May 12, 2021
  • 5:47 pm Data file: Redundancy and collective consultation
  • 5:47 pm How a tribunal tests for harm
  • 5:45 pm IT helps HR lay foundation for other functions
  • 5:43 pm Powercut
  • 5:39 pm Learning to think outside the books

first_imgData file: Redundancy and collective consultationOn 15 May 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. The latest in a series of articles that give the basics on key areas ofemployment legislation.  This issue welook at redundancy and collective consultationThe hard facts Trade Union and Labour (Consolidation) Act 1992 As amended by Collective Redundancies and Tupe (Amendment) Regulations1999 came into force 1 November 1999. Section 188 – (1) Establishes a duty for the employer to consult when proposing to dismissmore that 20 employees by way of redundancy – (1A) Sets out time-scales for consultation according to number of employees – (2) Sets out what the consultation should involve – (3) Outlines which employees should be included for the purpose ofdetermining the number of employees to be dismissed for redundancy – (4) The employer must disclose certain information in writing to therepresentatives – (5), (5A) The employer shall deliver information to representatives in personor by post and allow access to such accommodation and facilities as appropriate– (7) Special circumstances which render it not reasonably practicable foremployers to comply with the section – Section 188A Sets out requirements for the election of employeerepresentatives – Section 189-196 Complaints, protective awards and duty of employer to notifySecretary of State of certain redundancies www.legislation.hmso.gov.uk/acts/acts1992/Ukpga_19920052_en_1.htmEmployment Rights Act 1996 Came into force 28 July 1999. Establishes certain rights to be affordedto employee representatives. – Section 47 Right not to be subjected to any detriment – Section 61 Right to time off for employee representatives – Section 103 Establishes automatic unfair dismissal for an employee who isdismissed by reason of being an employee representative www.legislation.hmso.gov.uk/acts/acts1996/1996018.htmReading around the subject – The Department of Trade and Industry website provides information foremployers and employees facing a potential redundancy situation. The websitegives access to DTI guidance notes and research papers.  www.dti.gov.uk/er/redundancy.htm– The Acas website has a link to its advisory booklet on redundancy handling.  www.acas.org.ukIn the news – “CBI attacks unions over redundancy law ‘myths’” – FinancialTimes, 4 May 2001. http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/articles.html?id=010504000606&query=redundancy+consultation+– “Job cuts coming – but don’t tell the workers” – The Scotsman,19 April 2001 http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/articles.html?id=010419005771&query=redundancy– “Lay-offs push Paris to act on labour law” – The Independent, 25April 2001. http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/articles.html?id=010425002921&query=marks+and+spencer+AND+france+AND+redundancy– “Court blocks closure of M&S stores in Paris” – The Times,10 April 2001.  www.thetimes.co.uk/article/0,,3-112281,00.html Comments are closed. last_img read more

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first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article A harm test has been adopted by employment tribunals when consideringrequests to work part-time in cases brought under the Sex Discrimination Act. The following criteria are typically taken into account during a harm test: – The work requires continuity of service – It is not possible to do the job at the times the employee wants to work – The employee has supervisory responsibilities and there are no suitablemeans to delegate part of their responsibilities – The job involves team work – The cost of training someone else to do the remaining time or parts of thejob would be prohibitive – The nature of the work is such that it cannot be split How a tribunal tests for harmOn 5 Jun 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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first_imgIT helps HR lay foundation for other functionsOn 9 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article The Internet and technology will push HR up the pecking order in companies,Vance Kearney, vice-president for EMEA at Oracle, told delegates. He pointed out that no e-business could be effective without HR information,as sales, marketing, procurement and financial departments need the data. HR has a crucial part to play in developing global systems and instandardising and integrating those systems. But Kearney warned HR directors not to get carried away with their role asthe business partner and described the function as a support service likecustomer services or sales. “There is a big myth about HR. It is no different from any other kind ofservice, such as the sales or finance departments, it is just a service to thebusiness, and is not that elaborate,” he said. “We hire people, try not to loose them, get the best out them while wecan and while we have them.” Kearney said HR directors should follow other support functions in their useof technology. “Customer services and sales are being revolutionised by the Internet,bringing better data, service, happier customers with lower staff numbers. HRdirectors asking “what is next?” should be looking at these sales andservice departments.” Oracle’s experience demonstrates the cost and efficiency benefits of theInternet for HR. The company’s customer service call centres have seen a 45 per cent drop inthe number of calls since it introduced self-service assistance via theInternet. last_img read more

