May 10, 2021
  • 5:50 am Distinguishing East and West Antarctic sediment sources using the Pb isotope composition of detrital K-feldspar
  • 5:45 am Topographic shelf waves control seasonal melting near Antarctic Ice Shelf grounding lines
  • 5:56 am Harris scores 20, Nuggets rally in 4th and beat Jazz 103-88
  • 5:54 am Mitchell scores 46, Jazz beat Nuggets 118-108
  • 5:51 am 49ers have the NFL’s first-ever support dog

first_img Authorities View post tag: Service Back to overview,Home naval-today US Coast Guardsman Awarded for Role in Drug Busts US Coast Guardsman Awarded for Role in Drug Busts View post tag: americas View post tag: Busts View post tag: role Share this article View post tag: USCG View post tag: Drug View post tag: awards View post tag: Commandant View post tag: News by topic The Commandant of the Coast Guard Adm. Paul Zukunft recognized Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Baasch, a gunner’s mate aboard the Cutter Bertholf, for his actions during two counter narcotics operations off Colombia June 28 and July 20. Baasch’s direct involvement resulted in the seizure of more than 7,450 pounds of cocaine with an import value of more than $113 million and the apprehension of six suspected smugglers.During the first drug bust, Cutter Bertholf came across the Costa Rican-flagged fishing vessel Goliat I in international waters June 28. Costa Rica gave the Coast Guard crew permission to board the vessel. Boarding parties from the Cutter Bertholf including a team led by Baasch conducted a search of the vessel that lasted several days. The team located more than 5,900 pounds of cocaine hidden in the vessel’s fuel tank and detained four suspected smugglers.Baasch and the crew of Bertholf intercepted the fishing vessel Jandry in international waters about 90-miles northwest of Colombia during the second bust July 20. The vessel’s flag-state could not be determined so the Coast Guard boarded it to investigate. Narcotics testing kits picked up traces of cocaine on the vessel, and a team from Bertholf led by Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew Baasch began an extensive search of the boat’s compartments. Baasch and his team found more than 1,550 pounds of cocaine hidden throughout the vessel.Bertholf returned home from a 140-day counter narcotics deployment off the coast of Central and South America Aug. 11. Bertholf is the first of eight planned national security cutters, the service’s newest, most capable cutter and was built in Pascagoula, Miss., at Northrop Grumman Ship Systems.[mappress]Press Release, September 17, 2014; Image: USCG View post tag: Naval The US Coast Guard’s highest ranking officer made a surprise visit to Cutter Bertholf Tuesday to recognize a Coast Guardsman for his role in two drug busts off the Colombia coast. View post tag: member September 17, 2014 View post tag: Navylast_img read more

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first_img View post tag: HOSS Kongsberg Maritime Ltd (KML) Camera Group has been awarded multiple contracts for supply of the recently upgraded Helicopter Observation Surveillance System (HOSS).The proven HOSS is designed for real time video monitoring of heli-deck operations in extreme low-light conditions aboard Naval Surface Ships and is fully qualified to meet US MIL standards. The history of the HOSS spans nearly three decades with many of the first produced units still in service and excelling in performance in the challenging environments they encounter.All recent contracts will receive the latest version of HOSS. The upgraded system now fully supports IP (Internet Protocol) and can be easily integrated to 3rd party Video Management Software packages, which are becoming increasingly popular on board new build vessels and are being retro-fitted into existing vessels during mid-life upgrades. Due to the modular system design, backwards compatibility of the line replaceable modules is retained, thus ensuring a simple and cost effective upgrade path for legacy systems.The HOSS system upgrade was successfully implemented and trialled in early 2015 and the first units are set for delivery to the end users in Q3.Image: Kongsberg Authorities View post tag: Upgraded View post tag: Kongsberg Back to overview,Home naval-today US Orders Kongsberg’s Upgraded HOSS View post tag: americas August 17, 2015center_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: US View post tag: News by topic US Orders Kongsberg’s Upgraded HOSS View post tag: Navy Share this articlelast_img read more

