus recursos ya presentes en esa comunidad”.Los cristianos indígenas tienen mucho que ofrecer, dijo Eagle Heart, que pertenece a la nación oglala lakota. “Nuestro pueblo tiene una multitud de dones y de sabiduría cultural que compartir con otros mientras lleva a cabo su trayectoria espiritual… tener una familia de partidarios que compartan retos comunes  y puedan alentarse mutuamente mientras continúan el proceso de ordenación o la preparación laical es una singular bendición.“Me siento orgulloso de mi equipo de misioneros étnicos que fueron proféticos en echar los cimientos de esta conferencia sobre formación cristiana a lo largo de toda la vida para garantizar que este evento fuese un momento de renovación transformadora.  La bendición de la salvia y el agua por la anciana diácona Reynelda James (Paiute) con las mujeres indígenas fue un momento sagrado de curación para el círculo de parientes reunidos”.Otros de los talleres que se presentaron incluían: misión y promoción; evangelización; jubileo y justicia social; viaducto de la escuela a la prisión, la doctrina del descubrimiento; ministerio de los bautizados; formación medioambiental; tecnología en el ministerio y mayordomía.Longkee Vang, de 24 años, de la iglesia de los Santos Apóstoles [the Holy Apostles], en San Pablo, Minnesota, que tiene la población hmong más grande de la Iglesia Episcopal, dijo que ella se había sentido compelida a asistir a la reunión porque “yo quiero un cambio”.“Vine para mostrar que estoy en disposición de ayudar a producir un cambio, para estar entre las personas que sienten lo mismo que yo, para estar entre las personas influyentes que pueden hacer un cambio significativo en la Iglesia.“Quiero ver que se produce un auténtico cambio, con el que hemos soñado. Esta es una oportunidad de relacionarnos con otros que quieren cambiar también”.— La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service y está radicada en Los Ángeles. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET ‘Nueva reunión comunitaria’ une a los ministerios episcopales étnicos An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more

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first_imgSínodo de la Diócesis de Cuba 7 febrero de 2013, Catedral, La Havana, 8 de la noche Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR center_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Feb 11, 2013 Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA Sínodo de la Diócesis de Cuba7 febrero de 2013Catedral, La Havana, 8 de la nocheLa Rvdma. Katharine Jefferts SchoriObispa Presidente y PrimadoLa Iglesia Episcopal¿Qué comieron hoy?  El arroz y los frijoles, pescado, pollo, tortillas?  ¿Qué más se comieron, o qué anhelaron ustedes comer?  Yo sé que cada vez que este sínodo se reúne allí hay un montón de comida para todos – y también tacitas de café cubano.  Recuerdo muy buenas conversaciones con Juan Antonio en estas cenas.  Ahora creo que él está experimentando la cena celestial.También sé que ha habido mucha preocupación acerca de la comida por aquí, y que no todo el mundo tiene suficiente para comer.  Al mismo tiempo, sé que hay un montón de paladares abriendo para alimentar a la gente que tiene dinero para pagar.  En los EE.UU., y en más y más de países de todo el mundo, las personas se enferman y mueren por comer demasiado.  La obesidad es un problema creciente en China, en México, el Pacífico Sur, Japón y Oriente Medio.  Tiene muchas causas, pero los  principales son la disponibilidad de alimentos baratos, el costo creciente de los alimentos sanos y nutritivos, y el hecho de que muchas personas no hacen ejercicio regular, como resultado de cambios en el tipo de trabajo.  Más y más de nosotros nos sentamos en las mesas y mesas de trabajo en lugar de trabajar en el campo todo el día.  También está el hecho de que algunos de nosotros comemos cuando estamos tratando de llenar nuestro vacío – y no sólo nuestros estómagos.Hay un viejo dicho, “eres lo que comes.”  ¿Nos estamos volviendo lo que deseamos.Esta noche estamos invitados a comer la palabra de Dios, y se saciarán.  Ese dicho sin duda tiene sus raíces en esta imagen bíblica antigua, afirmó más tarde por Jesús.  Los profetas, ambos los primeros y los posteriores, se utilizan con frecuencia.  Deuteronomio dice: “Este mandamiento no es demasiado difícil para ti … No, la palabra está muy cerca de ti, en tu boca y en tu corazón” (Deuteronomio 30:11,14).  Hemos oído decir a la gente Josué a comer el libro de la ley, y se deja fermentar – se supone que deben meditar o rumiar en lo que Dios pide de todas las personas.  El salmista dice: Prueben, y vean que el Señor es bueno. (34:8).Pablo les dice a los romanos que la palabra de Dios se supone que llenar nuestras bocas y corazones – y él está hablando de la ley, la norma o los principios rectores de la relación entre Dios y los seres humanos.  Estamos destinados a cenar con regularidad la Palabra de Dios, y permitir que forman lo que somos, cómo pensamos y cómo actuamos.  En el evangelio de Juan, Jesús es llamado la Palabra de Dios, y nos recuerda que él es el pan que nos llenará de vida eterna.  