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first_img Comments are closed. What lessons can be learned from the Enron collapse and subsequent scandal?Philip Whiteley reportsThe biggest liquidation in corporate history; an impoverished pension fund;a flurry of writs; a link to the US president; the whiff of scandal – the Enronsaga has it all. It has some obvious lessons about the US pension system, accountancy andregulation. But the lessons for personnel professionals and for the biases ofgeneral management are far more profound and long-lasting. Bluntly, thebean-counters have suffered a major defeat. Last November the company admitted that it had overstated profits by $586mover five years. The stock price plunged to a few cents, having been more than$80 per share a year earlier. Many Enron employees, 60 per cent of whoseretirement fund was in Enron stock, were impoverished, and have launched legalaction. The affair has now become a major international scandal, featuring theresignation of chairman Kenneth Lay (a friend of President George W Bush), thesuicide of a director and a crisis of confidence for auditor Andersen,(formerly Arthur Andersen). Such headline-grabbing high drama tells only a fraction of the story,however. The Enron collapse exposes deep-seated flaws in the assumptions ofaccountancy and accountancy-based management. Enron’s failure cannot be brushedaside by pointing to a few errors and shredded documents. The scale of thecollapse renders such an easy conclusion inadequate. It was all too easy for ahandful of executives to hoodwink investors and business journalists that theircollective valuation of the firm changed from $80bn to less than $400m in thespace of a few months, without anything fundamental having changed in theorganisation. This points to some serious flaws in the way company performance is reportedand company potential analysed. For the personnel profession, however, theseproblems can be seen as good news because the missing element is people’sskills. “What Enron has proved is that the balance sheet is a totally obsoleteform of control,” says UK-based personnel consultant Paul Kearns. “Itshould shake the accountancy profession down to its socks. It is not the firsttime they have missed a major insolvency, yet no-one is pointing thefinger.” In the late 1990s and up to 2001, Enron was transformed from a gas pipelinecompany to a massive energy and commodities group. It entered into a frenzy ofdeal-making, buying companies all over the world as utility markets werederegulated, while also introducing innovative web services. It also engaged inpartnerships and risky investments using equity in which the potentialliability was not recorded in the official accounts.Indications that traditional accountancy has become anachronistic have beenaround for years, but have been regarded as a curio in management circles. In1997 Ernst & Young analysed some major companies and discovered that thevast bulk of value was represented by intangible matters. Even at oil giant BP,with its massive investments, intangible matters add up to 75 per cent of itsmarket value. The minor amendment to throw in a guess at ‘goodwill’ is inadequate. In aworld where tangible matters only account for between 0.1 per cent and 25 percent of a company’s value, conventional accounting is of limited use. It canonly record what it is set up to record, which is increasingly no more thantangential to the matters that make a company successful. Managerial practicehas not caught up, however; and most attention is still devoted to these nowquite minor matters. The obsession with financial records has become illogical.Complicating the matter was the speculative boom in dotcom stocks in1999-2000. The bursting of this speculative bubble appeared to weaken the casefor taking intangible matters seriously, as excitable investors ignored thefundamentals completely and grossly over-valued intangible assets of companiesthat turned out to be dud. But this is to misread the case. In the absence of meaningful information oncompany potential, the investors were guessing. They piled into all dotcoms,including the bad ones; and then rushed out of them all, including the goodones. Leif Edvinsson, a pioneer of intellectual capital, who