May 15, 2021
  • 5:47 pm Data file: Redundancy and collective consultation
  • 5:47 pm How a tribunal tests for harm
  • 5:45 pm IT helps HR lay foundation for other functions
  • 5:43 pm Powercut
  • 5:39 pm Learning to think outside the books

first_imgStudents will show off their best moves this weekend as the Saint Mary’s Program in Dance will offer three performances of its annual dance production, “HappensDance,” featuring the 2010-11 Dance Ensemble Workshop. The performances are put together by Saint Mary’s students, faculty and guest choreographers Beth LaBaren and Lena Polzonetti. Happensdance will be the premiere of Polzonetti’s work inspired by the late Italian author and journalist Italo Calvino, according to a College press release. HappensDance will showcase a wide variety of dance styles, including ballet, modern dance, tap dance and a kick-line performance to an arrangement of Beatles songs, according to a copy of the performance program. Dance professor and Happensdance artistic director Indi Dieckgrafe said the name of the show derives from the diverse choreography and performances featured in the production. “‘HappensDance’ refers to a concert of repertory pieces that are independent of one another and are representative of several choreographers’ creative ideas and inspirations,” she said. Dieckgrafe said HappensDance displays the commitment of an entire technical crew composed of Saint Mary’s students, in addition to the 16 students performing. “The dancers’ dedication to arts in education demands hours and hours of strenuous work. It is exciting to witness this caliber of students as they discover their artistic voices,” she said. Senior Katie Brown said she is excited to perform in the production “I am thrilled the Saint Mary’s dance department has an annual concert for students to participate in,” she said. “It’s a great way for the dancers and choreographers to express their creativity and passion for dance and to share it with the community.” Dieckgrafe said dance enthusiasts of all knowledge and experience levels can appreciate the program. “HappensDance offers a delightful sampling of dance to even the most timid of audiences,” she said.last_img read more

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first_imgCampus Girl Scouts of Notre Dame and St. Mary’s received the 2011-2012 Community Recognition Award from the Northern Indiana-Michiana Service Unit last week for its service to the local area. Sophomore Jamie Pfaff, former club president, said Campus Girl Scouts filled a community need by leading Troop 00087, which served girls on the west side of South Bend who could not be placed in other troops due to lack of leadership. “They probably wouldn’t have been able to be in Girl Scouts without us,” she said.   Pfaff said club members led the troop of approximately 25 girls from 2 to 3:30 p.m. twice a month in Pasquerilla West Hall. People often think Campus Girl Scouts is a club for college-aged Girl Scouts, Pfaff said, but members are actually volunteers within a service group that works with the local Girl Scout council. Past involvement in Girl Scouts is not necessary to join, and men are encouraged to participate as well, Pfaff said. She said Campus Girl Scouts is a convenient way for Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students to connect with and serve girls in the community. “If you’re doing community service, you’re being a Girl Scout,” Pfaff said. According to the Girl Scouts of the USA website, Campus Girl Scouts organizations areis present nation-wide on college campuses. The service clubs are certified by Girl Scouts of the USA but are separate entities that exist to collaborate with Girl Scout councils. In her nomination letter for the award, Service Unit 206 Manager and Campus Girl Scouts Liaison Dawn Cole said Troop 00087 is unique because it is a multi-age troop. It allows for siblings to attend the same meeting, but they are split into groups, called Daisies, Brownies and Juniors, based on their grades. “The idea of this troop is that it’s a one-stop shop for the parents,” Pfaff said. “It makes them more willing to keep their girls in Girl Scouts because they only have to bring them to one meeting.” Pfaff said typically, eight volunteers led each meeting. The girls worked to earn badges and promote the Girl Scout Law, which focuses on values like honesty, responsibility, courage and respect, she said. They also participated in cultural and academic activities like taking a trip to the Snite Museum of Art and participating in Thinking Day. Sophomore Celine Fausto, who co-led the Juniors, said she enjoyed helping her group earn patches in subjects ranging from nature to first aid and emergency response. “It was fun to see what they do because I was a Daisy and Brownie but never reached the Girl Scout [Junior] level, so I never got to do them,” Fausto said. “It was a good leadership experience, and a lot of the little girls were so cute.” In February, Campus Girl Scouts and Troop 00087 sold more than 350 boxes of Girl Scout cookies and spent the profit on Build-A-Bear teddy bears, Fausto said. “I liked it when we sold cookies,” Fausto said. “It was more fun because the girls had more interaction. They got to see the campus and the students and do something active.” Pfaff said Saint Mary’s freshman Kaitlin Maierhofer and Notre Dame freshman Emma O’Shea will head the club as co-presidents next year. She said the club plans to continue leading Troop 00087 and expand by hosting larger events for local troops, like a sleepover or leadership day.   “A goal of Girl Scouts is to get girls thinking in a more futuristic way,” Pfaff said. “These girls are coming to Notre Dame and meeting girls that did that. It’s huge for them to start thinking about their futures.” Campus Girl Scouts works to give the girls in its troop a community in which they can be themselves, Pfaff said. “A big thing for me was to see these girls who were perfect strangers and had probably never been to Notre Dame before become comfortable with each other and become like a little family,” she said.last_img read more

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first_imgIn honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, members of the Saint Mary’s community gathered together to host a panel remembering Dr. King’s message of fostering an inclusive community titled “First Generation College Students.” “We are doing this in honor of Dr. King and his message to include everybody,” Tamara Taylor, assistant director of Student Involvement and Multicultural Affairs, said. “I am a first-generation college student and during my time in school I often felt excluded and forgotten. It is important to recognize the different struggles individuals are going through on campus.” In addition to Taylor, the panel also included other faculty members, all of who consider themselves first-generation college students.   Topics varied from financial aid and parental support to mentorship advice and campus involvement, but each panelist offered her own experience. “My father eventually went to college after he served in World War II and had access to the GI Bill,” Jan Pilarski, a professor in the Justice Education Program, said. “His college experience was not typical and he could not offer me much advice in terms of my education. He pushed for me to be a doctor and it became a struggle for both me and him when I decided to step off that path.” This theme of dealing with friends and family after starting the college experience was expressed by more than one panelist. Bettina Spencer, a professor from the psychology department, also alluded to how different her home in Detroit felt after she started her undergraduate degree at a small liberal arts college in New York. “It was a struggle,” Spencer said. “In fact, it still is a struggle. I went to college and sometimes felt as though I didn’t fit in there, and then I would come home and realize I no longer fully fit in there either. I had to redo my boundaries with certain family members.” Being a first-generation college student is hard enough, but Stacy Davis, a professor in the religious studies and gender and women’s studies departments, said being a scholarship student added to the difficulties. “It is a very scary thing to be a scholarship student at a school with a lot of money,” Davis said. “Academics at the college level are a whole different world. I was the only non-white student out of 60 students in the honors program and everyday was a challenge. It was not until my junior year that I met non-middle class students and truly felt as though I found my people and niche.” All four panelists agreed that the first two years of their college experiences were the most difficult because they did not find a community to which they belonged. “I had a very different experience in the fact that I became a teen mom and then decided to attend college,” Taylor said. “I struggled with the workload and loans. It was not until I became a McNair Scholar at Central Michigan University my junior year that I felt mentored and included in the campus community.” This idea of mentorship and involvement were the two key points each panelist pinpointed as a turning point in their college careers. “I had two very good mentors,” Davis said. “They both taught me that if you are not having fun then the major isn’t right for you.” Each panelist attributed her time as being a first-generation college student to a unique perspective she can now bring to the table in her job.  “After a difficult moment in one of my classes during my undergrad, I had to ask myself the question, ‘Is this threat or a challenge?’ I decided it was a challenge and from then on when I come across difficult situations I ask myself the same question,” Spencer said. The panelists agreed it was these difficult moments of overcoming hardships that led them to appreciate their undergraduate degree. “My advice to offer you is to circle the graduation date,” Davis said. “Keep that date right in front of your face. Once you cross that finish line it is well worth it. Out of all the degrees hanging on my wall I am most proud of my undergraduate one.”last_img read more