Cómeme, dice, que la palabra pase sus labios y la lengua, entre en su corazón, y que va a cambiar su propio ser.  Es el camino a la vida abundante – deje que la palabra se llena, en lugar de sustitutos que nunca va a satisfacer.Ese es el fundamento de nuestra teología eucarística – si comemos el pan y bebemos el vino, nos convertimos en lo que comemos.  No podemos alcanzar la perfección que conocemos en Jesús, pero molécula por molécula, y pensamiento por pensamiento, estamos literalmente alimentado e inspirado para convertirnos en la Palabra de Dios en este mundo.  Hay un término teológico técnico para esto, llamado divinización.  Es un reflejo de lo que un teólogo cristiano primitivo dijo: “Dios se hizo humano para que podamos llegar a ser divino” (Atanasio).  Es por eso que nos reunimos así, semana tras semana para ser alimentado.Si queremos llegar a ser más como Jesús, la dieta a seguir es claro – ‘cómeme’, él dice, ‘probar la palabra de Dios, deja que te llene y te apoye.’  Es por eso que estamos aquí esta noche – para ser alimentados con el pan que satisface.  Pero esto no termina con el llenado completa.  El pan de Jesús es para ser compartido.  Él nos invita a compartir el pan con todos los que tienen hambre, tanto físicamente como espiritualmente.  La epidemia de comer en exceso en este mundo tiene mucho que ver con la falta de alimento espiritual.  El profeta Amós sabía algo sobre esto, y él es muy contundente, “escuchar esta palabra de Dios, ustedes – sobrealimentado vacas, que pisan los necesitados y pedir a sus maridos para más cócteles … Yo les he enviado el hambre, los dientes limpios y estómagos vacíos, pero no prestaban atención … vuelve a mí, odien el mal y amen el bien, y hagan justicia en sus ciudades … “(Amós 4-7).     La palabra viva es la respuesta a ese tipo de hambre, con sus raíces en la injusticia.  La palabra viva es también la respuesta a la clase de hambre espiritual que lleva a las personas a comer de todo y nada, salvo la palabra de Dios de la justicia.   Ese consumo voraz nace del hambre que tiene su origen en una deficiencia dietética de la vitamina justicia – ‘ que se dice, ‘conocer a Dios.’El mundo que nos rodea está muriendo de hambre, por ambas razones – la falta de pan de la tierra y la falta de conciencia de la necesidad de nuestros vecinos.  Se nos ha dado noticias inmensamente buenas acerca de cómo responder a esa hambre.Cuando fuimos bautizados, nos comprometimos a proclamar las buenas nuevas de Dios en Cristo por la palabra y el ejemplo.  Como palabra de Dios y el pan del mundo, en realidad significa que nos dan evidencia de lo que comemos y lo que nos estamos convirtiendo – hablamos y compartimos esa palabra-pan con el mundo.  Nos convertimos en socios en la transformación del mundo hambriento.  Hemos venido aquí para ser alimentado, con la palabra y con el pan.Una colecta que oramos casi al final del año de la iglesia habla del hambre cósmica para la venida del Señor:Bendito Señor, que hizo que inspiraste las Sagradas Escrituras para nuestra enseñanza: Concédenos que para escuchar, leer, marcar, aprender, e interiormente las asimilemos, que podamos abrazar y siempre mantener la esperanza bendita de la vida eterna, que te nos has dado en nuestro Salvador Jesucristo, que vive y reina contigo y el Espíritu Santo, un solo Dios, por los siglos de los siglos.Vengan a comer, se llenen, digieran lo que han recibido, y dejan que se cambia, una celda a la vez, una persona y una relación a la vez.  Vengan a ser alimentados, y luego ayudarles a alimentar el hambre del mundo con la justicia de la palabra de Dios. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more

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first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis By Carol E. BarnwellPosted Jun 1, 2015 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Archdeacon finds neighbor helping neighbor in Houston Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Bags of garbage line the street for blocks and blocks around Braes Bayou in Southwest Houston. Photo/Carol E. Barnwell[Episcopal Diocese of Texas] “I saw a lot of people with a light in their eyes,” said the Very Rev. Russ Oechsel, archdeacon for the Diocese of Texas. “They know God is with us all the time.”Oechsel led an emergency spiritual care team from the Diocese of Texas through the streets of the Meyerland area in Southwest Houston, an area especially hard hit by recent flooding. Their purpose was to show up to listen to the stories of those affected by the flooding during the past week. In addition, they carried coolers filled with water bottles and Home Depot gift cards. They heard many stories and were struck by the number of Houstonians out helping their neighbors as flooded homes were cleaned out.“We saw off -duty police officers, firemen and military personnel helping people clear out wet carpet and sheetrock. There was one group who showed up with food,” Oechsel said. “They set up under a big tent serving lasagna to anyone who came.”In the Westbury neighborhood, they met Stephanie, the leader of the Westbury Civic Club. Stephanie was under a blue tent recording the needs of the various homeowners and at the same time sending out volunteers to help those homeowners address their needs.