invented a method forcalibrating intangibles while at assurance group Skandia, comments: “Whatwe need is much more intelligence about these dimensions. For example if you asan individual are investing in your competence upgrading, is that a loss orsomething good? In the accounts it appears as a loss. It is the same withresearch and development: is that a loss or a potential future? What happenedwith Enron is that the potential future was not taken into consideration. “It is in the interaction between people and research and development;between people and customers and between people and processes that valuelies,” Edvinsson told globalhr. As Baruch Lev, another of the pioneers of intellectual management pointsout, the fundamentals of accountancy practice are 500 years old, having beeninvented by the Venetian mathematician Luca Pacioli. He developed double-entrybook-keeping to help tradesmen keep track of purchases and sales. The systemcan only record historical transactions and the value of fixed assets. Lev, professor of accounting and finance at New York University’s Leonard NStern School of Business, says there has been complete stagnation in reportingsystems. Some of the most important assets to a company – acquisition ofcustomers; research and development, training of staff – appear as costs. He points out that when a drug passes its clinical tests, huge value iscreated – but there is no transaction. Edvinsson says the backward-looking, cost-based nature of accounting leadsto huge inaccuracies. In turn, this causes misallocation of resources byinvestment institutions. “It is like saying, what is the cost of good orbad weather? rather than looking at the weather forecast.” “Financial trading is done on derivatives; the shifting slopes of thecurves, which is a proxy of a proxy. You are betting on whether the enterpriseis a ship coming to harbour, rather than investigating what is on the ship orwho is at the helm. It is a very indirect assessment,” says Edvinsson. The convoluted language of the financial markets, and the plethora oftechniques used, disguise the fact that most investment is simply a form ofgambling, where the only information is historical and the tacit assumptionmade is that trends established in the past will continue. Hence the apparentlyimproving performance at Enron prompted more share purchases from investors whowere oblivious to the real state of the company. This leads to a problem with intangibles: the difference between the marketvalue and the book value ought to be the intellectual capital of theorganisation. But usually the investors are guessing at the intangibles andthey can get it horribly wrong, as with Enron and the dotcom speculativebubble. The mistakes are expensive for business and society, Edvinsson says:”To give you a number: the value of that kind of betting is $1,500bn per24 hours, mostly in guesswork. It is 50 times larger than the value of tradedgoods.” More accurate historical reporting would help, but it would still behistorical. Chief executives, with performance targets and share options, havemassive incentives to improve the short-term appearance of results, even ifthis does long-term damage to the earning potential of the organisation. Hencethe increasing desire for statements and measures on human capital,intellectual capital, intangible assets – call it what you will. Paul Kearns, a UK-based personnel consultant, makes the same critique ofconventional accounting as Edvinsson, though he argues against measuring humancapital, which he says runs the risk of becoming another form of bean-counting.Instead, executives and investors have to apply subjective judgement about theability and potential of a company’s people, and accept that not everything canbe measured. A few investors are switched on, he reports. “I was hired by the RoyalBank of Scotland, which was doing a presentation to City analysts. Someone saidto them ‘Your profits are good, you’re doing well but it is not tomorrow we arebothered about, but four or five years’ time, are you still going to bedelivering good results? What we can look at now to predict that is quality ofmanagement: do you have a pipeline of good managers coming through that willbring good people to the top?’ The chief executive went back to the company’s HR team and said he had noanswers. He needed some form of measurement that showed what the firm was doingto get the right people in place. What it produced was a simple systemidentifying good management potential and looking at the risk of particularmanagers leaving and so on. “The approach at the Royal Bank of Scotland is better than mostpeople’s answer. It said: ‘Here are the people we have identified as being ourfuture. This is how we are looking after them; this is how we can keep 75 percent of them for at least five years’. It starts to tell analysts somethingabout the future. “There is also the strong argument that it is not just aboutindividuals, but the whole organisation. You can look at