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first_imgOcean City throws its support to the “Fight Like Hail,” 10-year-old Hailey Parker’s battle with cancer. Donald and Kim Parker join Hailey under the marquee at the Ocean City Music Pier on Friday.Kim and Donald Parker were worried about their 10-year-old daughter’s headaches.They took her for a routine MRI on March 4, and the results showed a parent’s worst nightmare.Hailey Parker underwent emergency surgery to remove parts of a brain tumor at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia on March 9.Donald, Hailey and Kim ParkerParker, who will enter fifth grade in Newtown Square, Pa., in the fall, is fighting glioblastoma, and undergoing chemotherapy and proton therapy.But the young dancer got a special lift in Ocean City on Friday. The girl had always dreamed of seeing her name on the marquee at the Ocean City Music Pier, and there it was, her motto: “Fight Like Hail.”Her dad said Hailey’s grandparents, Chuck and Peggy Friel, live in Ocean City, and another family member, Dana Lithicum, contacted city officials to see if they would help her out.Parker said the city couldn’t have been more accommodating and even provided a gift basket to the family.If anybody would like to join the young girl in her “Fight Like Hail,” they can learn more on the Fight Like Hail Facebook page or on the Fight Like Hail GoFundMe page.A great crowd of friends and family joins Hailey Parker under the marquee at the Ocean City Music Pier, which notes her fight against brain cancer.last_img read more

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first_imgKluman & Balter (Waltham Cross, Hertfordshire) has launched a range of speciality bread mixes, which include dark rye, light rye, sunflower and cereal grain breads, as well as continental styles such as a Pia Do mix for tomato bread and a ciabatta mix. The Kaybee range uses bread dressings from caraway to sunflower, sesame and blue poppy seeds.The firm also reports an increase in demand for its ethnic breads, tortillas and wraps, as well as wholegrain breads packed with nuts and seeds. “At Kluman & Balter we aim to make sure the bakers won’t be left behind when the demand shifts from sweet honey and sunflower seed bread to savoury olive ciabatta or any other recent fad,” says MD Danny Kluman.Kaybee also offers bread plant ingredients from divider oil to all-vegetable bread fat, plus a range of seeds and dressings.last_img read more

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first_imgNorthern Foods’ bakery division has seen solid seasonal demand over Christmas, according to its interim statement for the 13 weeks ended 27 December 2008. Underlying revenue was up 1.9%, with average prices increasing by 2%. Its Fox’s brand is still benefiting from the ‘Vinnie’ advertising campaign and the firm also noted a good performance for its own-label and Matthew Walker puddings. The third quarter also saw the launch of the firm’s branded ‘Scrummie’ range of puddings. In bakery, year to date underlying revenue grew by 4.6%.Within its chilled division, Northern Foods has responded to the current financial climate with new value ranges, including chilled pizza, value sandwiches and salads launched during the third quarter. Underlying revenue rose 5.3%.Stefan Barden, Chief Executive of Northern Foods, said: “Our key Christmas trading period has been delivered effectively and we continue to respond to the recessionary environment with new value ranges alongside our traditional premium products.”Group underlying sales for the third quarter rose 3%.last_img read more

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first_imgUK thermoformed packaging manufacturer Macpac has launched a new website aimed at all levels of business.Macpac has redesigned its website to address growing demand for bespoke packaging, from concept to production.The new site, which is optimised to work on PC, tablet and mobile, covers bespoke thermoforming packaging design, tool-making and manufacturing, as well as the in-house design and production facilities at the company’s Stockport premises. “Adopting fine-tuned environmentally-friendly design practice should always be considered at the start of the design process, working in collaboration with customers to minimise environmental impact and avoiding costly downstream delays and cancellation,” said a spokesperson.Macpac MD Graham Kershaw addresses consumer and media concerns over packaging waste, available to British Baker subscribers here.last_img read more