“Stephanie was doing this on an ad hoc basis with no particular training, but with the heart of a leader and the compassion of our Savior,” Oechsel said. “It was a powerful example of people caring for each other.”The team met a young minister and his wife who were renting their home, now flooded. The couple has a young son, 18 months old, and they are expecting another boy soon. The owner of the house had come to remove carpeting and friends were helping them move their furniture and items that were not ruined into storage. Their church has found temporary housing for them.Oechsel said they met a single woman who had insurance, but it would not cover temporary housing. She’d begun cleaning out the house, but still needs help. The team left contact information and plans to follow up with emergency funds early next week.“We met a wonderful man named Drew,” Oechsel said. “He lost his father early in his life, but was raised in the neighborhood. He takes care of his elderly neighbors, mowing their grass and watching out for them. He asked us to go and see Mrs. Hamilton. He said he knew she needed to talk. We walked down the street and knocked on her door and were greeted by a lovely older woman. She cares for her husband who has Alzheimer’s and is bed bound. He is in hospice and she pays for a caregiver during the day and at night,” he said. “Mrs. Hamilton’s son came to help clean out so she can save her energy to care for her husband. She was very grateful for our visit promised she would call when she was ready for help.”“We have some funds,” he said, “and I handed out a lot of cards with my phone number. Mostly, we spent the day listening to peoples’ experiences,” he added.“I spoke to the former senior warden at Ascension Episcopal Church,” Oechsel said. “He and his brother were helping their father who is in his 80s and has Alzheimer’s.” The man has lived in his home for nearly 60 years and it was completely flooded.“It’s important that we are present,” Oechsel said. “Our spiritual care team is there to listen to people, to pray with them, assess their needs, offer gift cards, water and chat.”Oechsel plans to travel to Wimberley soon to work with the Diocese of West Texas and others to plan strategic long term response to the devastation. Episcopal Relief & Development has already granted $15,000 for emergency relief for which Oechsel is very grateful. The Diocese of Texas also sent a donation to the Diocese of West Texas in relief aid for Central Texas and in Acuna, Mexico on the border with the Diocese of West Texas where a tornado killed 17 people over the weekend.“We’ll sit down with the diocesan staff in West Texas to map out our resources for long term recovery once the first wave of cleanup has taken place,” he said. Most of the homes destroyed in Wimberley were likely to be insured. That is not the case to the south in San Marcos. “If we begin a major rebuilding effort, it may focus on the San Marcos area, but we will know more in a few weeks,” he said.West Texas Bishop Gary Lillibridge last week wrote to his diocese about those disasters.The Diocese of Texas had several churches report minor damage, but no major flooding, although many parishioners are facing major rebuilding once the storms are past. Many cars were flooded as well.The Rev. Gena Davis, right, had just put her house on the market when it was flooded. She and husband Gary have spent the past week throwing most of their soaked library onto the curb and taking clothes to the dry cleaners with lots of help from parishioners. “Well, it’s a heck-of-a way to downsize!” she said. Photo/Carol E. BarnwellThe Rev. Gena Davis, rector of Grace Episcopal Church, Houston, had more than two feet of water in her home and lost two cars. Much of her extensive library was lost to water damage, although she was able to find her treasured icons in time to dry them off and save them from permanent damage.Her husband Gary worked for three years overseeing the rebuilding efforts in Galveston following Hurricane Ike and now finds it strange to be on the receiving end of the flooding. “I remember comforting people who were very upset at having lost everything,” he said. “I still can’t take this all in,” he added, looking around at the piles of furniture and household items hauled to the curb from their home.Davis said she ignored the numerous alerts from her cell phone the night of the flood and it wasn’t until she realized the car’s alarm was going off that she got out of bed to check. It was then she stepped into several inches of water, “that just continued to rise.”Texas hopes for a drying out period in the coming days and many consider that the drought the state has suffered for the past several years might not look so bad.Donations are being accepted for flood victims at the Diocese of Texas. Make checks payable to The Episcopal Diocese of Texas, marked “flood relief,” and mail to: 1225 Texas St., Houston, TX 77002.Online donations are being accepted by the Diocese of West Texas. Go to dwtx.org/departments/world-mission and click “donate.” Apply your gift to “commission of emergency response” or contact Kaitlin Reed at 888.210.824.5387 or email her at [email protected] with further questions.— Carol E. Barnwell is the director of communications for the Diocese of Texas. Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