individuals [forexample in a drug company], do you have the top R&D people? Are they goingto stay – are you looking after them? Do you work well as an organisation?”Concepts such as intellectual capital may not be the answer; but at leastthey address the problem. Moreover intangibles are more than just a trendySwedish experiment. The US Financial Accounting Standards Board put forward aproposal on the reporting of intangibles last year. A special report by theboard, Business and Financial Reporting, Challenges from the New Economyconcludes that improved business and financial reporting will require moreattention to intangibles, expanded and systematic use of non-financial metricsand forward-looking information. From 1 January this year, it has requiredcompanies to give annual updates on goodwill. While new measures of intangible capital, or human capital, will bedeveloped, refined and used to varying degrees to supplement information fromconventional accounts, the conceptual challenge remains. It is very difficult for traditional managers to shed the view that accountsare factual and all else is opinion. Personnel professionals have a tremendousopportunity to prove to their colleagues that rational decisions can only bemade in business by basing them on the skills and capacity of people and teams;and that accounts give only very partial information. “Of course people are sceptical, because you are dealing with years oftradition,” says Edvinsson. “But then people were once scepticalabout whether the earth was round.” How the “bottom line” can be divorced from realityPersonnel professionals are commonlytold by the finance community they are merely to deal with the “soft”matters, while executives and accountants hold the keys to the “hard”levers of business performance. Enron was the most dramatic example of theopposite being the case. The HR profession concerns itself with people skills,teamwork and motivation; with recruitment, succession planning and leadershipdevelopment – in short, with the real company and things that make adifference. In contrast Enron’s executives, obsessed with accountancy anddeal-making, were living in a virtual reality. US Congress investigatorsestimate Enron had a staggering 3,000 partnerships and subsidiaries, nearly 900of which were offshore. Executives were using Enron stock to make riskyinvestments, keeping the risk off the balance sheet but giving the impressionof growth.In the virtual reality these disciplines create, thesignificance of numbers is hugely inflated and the significance of skills isarbitrarily shrunk. No amount of accounting tricks would have fooled investorsof Enron if they had been geared to analysing the real company.This all hands a powerful argument at the disposal of personnelprofessionals, though it is one they rarely have the courage to deploy. Enronwill make it easier.How can intangibles. Orintellectual capital, be measured?www.intellectualcapital.se,an agency which Leif Edvinsson helped to set up, can carry out assessments ofthe intangible assets of a company. It seeks to give an indicator, a relativemeasure, of the strength of the following attributes:– Business recipe– Intellectual properties (such as patents)– Processes– Management and employee capability– Networks, such as recruitment, competence andR&D networks– Branding– CustomersMeasures are determined by interviewswith staff, managers and customers, from internal and external data. Theprocess takes six to eight weeks, and also results in an overall intellectualcapital rating. Around 200 employers, mostly IT firms in Scandinavia, have hadtheir intellectual capital rated in this way. PowercutOn 1 Mar 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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first_imgFeatures list 2021 – submitting content to Personnel TodayOn this page you will find details of how to submit content to Personnel Today. We do not publish a… Comments are closed. Learning to think outside the booksOn 14 Jan 2003 in Military, Personnel Today Related posts:center_img Previous Article Next Article Managementbooks are all very well, but when it comes to finding real answers to businessproblems, most of us would rather settle down with something completelydifferent. Paul Simpson offers an alternative reading list for HR professionalsEverynew year brings three things: a hangover, a set of new resolutions to make andbreak (even if the new resolutions are merely reheated leftovers), and aplethora of books which promise to change your life, the way you work or howyou think about the way you work.Thelast thing truly effective managers do is read books about other managers’highly effective habits. Nor do they pore over books in which the movement ofcheese, the Tao of something (usually something as far out as the Tao of theTeletubbies) or the activities of polar bear pirates hold the key to success.If it’s enlightenment and entertainment you’re after, this selection of sevenmagnificent (if unorthodox) books may