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first_imgROME, Italy – This Easter, over 100 Notre Dame students studying in various locations throughout Europe went on pilgrimage to Rome for a weekend of sightseeing, prayer and reflection organized by Campus Ministry. Fr. John Paul Lichon, the Campus Ministry leader of the trip, met the pilgrims in Saint Peter’s Square on Saturday afternoon to distribute tickets for the Easter Sunday Mass. Students from programs all over Europe – including Greece, Spain, England, Ireland, and Italy – reunited by the obelisk in the middle of the piazza, hugging, laughing and sharing stories from their travels. The pilgrimage is an annual event coordinated by Campus Ministry, which includes tours of Rome’s churches, admittance to the Easter Sunday Mass led by Pope Francis, and the opportunity to reflect in the presence of Rome’s most precious relics, Lichon said. Easter is the most important feast of the year for the Church, but the pilgrimage will take on special significance this year, Lichon said. . “We’ve been doing the pilgrimage for a long time, but it just turned out this year it was with the new pope, so that has been exciting,” Lichon said. “The main focus is truly to be on pilgrimage for Easter, to truly enter into Triduum.” Lichon said Campus Ministry offered two pilgrimage “tracks.” The full track includes three days of sightseeing and guided reflection, while the Easter Sunday track admits students only for the Mass in Saint Peter’s Square, Lichon said. “It’s been fantastic. There’re about 40 students doing the full track with us, and we did the whole Triduum service together. We did a bunch of churches together on Friday, we did Saint Peter’s [Saturday] morning and we’re going to do the Vatican Museum,” he said. “Then about 110 students are coming just for the Easter Sunday Mass.” Though the tours and photo opportunities excite the participants, Lichon said the goal of the pilgrimage was to engage in prayer. “Rome at this time is just crazy, and we wanted to create a space that was prayerful and reflective and truly enter into Triduum,” he said. “I think that’s what this week is really about.” Junior Caity Bobber, who is currently studying abroad in London, participated in all of the pilgrimage’s planned events. “We began [Friday] with morning prayer at the Coliseum, and we saw the Basilica of Saint John Lateran, where the skulls of Saints Peter and Paul are,” Bobber said. “It’s actually where the bishop of Rome is, so that’s the cathedral of Rome.” Each day of the pilgrimage is scheduled from 7:00 a.m. until late at night, while some days stretch past midnight, Bobber said. “Last night, the Stations of the Cross began at 9:15 p.m., but we met at 6:45 p.m. to wait for our spot,” Bobber said. “It was a jam-packed day.” Mary Coghlin, a junior studying abroad in London, said visiting the Holy Stairs held special religious significance for her. “I would say we were all surprised by that,” Coghlin said. “It’s 28 stairs taken from the office of Pontius Pilate, so when Jesus was walking to his condemnation, he was walking down those stairs.” Coghlin said Saint Helen, Constantine’s mother, moved the stairs and other elements of Christ’s crucifixion back to Rome. “It’s the original marble, and now they’re covered in another wood, and pilgrims go up each of these 28 steps on their knees while praying. It’s about a 25 minute ordeal,” she said. “It’s way more moving than you would expect. People did specific prayers, acts of contrition. Some people received indulgences.” The students also attended the Via Crucis, the Way of the Cross ceremony, held at the Coliseum on Friday night, Coghlin said. “It was candlelit and we were close to Papa Francesco and it was beautiful,” Coughlin said. “[In the ceremony] there was Italian and a lot of Latin, which was nice because you were able to say the Our Father in that. There were also a lot of Notre Dame people there, and it was a great day.” The group’s intense touring schedule didn’t leave the pilgrims much free time, but Lichon said the group purposefully walked a fine line between seeing Rome as tourists and visiting the churches as worshippers. “You visit the churches for a purpose, you don’t just walk in and take a picture,” he said. “You [try to] understand what this church brings to you in a special way. You ask, how is God trying to speak to you through this place?” Contact Meghan Thomassen at [email protected]last_img read more