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first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ledlie and Sarah, a social worker, will move to Washington this summer. He will officially begin his duties at St. Columba’s on Sept. 13, 2015. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel St. Columba’s calls Ledlie I. Laughlin as new rector Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA The Rev. Ledlie Laughlin is currently the rector of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in downtown Philadelphia, where he has served since 1999. He graduated from Oberlin College and attended Berkeley/Yale Divinity School, where he received his M.Div. in 1987. For 25 years, he has served in urban parishes up and down the East Coast. An active leader in the Diocese of Pennsylvania during his tenure at St. Peter’s, Ledlie chaired the Standing Committee during a difficult time of transition, restoring trust in Diocesan leadership. He has also played an instrumental role in the creation of P.O.W.E.R. (Philadelphians Organized to Witness, Empower and Rebuild).“From everything I know and have experienced of St. Columba’s, both past and present, I sense an overwhelming extraordinary potential; I sense that it is a community eager to serve the world as children of God and disciples of Christ,” responded the Rev. Laughlin. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events About St. Columba’s“Open in spirit, deep in faith, rich in worship and active in service”Today St. Columba’s is the largest parish in the Episcopal Diocese of Washington. Established in 1874, and moved into a small white frame chapel in Tenleytown in 1875, we have grown to become a congregation of over 3,000 members. For over 140 years, we have been an inclusive community filled with a deep sense of worship and a great appreciation of music and liturgy, committed to Christian formation, nurturing of minds of children and adults alike, and serving our neighbors. Find more information on our ministries @Columba.org. Join our conversation on Facebook by “liking” our page. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [St. Columba’s Episcopal Church] The vestry of St. Columba’s Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C., is pleased to announce the calling of the Rev. Ledlie I. Laughlin as its new rector.“Ledlie’s work has demonstrated a love of children, an appreciation of the importance of great music to liturgy, a commitment to thoughtful, well-crafted preaching and a vision of the church as the body of Christ committed to serving others. We look forward to beginning a journey together,” said wardens Lane Heard and Elizabeth Taylor. Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA People Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Posted Jun 15, 2015 The Rt. Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde added, “I am thrilled to join St. Columba’s in welcoming Ledlie Laughlin and his wife, Sarah to the Diocese of Washington. Ledlie brings deep faith, a wide range of ministry experience and skills and a passion for The Episcopal Church. His ministry will enrich us all. It has been a privilege for me to walk alongside and pray with St. Columba’s leadership in this season of discernment. They have served God and their congregation well.” New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

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first_img Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Una delegación episcopal en representación del obispo primado Michael Curry en la conferencia de Naciones Unidas sobre el clima en Marrakech, Marruecos, dirige a un grupo en una meditación sobre el valor. Foto de Sheila Andrus.[Episcopal News Service] En diciembre del año pasado, los gobiernos y funcionarios del mundo se reunieron en Francia para llegar un acuerdo histórico para reducir las emisiones de carbono y frenar el calentamiento global. A principios de esta semana, se reunieron de nuevo, esta vez Marrakech, Marruecos, para proseguir su labor.“La COP21 en París fue para alcanzar un acuerdo; la COP22 se propone la acción necesaria para profundizarlo y fortalecerlo”, dijo el obispo de California Marc Andrus en un email a Episcopal News Service desde la conferencia.Andrus representó al obispo primado Michael Curry en la “Conferencia de las Partes” de Naciones Unidas (COP por su sigla en inglés) que sesionó en París el año pasado. La delegación de este año a la conferencia de 12 días de duración también incluye a Lynnaia Main, funcionaria de Asociaciones Globales de la Iglesia Episcopal y su enlace con las Naciones Unidas, y a Jayce Hafner, analista de política nacional para la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales de la Iglesia Episcopal con sede en Washington, D.C., así como a otras personas de las diócesis de California y Washington, Distrito de Columbia.