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first_imgRising jam band Formula 5 is gearing up for a big 2018. The Upstate New York upstarts have just announced a 21-show spring tour which spans April and May before culminating with festival appearances at Domefest, Sterling Stage Folkfest, and Disc Jam Music Festival. Along the way, Formula 5 will hit the Northeast, Midwest, and Southeast, performing with Perpetual Groove, McLovins, The Magic Beans, The Southern Belles, Goose, and Space Carnival.The band has also revealed plans for their second annual ‘Rock The Dock’ Music Festival, set to take place on July 13th, 2018 in Lake George, NY. In addition to Formula 5, Rock The Dock’s musical lineup includes Soule Monde (Featuring Ray Paczkowski & Russ Lawton of Trey Anastasio Band), Strange Machines, and Let’s Be Leonard, all of which can be enjoyed from any of the three historic Lake George steamboats that wrap around the stage. Craft and food vendors will also be on hand for Rock The Dock.“Rock The Dock was started as a way to celebrate the Lake George Steamboat Company‘s 200th anniversary by doing something that the company has never done in its history, hold a concert on the pier,” explains event manager Luke Dow. “The concert was a way of giving back to all the loyal patrons as well as showcase the talents of local artists and food trucks. This year’s festival will also be focused on giving back, with 25% of all ticket proceeds benefiting the FUND for Lake George, to help with their efforts to keep the lake clean and pristine for years to come.”You can secure tickets today on the festival’s website here.For more information on Formula 5’s spring tour or Rock the Dock, visit the band’s website.Formula 5 Spring Tour 2018 dates:April 6 – Nectar’s, Burlington, VT*April 7 – Buffalo Iron Works, Buffalo, NY^April 11 – Silk City, Philadelphia, PA*April 12 – DROM, NY, NY*April 13 – Hawks and Reed Performing Arts Center, Greenfield, MA*~April 14 – Pacific Standard Tavern, New Haven, CT*April 19 – The Waterhole, Saranac Lake, NYApril 20 – Jay Peak, Jay, VT$April 26 – Flour City Station, Rochester, NYApril 28 – The Hollow, Albany, NY%May 2 – Woodlands Tavern, Columbus, OHMay 3 – Octave, Covington, KYMay 4 – Lamasco, Evansville, INMay 5 – The Local, Boone, [email protected] 7 – Preservation Pub, Knoxville, TNMay 8 – Charleston Pour House, Charleston, SCMay 10 – The Whiskey, Wilmington, NCMay 11 – Tradition Brewing Company, Newport News, VAMay 17 – Domefest, Bedford, PAMay 26 – Sterling Stage Folkfest, Sterling, NYJune 9 – Disc Jam Music Festival, Stephentown, NY* with Goose^ with The Magic Beans~ with The Basement Cats$ with Perpetual Groove and McLovins% with Space [email protected] with The Southern BellesView Tour Dateslast_img read more

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first_img Read Full Story The 2012 Lowell Lecture features Andrew Delbanco, recent winner of the National Humanities Medal. The lecture takes place Wednesday, April 4, in Sever Hall, room 113, at 8 p.mOnce named by Time Magazine as “America’s Best Social Critic,” Delbanco offers a trenchant defense of a college education, and warns that it is becoming a privilege reserved for the relatively rich. In arguing for what a true college education should be, he demonstrates why making it available to as many young people as possible remains central to America’s democratic promise.Delbanco is Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, and is the author of numerous books including the award-winning Melville: His World and Work (2005). His essays appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, New Republic, New York Times Magazine, and other journals, writing on topics ranging from American literary and religious history to contemporary issues in higher education.A book signing will follow the lecture, with copies of Delbanco’s newly published, College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be, available for purchase.This event is free and open to the public.last_img read more

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first_imgWarren E.C. Wacker, former Henry K. Oliver Professor of Hygiene Emeritus, died on Dec. 29, 2012. Wacker held various positions at Harvard over the years. He was an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1957 to 1968, served as an associate professor of medicine from 1968 to 1971, and was named the Henry K. Oliver Professor of Hygiene in 1971. From then until 1989, he also served as the director of Harvard University Health Services, as well as a House Master to Mather, Kirkland, and Cabot Houses.Read the full obituary.last_img