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first_imgAt Wednesday night’s student Senate meeting, the members discussed the core curriculum review with guest speaker Dean John McGreevy of the College of Arts and Letters and voted on the nomination of Janie Goodson, a junior mathematics major, to take over the role of Student Union Treasurer starting Sunday.Student body vice president Matthew Devine opened the meeting and introduced McGreevy, who gave a brief overview of the core curriculum and said the theology requirement would not be eliminated.“I’ve heard a lot about [rumors of the theology requirements’ elimination] recently, and we didn’t anticipate that,” he said. “Everyone knows that theology is central to whatever is going to happen at Notre Dame.” He said the core curriculum review committee wanted student feedback to help them make their decisions and invited senators to bring up their own concerns.“The committee is charged with overseeing a faculty-led, campus-wide — that includes students — review of current general education requirements and deliberate possible changes in the curriculum,” he saidThe University reviews the core curriculum every 10 years. In the past 46 years since the core curriculum was designed, there have been almost no changes.McGreevy said two major concerns he had heard from students were that First Year of Studies was too similar to the high school course lineup and that there was a lack of cohesion among first-year classes.“We hear complaints about what students refer to as ‘grade 13,’” he said. “They sometimes feel the first year at Notre Dame is too much a repetition of what they did in high school.”Most of the concerns of the Senate focused on the lack of electives for many majors, the lack of interest and choice in the required classes and the number of credits required by the core curriculum.Students can voice their opinions regarding the core curriculum at curriculumreview.nd.edu. There will be a student survey and two meetings with students, one with the academic commissioners within the dorms as well as one with students chosen by their departments.After the presentation and discussion about the core curriculum, the Senate voted on the nomination by senior Kristen Parkinson, current Student Union Treasurer, of Janie Goodson to take over the position beginning Sunday and extending for a period of one year. Parkinson presented her nomination and said Goodson would be an excellent choice.“Janie is an extremely talented and motivated individual with the passion, drive and commitment to successfully serve the student body,” Parkinson said.The Senate approved Goodson’s nomination.Student body president Lauren Vidal also announced one dining hall will be open for brunch and dinner each day over spring break.Tags: Core Curriculum, curriculum review, Dining Halls, Notre Dame, Senate, Student Union, Theologylast_img read more

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first_imgEditor’s Note: This is the second story in a two-part series examining the ways Native language and cultural identity are being kept alive by the students of Notre Dame.For many Notre Dame students, the city of South Bend is simply known as the area surrounding the University. But, the general region of South Bend is also known as Zenba Odan — or “Ribbon Town” — to the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi. This past spring, a land acknowledgment resolution was passed by the student senate, largely prompted by the Native American Students Association of Notre Dame (NASAND), yet the University still does not formally acknowledge the tribe’s major role in Notre Dame’s founding. The land acknowledgment resolution was proposed to be read at all major Notre Dame events in order to recognize the Potawatomi land the University sits on. Marcus Winchester, the director of the language and culture department of the Pokagon Band, said many people who are affiliated with the University do not realize that the Potawatomi invited Fr. Stephen Badin to the area that is now Notre Dame. “I think it would be a huge milestone if the University would acknowledge that we’re the ones that welcomed Fr. Badin and requested his presence,” Winchester said. “And then when Fr. Badin left, Fr. Sorin was the one who came in and replaced him. So you know, that institution wouldn’t be there if Leopold [Pokagon] had requested someone else.”The Pokagon Natives have been in this area longer than Notre Dame itself, and have a history in the area dating back to the 1830s, years before Notre Dame was initially settled.Blaire Topash-Caldwell, an archivist for the Pokagon Band, said in an email that the 1830s were a stressful time for tribes in the Great Lakes region. “Many villages were cut off from trade, left out of major policy decisions and forcibly removed from their home lands to foreign environments [in the] West,” Topash-Caldwell said. “Many native people died en route or starved once they reached their reservations. During this time, Leopold Pokagon was very politically active in treaty negotiations and forging important political relationships in order to protect his people.”In July of 