have as much to say about humanresources, in its broadest sense, as the next Tom Peters opus. Let’s face it,nobody thrives on chaos, well, nobody except Attila The Hun and David Brent.AgainstOblivionIanHamiltonPublisher: VikingPrice: £20.00ISBN 067084909XThebook in a paragraphBiographicalessays on 45 20th Century poets by the late Ian Hamilton – the literary sleuthfamous for his pursuit of reclusive cult novelist JD Salinger – accompanied bya sample of the poet’s finest or most representative work. A simple, unoriginalidea inspired by Samuel Johnson’s classic Lives Of the English Poets which, inHamilton’s careful hands, works beautifully. So many of the lives (and untimelydeaths) told here echo each other.HRrelevanceEverycompany pays lip service to the need for creativity, yet this book is a tellingreminder that creative genius has a heavy price tag. Insanity, suicide,alcoholism and the perverse unpredictability of creativity are recurring themesin these lives. These poets are often confined to the margins of society inmuch the same way that, despite all the talk, genuinely creative people areoften marginalised in corporations, silently condemned for not being teamplayers – the very quality which often makes them so valuable. Thecluster of qualities which make employees creative (perseverance in the face offrustration; a high level of self-initiated, task-orientated; striving forexcellence; independence of judgement; autonomy; tolerance for ambiguity; andself-discipline in matters of work) are often exhibited in these lives. Youmight not employ many poets, but you probably do employ creative people whosubscribe to the manic highs, deep lows, and continual insecurity displayedhere –  albeit in a less extreme fashion.Thebottom lineToomany companies have tried to have their cake and eat it, looking for talentedcreative people who are also model employees. As this book conclusively proves,this is one particular circle that just isn’t going to square.TheArt Of HappinessbyThe Dalai Lama and Howard CutlerPublisher: Hodder MobiusPrice: £7.00ISBN 0340750154Thebook in a paragraphItis easy to be cynical about the Dalai Lama since he’s become a poster boy forthe likes of Richard Gere, but you can’t fail to be impressed by the fact that,after almost half a century of exile and oppression, he’s still smiling. Manyleaders have been far more miserable in public with far less cause. So it’seasy to understand why psychologist Howard Cutler assumed the Tibetan religiousleader might know a thing or two about the kind of questions which collectivelycome under the heading “the meaning of life”.HRrelevanceAnybook that grapples with so many big questions (such as, why do we suffer?) willhave some relevance to human resources. And although Cutler’s slightly smarmyprose style jars, this is still a refreshing read. Much of it is not thatrevolutionary or overtly Buddhist. And while the emphasis on kindness,compassion and the importance of seeing situations from different perspectivessounds trite in summary, this is an empowering book. Part of its charm is thatit doesn’t promise any quick fixes.Thebottom lineThatultimate rarity: a book about human relations that doesn’t offer simple answersyet still makes you feel good.Catch-22JosephHellerPublisher: VintagePrice: £6.99ISBN 0-09-947731-9Thebook in a paragraphAngry,hysterically funny, debut novel published 41 years ago, but still as relevanttoday. Typecast as an anti-war novel, this is actually a satire of corporatelife – the corporation so mercilessly pilloried just happens to be the USmilitary. Yossarian, the anti-hero, is trying to avoid combat by insisting he’smad, but as soon as he applies for a discharge he’s judged to be sane, becausehe’s showing rational concern for his own safety. “That’s some catch thatCatch 22,” he says. And a colleague agrees: “It’s the best thereis”.HRrelevanceIfyou really want to know how your most cynical staff really see your company,read Catch-22 and try to see your workplace through the eyes of Yossarian, the essentiallydecent ‘hero’, forced into cynicism by his understandable desire to stay alive.InColonel Cathcart, the officer whose only innovation is to make his pilots flymore missions, Heller has created a classic corporate villain, convincingbecause he isn’t evil just so stupid and desperate for recognition he isoblivious to the fact that he’s endangering his pilots’ lives. Heller’saccount of the politicking, egotism and one-upmanship in the militaryhierarchy, although marvellously exaggerated, will ring true with most managerswho have climbed a few inches up the corporate pole.Oneof the minor charms is the horribly hilarious tale of the world’s worstdisciplinary meeting in which a pilot is told not to interrupt and then to say‘sir’ when he does interrupt.Thebottom lineYou’lllaugh, unless you’ve had all the mirth surgically extracted from your soul, andthen you’ll wonder, uneasily, if your company behaves like Heller’s US AirForce.Churchill’sBlack DogAnthonyStorrPublisher: HarperCollinsPrice: £7.00ISBN 0006375669Thebook in a paragraphStorrwas one of the UK’s greatest psychiatrists and these essays on the theme ofcreativity contain some of his finest work. His analysis of such diversepersonalities as Winston Churchill, Carl Jung and Isaac Newton is surprising,thoughtful and entertaining. Storr reminds us that human nature cannot becategorised by which planet we metaphorically come from and that not all ourchallenges can be overcome by the acquisition of the right life coach.HRrelevanceWithChurchill now officially installed as the BBC’s greatest Briton (see page 23for Personnel Today’s version), this book may enjoy a long overdue revival. Storrflatly contradicts the view, espoused by many modern books on leadership, thatthe art of leading can be reduced to a few key teachable skills. Storr’sexamination of politicians, writers and scientists suggests that the roots ofcharismatic leadership often lies in the leader’s own, often deeply flawed,personality. Churchillis portrayed as what Carl Jung called ‘an intuitive introvert’, capable of bothrare insight and an utter lack of understanding of his colleagues’ feelings –not that unrecognisable as a type in today’s business world. As a leader hefought depression (what he called his “black dog”), his own nature (hisoften rash displays of physical courage may have been prompted by his own fearthat he lacked courage) and a lack of self-esteem caused by parental neglect.Thebottom lineAttimes, this has the breadth and depth of the work of Charles Handy, the authorof such leftfield business classics as The Empty Raincoat. Next to Storr’sanalysis of Churchill, most books about leadership seem distinctlytwo-dimensional.HiroshimaJohnHerseyPublisher: PenguinPrice: £7.00ISBN 014118437XThebook in a paragraphUSjournalist John Hersey’s account of the first atomic attack (which killed100,000) will leave you moved, appalled and yet, strangely, uplifted. Followinga handful of survivors of the world’s first nuclear bomb, Hersey tells anastonishing, but never simplistic, story containing more dramatic tension thanmost thrillers and more insight into humanity than many serious novels.HRrelevanceAcalamity of such magnitude doesn’t seem so unlikely after September 11. Andmuch of the rhetoric about what might happen in such a disaster seems to bebased on the assumption that ordinary people will simply panic. Yet Hersey’sbook, while emphasising the human destruction wreaked by the dropping of theatom bomb called Enola Gay, is even more powerful testimony to the incredibleresilience of the human spirit. Theunthinkable had just happened, but after mere seconds or minutes, the survivorsturned to the urgent business of helping each other and locating relatives andfriends. Unable to rely on the authorities, thousands performed acts of immenseheroism and altruism. Only later, the immediate crisis over, did manyexperience what we now call post-traumatic stress disorder. Itwould be trite to draw a simple lesson from this catastrophe, a point the bookitself eloquently makes. Yet in an era where the very idea of the ‘common good’sounds ironic, the heroism recounted here is genuinely inspiring. The book isfull of evil, the kind of evil chronicled daily in the media, but there’s goodhere too, displayed in the deadliest, most difficult circumstances.Thebottom lineTheperfect antidote to all those books in which business leaders congratulatethemselves on their heroic climb to the top.IndecentExposureDavidMcClintickPublisher: ColumbusPrice: £10.95ISBN 0-86287-010-0Thebook in a paragraphNotto be confused with Indecent Proposal (the film where Demi Moore gets $1m tosleep with Robert Redford), this is an incredibly readable, fly-on-the-wallaccount of one of the Hollywood’s biggest scandals – Columbia Pictures producerDavid Begelman defrauds the studio yet the parent company stands by him, to thedisgust of Columbia’s chief executive and many other senior managers. In itsway, the Begelman affair is even more incredible than the recent tales ofcorporate misdeeds.HRrelevanceThehuman mechanics of a power struggle between a chief exec who wants to do theright thing and a board that would prefer a cover up wrongdoing are laid barehere. Written by a Wall Street Journal reporter, the book details theastonishing fashion in which a $10,000 embezzlement paralysed a company. Columbia,like many other corporations confronted with skulduggery, is in denial and paysfor its refusal to penalise a popular, successful yet unethical executive. Insome ways, the book is more frightening than any account of Enron because thedirectors and managers are not freaks, yet they almost wreck the company. Theevasions, the U-turns, the way the issue of dealing with malfeasance issubsumed into a wider struggle, all seem horribly plausible.Thebottom lineAchilling cautionary tale, this is a more accurate (and insightful) indictmentof US corporate life gone awry than Oliver Stone’s Wall Street.TheOfficeRickyGervais and Stephen MerchantPublisher: BBCPrice: £9.99ISBN 0563488476Thebook in a paragraph”DavidBrent is a sad idiot going through a mid-life crisis and suffering a job he’snot proud of.” Or so says Ricky Gervais the creator and player of the UK’smost infamous fictional boss. Don’t worry, the man who wants to be the RupertMurdoch of paper merchanting, or of Slough, will be back, if not for a fullseries then for a TV movie. One of the many things that makes this sitcomcompulsive viewing is that, like Fawlty Towers in the 1970s, it held up adistorting mirror to the British workplace.HRrelevanceThemotivational speech which closes to Tina Turner’s Simply The Best, the lipservice to (and fatal undermining of) policies against racism and sexism in theworkplace… the manager who has regurgitated all the business books he’s everread… these are painfully and amusingly familiar. Theterrifying truth is that, while HR departments are doing their utmost toimprove the workplace, almost every company has a manager like the Brentmeisterwho can shatter morale by saying ‘Morning all’. Hopefully, this series shouldensure that no company ever dares use Simply The Best (or, for that matter,Search For The Hero Inside Yourself) as a theme for a staff conference everagain.Thebottom lineDavidBrent is fast becoming the most famous British manager since Richard Bransonand Basil Fawlty.last_img read more

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first_imgMore firms recognise how diversity pays dividendsOn 1 Jul 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. There has been a significant increase over the past 12 months in the numberof organisations that have a clear business case for having race issues on theboardroom agenda. Race for Opportunity’s (RfO) Top 100 report, to be launched tomorrow, showsthe proportion of organisations that have a business case for diversity linkedto business objectives has increased over the last year from 45 per cent to 63per cent. Allan Leighton, RfO chairman, said the report, based on a survey of 120employers, shows an increasing commitment from UK plc to ethnic minorities inall aspects of business. However, warns Leighton, who is also chairman of the Royal Mail, if businessleaders fail to face up to the need for a business strategy on race, they willsuffer both commercially and in terms of branding. “Quite simply, communities equal profitable customers and potentialemployees. If you rely on traditional perceptions of who these groups are, you limityour pool of talent and your target market,” he said. The top performer in this year’s study is Lloyds TSB. The firm has embeddeddiversity in its business strategy and can demonstrate the impact it is makingon the bottom line. It has witnessed a 30 per cent increase in sales in somebranches where staffing has been changed to reflect the ethnicity of customersand a dramatic reduction in ethnic minority staff turnover. Mike Fairey, deputy group chief executive at Lloyds TSB, said:”Effective leadership at all levels, not just at the board but rightthrough all levels of management, is vital to improving performance onrace.” www.raceforopportunity.org.ukBy Quentin ReadeKey facts– 63 per cent of respondents have a clear business case fordiversity linked to business objectives.– 90 per cent understand the values and aspirations ofdifferent ethnic minority customers and – 97 per cent claim to have evaluated this in financial terms– 98 per cent of RfO organisations have a board-level‘champion’ for racial diversity– 81 per cent are developing links with schools in areas highlypopulated by ethnic minorities and– 60 per cent are involved with local ethnic minority trainingprojectslast_img read more

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first_img Comments are closed. HCM vital for business successOn 6 Apr 2004 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Duncan Brown, assistant director-general at the Chartered Institute ofPersonnel and Development, explains why human capital management should top thebusiness agenda.At the Amsterdam summit, I gave an overview on the Chartered Institute ofPersonnel and Development’s (CIPD) extensive work on human capital. It iscertainly an area of growing interest, and it was the fourth such presentationthat I have made this year already. The likely future requirement of UK companies to report on their humancapital in annual reports and accounts is – at last – galvanising moreconcerted attention, and, hopefully, action. The event largely consisted of illustrations of the application of Kaplanand Norton’s original methodology, now detailed further in terms of itsapplication to the so-called ‘intangible assets’ – of which people are the mostsignificant. Some may find this specific application a little over-engineered for their tastes,although the case studies shed a lot of light on the broader process ofagreeing how to best leverage staff for competitive advantage, and how tomeasure and achieve it. The CIPD is currently drafting a free guide on how to go