“Como una ONG presente en 17 países y conocida en el contexto de la ONU como independiente del gobierno de cualquier país en particular, la Iglesia Episcopal está en condiciones de continuar su ministerio y sus medidas de justicia climática a escala global”, dijo Main, en un email a ENS desde Marrakech.La elección de Donald J. Trump como el próximo presidente de Estados Unidos, ensombrece la conferencia en Marrakech, ya que él ha prometido retirar a EE.UU. del Acuerdo de París y frenar el compromiso del país de reducir su dependencia de los combustibles fósiles. El presidente electo ha dicho que el cambio climático causado por el hombre es un “fraude”.El Acuerdo de París llamaba a los países del mundo a limitar las emisiones de carbono, lo cual exigirá un decremento en la dependencia de los combustibles fósiles a favor de fuentes de energía renovables; y para los países desarrollados, responsables de la mayoría de las emisiones tanto históricamente como en la actualidad, comprometerse con una ayuda anual de $100.000 millones para los países en desarrollo para 2020.Mientras seguía atentamente lo que ocurría en Estados Unidos, el equipo episcopal trabajaba para entablar relaciones con delegaciones que representan a América Latina, el Caribe, Así y el Pacífico, y Europa, lugares donde la Iglesia tiene una presencia, dijo Main.Este año, los delegados de la Iglesia Episcopal estarán presentes en la “zona azul”, o el salón donde tienen lugar las negociaciones, así como también en la “zona verde”, donde los ambientalistas, los activistas del clima, los representantes de empresas sin fines de lucro y las organizaciones no gubernamentales entre otras se reúnen para hacer presentaciones y manifestaciones. Al igual que en la conferencia del año pasado, la delegación episcopal está dirigiendo diariamente oraciones, cánticos y meditaciones en la plaza pública de la zona verde. Las tarjetas de oración temáticas se centran en el valor, la honestidad, la tristeza y el inter-ser [interbeing].“Nuestros cuerpos religiosos han hecho prolongados esfuerzos en [el terreno de] las medidas climáticas, y estos continuarán a la luz de la elección presidencial de Estados Unidos”, dijo Andrus durante la rueda de prensa del 10 de noviembre organizada por la Red de Acción Climática de EE.UU.La semana pasada, Andrus participó con más de 540 clérigos y líderes laicos de un día de solidaridad y testimonio con la nación sioux de Roca Enhiesta [Standing Rock] cerca de Cannon Ball, Dakota del Norte.“En Dakota del Norte”, continuó diciendo él durante la rueda de prensa, “yo y más de 540 clérigos ordenados y miles de laicos nos sumamos a los protectores lakotas del agua en oposición al Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas, un testimonio de fe y acción al que nuestro Obispo Primado ha llamado ‘la nueva Selma’.“La ‘Selma’ a la cual el obispo primado Curry se refiere fue un momento significativo en el movimiento de los Derechos Civiles de EE.UU. en los años 60, cuando personas de muchas religiones junto con personas de la sociedad civil, marcharon a través del puente en Selma, Alabama, y se dirigieron a la capital del estado para protestar de las violaciones de las libertades y de la vida misma de los afroamericanos”, dijo Andrus.Curry al llamar una nueva Selma a la oposición que encabezan los nativoamericanos contra el Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas “enfatiza que los crecientes impactos medioambientales relacionados con el uso de los recursos naturales y el cambio climático son asuntos de ecojusticia en los cuales el bienestar de todos en la red de la vida… está profundamente conectado”, afirmó Andrus.La delegación episcopal, trabajando al mismo tiempo en la zona azul como en la verde, se coordina para estar al tanto de la labor y las negociaciones que tienen lugar en la conferencia. La labor de las negociaciones sigue cuatro cursos: pérdida y daños, adaptación, finanzas y aspiración, explicó Andrus en un correo electrónico.La delegación episcopal utiliza las resoluciones relativas al clima aprobadas por la Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal como los fundamentos de su quehacer de defensa [del medioambiente]. El equipo continúa el trabajo comenzado en París de crear una sólida red de organizaciones nacionales dedicadas a las medidas [de control y protección] climáticas, dijo Andrus.“En la COP21 encontramos que la plataforma política que llevamos con nosotros estaba en sintonía con las mejores aspiraciones que surgieron en el Acuerdo de París, específicamente impedir que el calentamiento global sobrepase el estándar histórico de 1,5 grados Celsius”, dijo también Andrus. “De manera que la Iglesia Episcopal ha hecho y sigue haciendo contribuciones en [el terreno de la] defensa social que promueven las mejores aspiraciones de la comunidad humana en torno al cambio climático”.— Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Por Lynette WilsonPosted Nov 14, 2016 Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN La delegación episcopal en Marrakech parte del acuerdo del clima de 2015 Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

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