1830, Leopold Pokagon journeyed from southeast Michigan to Detroit to ask Fr. Gabriel Richard to send a Catholic priest to oversee the failing Carey Mission in Niles, Michigan. But, Issac McCoy, the pastor of the failing mission, refused to allow Leopold and newcomer Badin to succeed the Mission in Niles. So, they decided to start a brand new mission in one of Leopold’s villages — this village was in present-day South Bend.A year later, Badin built a chapel and the mission was thriving, Topash-Caldwell said. “In 1834, Fr. Badin donated over 500 acres of this land to the Diocese of Vincennes, and in 1842 this land was given to Fr. Badin’s successor under a condition that a college would be built there. That successor was Fr. Sorin and that college is Notre Dame,” he said. Winchester said Native Americans in the area often tried to negotiate with Americans instead of fighting or resisting. This approach would eventually lead to the creation of Notre Dame.“The United States wanted Potawatomi land, and they would go into these treaties with our leaders,” Winchester said. “What our leaders did, rather than try to fight or resist the Americans, was decide that we would try to have influence over American expansion rather than resist it. So, one of the ways that they did that was in treaty negotiations with the United States government. They would request things like log cabins, livestock and they also requested a missionary.” This missionary became the failed mission in Niles that ultimately led to the creation of a brand new mission in South Bend. However, the Treaty of Chicago in 1833 by the U.S. government aimed to give the Pokagon’s land away to Americans. “When Leopold went to the Treaty of Chicago in 1833, he discovered that treaty was intended to sign away the last of the Potawatomi land in Michigan and Indiana,” Winchester said. “Leopold used the successful mission that he had established with Fr. Badin as a justification for why our group of Potawatomi shouldn’t be moved out west. The United States government agreed that it was a very successful mission, and there was no need for us to be removed. Fr. Badin left, and had a few replacements come in, but his long-term replacement was Fr. Sorin.”From then on, Winchester said Notre Dame and the Pokagon maintained fairly good relations — that is, until the 1990s.“There’s always been a pretty respectful relationship between the tribe and Notre Dame,” Winchester said. “A long time ago, anytime any of our families needed anything, we could go to the school and they would help us out — whether it was food or clothing, or whatever it might have been. … I think relationships kind of went sour in the ’90s because there were some Potawatomi particular — that Hannahville Potawatomi from up North and Upper Peninsula, Michigan — tried to bring a lawsuit against the institution about land claims, so that kind of soured things.”As for the present day, Notre Dame professors will often host Potawatomi leaders in order to ensure students become more educated on the tribe’s history in the area. However, aside from this and the land acknowledgment, Native American students don’t have many resources or support on campus, Marcus Winchester-Jones, a Pokagon student and the current treasurer of NASAND, said. Winchester-Jones was the president of NASAND for the 2018-2019 school year, and the group, made up of many of the Native students on campus, has advocated for the removal of the Columbus murals, a land acknowledgment, a Native Studies major and even more resources for Native students.“I would like to see more support, and maybe some native traditions on campus,” Winchester-Jones, a junior and the cousin of Marcus Winchester, said. “I know, back in the day, there was a powwow celebration that they did on campus. We could start to bring that back with the help of administration. I think that it would be huge, just because this was native land back in the day. … It could be better to help develop and strengthen those bonds.”In an effort to maintain the use of the native language of the Potawatomi people, Neshnabémowen, the Tribal Historic Preservation Office employs fluent speakers that have launched an online dictionary. The tribe also has several initiatives in place to keep the culture and language alive. “We also have a Cultural Activities Coordinator who’s organizing regalia-making classes, sugar bush camp and several other programs,” Topah-Caldwell said. “We have two team members who work with youth — everything from after-school programs, culture camp, and mentoring the Youth Council.”Although the tribe is based in Dowagiac, Michigan — about 45 minutes north of Notre Dame — the presence of the tribe can be seen in South Bend, from the street names and businesses to the Four Winds field. “Obviously, we have the casino on the southwest side of town, and we also have the Four Winds Fields. But that doesn’t belong to us, you pretty much pay to have your name on that with a contract,” Winchester said.Winchester-Jones said he would also like to see more Native Americans on campus, but it is difficult to persuade native communities to send their children to Notre Dame. “I would like to see more natives on campus,” he said. “It’s tough to get people to come to where there’s not a lot of people like them. But if there’s more effort shown and more effort communicated to those that are already on campus that they’re trying, that would be very, very nice to hear. Because I don’t hear much of it.”Tags: Father Badin, Father Sorin, land acknowledgment, Leopold Pokagon, NASAND, Pokagon Potawatomilast_img read more