about human capitalreporting with a taskforce of industry experts. It aims to give a broader viewof the measurement process and how to go about it, and should be available bymid 2004. But whatever methodology or approach you prefer, the taskforce members havereinforced that the huge potential value that people can add to an organisationcan only be realised if you measure and manage that value effectively. HRprofessionals need to play a leading role in doing this. The message is: do it proactively yourself to add value to your people, yourbusiness and your function, rather than waiting to have it imposed on you fromthe outside. www.cipd.co.uk Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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first_img Read full article Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. More updates from HR Tech Europe 2015Shared from missc on 15 Apr 2015 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img

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first_imgNew Pb analyses of K feldspars (Kfs) from Archaean–Mesozoic crystalline rocks from across the Weddell Sea region of Antarctica show Pb isotopic compositions that vary geographically. Five distinct basement provinces are defined, each with characteristic Kfs Pb compositions, and indicate that the comparison of the Pb isotopic composition of individual detrital Kfs can be used as a sedimentary provenance tool in this region. This tool is tested on Permian sandstones deposited in a retro-arc foreland basin because the potential source regions for these sandstones, the active Palaeopacific margin arc of West Antarctica and uplifted regions of now ice-covered East Antarctica, comprise rocks with markedly different Pb isotope compositions. Pb compositions of detrital Kfs from sandstone samples collected from Dronning Maud Land suggest that their provenance was entirely from within East Antarctica, while those collected from the Theron Mountains, Coats Land, were wholly derived from the active margin of West Antarctica. Kfs Pb composition of bedrock samples is largely dependent on age and because Kfs tends to only survive a single cycle of erosion, transport, deposition and diagenesis, its provenance when compared with that determined by detrital zircon geochronology, may qualify what proportion of the more robust mineral zircon has been recycled through several sedimentary cycles. Detrital zircon analyses from a Permian sandstone from the Theron Mountains suggest that 45% of its detrital zircon was recycled from pre-existing (meta)sedimentary rocks. The detrital feldspar data also indicate that Archaean and 2.1 Ga crust, with a very different Pb isotope composition to any exposed in the Weddell Sea region, is likely to exist beneath the East Antarctic Ice sheet.last_img read more

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first_imgThe buttressing potential of ice shelves is modulated by changes in subshelf melting, in response to changing ocean conditions. We analyze the temporal variability in subshelf melting using an autonomous phase-sensitive radio-echo sounder near the grounding line of the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf in East Antarctica. When combined with additional oceanographic evidence of seasonal variations in the stratification and the amplification of diurnal tides around the shelf break topography (Gunnerus Bank), the results suggest an intricate mechanism in which topographic waves control the seasonal melt rate variability near the grounding line. This mechanism has not been considered before and has the potential to enhance local melt rates without advecting different water masses. As topographic waves seem to strengthen in a stratified ocean, the freshening of Antarctic surface water, predicted by observations and models, is likely to increase future basal melting in this area. Plain Language Summary Ice shelves (or the floating parts of the Antarctic ice sheet) lose primarily mass through melting at their bottom in contact with the ocean. This thins them and makes them more vulnerable to potential collapse. To understand the processes governing such thinning, direct and long-time measurements are essential. Here we report on the first high-resolution time series of direct melt measurements on the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf in Dronning Maud Land during 2016. We find that subshelf melt varies on both seasonal and daily time scales. Temporal variations stem from topographical ocean waves that originate on the continental shelf and transfer ocean properties without time delay within the ice shelf cavity. Therefore, seasonal variations highly depend on the presence/absence of sea ice in front of the ice shelf, which impact the strength of topographical waves. This mechanism is highly efficient at increasing the ice-ocean exchanges and may explain regional differences in ice shelf melt.last_img read more

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