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first_imgCapping decades of research, a new study may offer a breakthrough in treating dyskeratosis congenita and other so-called telomere diseases, in which cells age prematurely.Using cells donated by patients with the disease, researchers at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center identified several small molecules that appear to reverse this cellular aging process. Suneet Agarwal, the study’s senior investigator, hopes at least one of these compounds will advance toward clinical trials. Findings were published Tuesday in the journal Cell Stem Cell.If so, it could be the first treatment for dyskeratosis congenita, or DC, that could reverse all of the disease’s varying effects on the body. The current treatment, bone marrow transplant, is high-risk, and only helps restore the blood system, whereas DC affects multiple organs.Telomeres, telomerase, and healthThe compounds identified in the study restore telomeres, protective caps on the tips of our chromosomes that regulate how our cells age. Telomeres consist of repeating sequences of DNA that get shorter each time a cell divides.The body’s stem cells, which retain their youthful qualities, normally make an enzyme called telomerase that builds telomeres back up again. But when telomeres can’t be maintained, tissues age before their time. A spectrum of diseases can result — not just DC, but also aplastic anemia, liver cirrhosis, and pulmonary fibrosis.The discovery of telomerase 35 years ago, earning a Nobel Prize in 2009, galvanized the scientific world. Subsequent studies suggested the enzyme could be a key to reversing aging, as well as treating cancer, in which malignant cells become “immortal” and divide indefinitely.For years, researchers have tried to find a simple and safe way to manipulate telomerase, preserve telomeres, and create cures for telomere diseases.“Once human telomerase was identified, there were lots of biotech startups, lots of investment,” says Agarwal, who has researched the biology of telomerase for the past decade. “But it didn’t pan out. There are no drugs on the market, and companies have come and gone.”Finding a small molecule for telomere diseasesDC can be caused by mutations in any of multiple genes. Most of these mutations disrupt telomerase formation or function — in particular, by disrupting two molecules called TERT and TERC that join together to form telomerase. TERT is an enzyme made in stem cells, and TERC is a so-called non-coding RNA that acts as a template to create telomeres’ repeating DNA sequences. Both TERT and TERC are affected by a web of other genes that tune telomerase’s action.One of these genes is PARN. In 2015, Agarwal and colleagues showed in Nature Genetics that PARN is important for processing and stabilizing TERC. Mutations in PARN mean less TERC, less telomerase, and prematurely shortened telomeres.The new study, led by Harvard Medical School postdoctoral fellow Neha Nagpal, delved further, focusing on an enzyme that opposes PARN and destabilizes TERC, called PAPD5.“We thought if we targeted PAPD5, we could protect TERC and restore the proper balance of telomerase,” says Nagpal, first author on the paper.Nagpal and her colleagues first conducted large-scale screening studies to identify PAPD5 inhibitors, testing more than 100,000 known chemicals. They got 480 initial “hits,” which they ultimately narrowed to a small handful.They then tested the inhibitors in stem cells made from the Martins’ cells and those of other patients with DC. To the team’s delight, the compounds boosted TERC levels in the cells and restored telomeres to their normal length.But the real challenge was to see if the treatment would be safe and specific, affecting only the stem cells bearing TERT. To test this, the team introduced DC-causing PARN mutations into human blood stem cells, transplanted those cells into mice, then treated the mice with oral PAPD5 inhibitors. The compounds boosted TERC and restored telomere length in the transplanted stem cells, with no adverse effect on the mice or on the ability to form different kinds of blood cells.“This provided the hope that this could become a clinical treatment,” says Nagpal.The road aheadIn the future, Agarwal, Nagpal, and colleagues hope to validate PAPD5 inhibition for other diseases involving faulty maintenance of telomeres — and perhaps even aging itself. They are most excited about two compounds, known as BCH001 and RG7834 that are under further development.“We envision these to be a new class of oral medicines that target stem cells throughout the body,” Agarwal says. “We expect restoring telomeres in stem cells will increase tissue regenerative capacity in the blood, lungs, and other organs affected in DC and other diseases.”For a list of authors and funding sources, visit the website.last_img read more

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