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first_imgOn March 11, University President Fr. John Jenkins broke the news that the Notre Dame community would not be returning to the classroom after spring break — at least, not for a very long time. In a campus-wide email, Jenkins announced campus would close March 17 and conduct classes online as a precautionary measure against the coronavirus outbreak. From all corners of the world, students — many without textbooks and equipped with only a week’s worth of clothes — wondered what this transition would mean for them. Less than an hour later, vice president for student affairs Erin Hoffmann Harding sent an email to students outlining more details about Notre Dame’s closure and how the University would help them navigate it. Hall rectors were tasked with relaying the specifics of move-out, however. According to emails obtained by The Observer, the majority reached out to their residents within hours of Hoffmann Harding’s March 11 email.Their messages followed near-identical frameworks and mirrored Hoffmann Harding’s words from earlier that day. Still, they varied widely in tone: Most recommended students not come back to campus to gather their belongings unless they were in the South Bend area. Some said no students, regardless of location, could return to campus at all.At least three took the liberty to set time limits on how long students returning to campus could enter their dorms to retrieve personal items. Multiple students reported they had to gather their belongings in 30 minutes or less.The Observer reached out to all 31 rectors asking if any had imposed such a time limit. Many re-routed the inquiry to University Communications. None elected to comment.Speaking on the rectors’ behalf, University spokesperson Dennis Brown directed The Observer to Hoffmann Harding’s earlier emails. He did not say if any rectors set time limits on how long returning students could stay.Brown would not specify if rectors did not comment because they were not allowed to.“Like most organizations, we prefer to speak with one voice, especially in the midst of serious events such as the pandemic,” he said in an email. In hall-wide emails reviewed by The Observer, rectors also told their residents the University would contact those eligible to stay on campus by March 13. Only some told students to reach out to them if they had reasons to remain on campus they feared the University did not already know about.In a statement to The Observer, Brown said Notre Dame “was able to provide continued room and board in University-sponsored housing to all students who needed it.”This select group was initially about 250 students, Hoffmann Harding said in a March 18 email to the Notre Dame community. All others were told to leave campus by noon Tuesday, March 17.  The Office of Student Enrichment provided an avenue for students who needed other accommodations. Director Consuela Howell said the office works to ensure students’ personal and academic needs are met, funding food, housing, travel and essential electronics such as laptops.“We have received requests from 343 students,” Howell said in an email. “We were able to assist all but 20 whom we promptly connected to other resources, including Financial Aid, OIT or contacts within their colleges, who were better suited to address their concerns.”Still, sophomore Max O’Connor, a Lewis Hall resident, struggled to navigate move-out on the University’s deadline.Though O’Connor did not need to stay at Notre Dame while classes went remote, campus closed on a Tuesday and his father could not pick him up until the following weekend. O’Connor arranged to move in with other students off-campus, but reconsidered when he came down with a cough. Wanting to be cautious, he contacted University Health Services and emailed his rector, Clarice Ramirez, asking if he could stay in his room for a few more days. Ramirez did not respond to a request for comment.“I was supposed to go to someone else‘s place to sleep until my dad could pick me up this weekend, but I‘m a little scared I’m sick and I don‘t want to infect them,” O’Connor said in the email to Ramirez. “Because of this, I no longer have a place to stay and I‘m not sure what to do cause I don‘t want to get anyone sick so I am keeping to myself for now. I called UHS and they said they‘ll get back to me within two hours but I thought I should make you aware of the situation.”Ramirez replied and said she would not be able to readmit O‘Connor into the residence hall.“I wouldn’t be allowed to let you back into Lewis,” Ramirez said in the email. “What are your plans until your dad picks you up? Hope you feel better!”O’Connor did not respond. Fearing he would be forced out of his room and have nowhere to sleep, he said he kept to himself the rest of Tuesday. “I had nowhere to go at that point,” he said. “So I didn‘t want to leave.”For food, he relied on snacks from the Huddle Mart and whatever was around his room. In the meantime, he sought help from fellow students. For a while, he considered sleeping outside.“I’m just like, ‘I have a hammock and a rain fly. Worse comes to worst and I’m kicked out, I could just string my hammock up in some trees and sleep there,’” he said. “But since it was raining and chilly, and I had a cough, I didn’t think that was the best move.”Later Tuesday, he got permission to stay at a peer’s empty condo near campus. O’Connor said the UHS called him back close to 2 a.m. the next morning — seven hours after he first contacted them. The UHS told him he was probably fine, he said, given he only had a cough and no fever.The Observer reached out to UHS asking if wait times for phone consultations had inflated the week of March 16. Again, the request for comment was redirected to Brown. The UHS “has not experienced higher wait times than expected,” Brown said in an email.O’Connor safely moved into the empty condo the afternoon of March 18. He said though his journey home was rocky, he acknowledges move-out was not an easy task for Residential Life.“This is new to everyone. So, I get that it’s all a mess,” he said.  “I’m just glad I could have other students there to help.”Tags: coronavirus, move-out, Office of Student Affairs, Office of Student Enrichment, residence halls, University President Father John Jenkinslast_img read more

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: Jim Grossmann / NASAWASHINGTON – NASA is hoping you will join them in celebrating a new era of human space flight.On May 27, NASA Astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley will fly on Space-X’s Crew Dragon Spacecraft.It will mark the first time NASA has launched astronauts into orbit from the United States since the end of the space shuttle program in 2011.While they are discouraging visitors to see the lift-off in person, they do want Americans to participate virtually. NASA is encouraging the use of the hashtag launch America to support the space program. As part of the countdown, they are creating a special social media campaign to generate excitement.They want space enthusiasts to consider building homemade rockets or take selfies in their home-made spacesuits.Then they want fans to post those videos and pictures to social media with the hashtag #LaunchAmerica.NASA says they will re-post the winners to their global social media accounts. They hope the public gets behind this new public-private partnership approach to space travel.last_img read more

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Matt Kieffer / University of Notre Dame / CC BY-SA 2.0NEW YORK – New York’s Senator Chuck Schumer says if Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed to the Supreme Court, she should recuse herself from some cases.Speaking during his Sunday news conference, Schumer said Barrett should not hear cases involving the 2020 election or the Affordable Care Act.The Senate Minority Leader points to a 2017 law review article that suggests Barrett saw the Supreme Court decision upholding parts of the Affordable Care Act as illegitimate.“This is a moment unlike any other, because this nominee comes before us with serious conflict of interest,” said Schumer. “We’re here today to say that given Judge Barrett’s conflict of interest, she should recuse herself from any decision involving the Affordable Care Act and its protections, and any decision related to the election that we will have on November 3.” Supreme Court Justices are scheduled to hear an Affordable Care Act case next month.The Senate Judiciary Committee will start hearings on Monday for Barrett’s confirmation.last_img read more

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first_img View Comments She’s still glowing, she’s still crowing and she’s still going 93 years strong! Tony winner Carol Channing has been hoofing, singing, making us laugh, making us cry, and giving us “raspberries” and “jam” for the last 72 (!) years. In honor of the Oscar nominee’s big birthday, we’re saluting the spritely icon with a song. Click below to see Channing get schooled in soul by Teresa Graves on Laugh In. In a giant Afro wig. Obviously, this is from the ’70s. Cheers to your big day, Ms. Channing, and here’s to many, many more!last_img

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