March 2, 2021
  • 7:42 am Bankruptcy Judge Asks 50 Cent Why He Has Stacks Of Cash In Instagram Photos
  • 7:42 am George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, Meryl Streep & More Announced For Bernie Worrell Fundraiser
  • 7:41 am Mining the Deep End in Search of a Utopian Dream: Envision Festival 2016
  • 7:35 am Phish Sneaks Sally Through San Francisco For A Monday Night Jammer [Recap]
  • 7:34 am Spafford Adds Second Chicago Show Due To Popular Demand

first_imgAs has been the fashion at Terrapin Crossroads this year, Phil Lesh & Friends played a full setlist from a past Grateful Dead show. Bringing along son/guitarist Grahame Lesh, guitarist Stu Allen, drumming duo Ezra Lipp and Alex Koford, and keyboardist Scott Guberman, this particular show was a re-creation of the Dead’s September 28th, 1993 show at the Boston Garden, in Boston, MA.Take a listen to the show, which includes “Touch of Grey”, “Bird Song”, “China Cat Sunflower > I Know You Rider”, “Throwing Stones” and more. This particular show/setlist was one of six that the Dead played at Boston Garden that year. Listen to the full audio below, courtesy of Quinfolk and WMWV Radio:You can also watch “So Many Roads” from the show, courtesy of Andy Logan:Setlist: Phil Lesh & Friends at Terrapin Crossroads, San Rafael, CA – 9/20/16Set One: Touch Of Grey -> Greatest Story Ever Told, Row Jimmy, New Minglewood Blues, So Many Roads, When I Paint My Masterpiece, Bird SongSet Two: China Cat Sunflower -> I Know You Rider, Samson And Delilah, Uncle John’s Band -> Playing In The Band -> Drums -> Space -> Attics Of My Life -> Throwing Stones -> Good Lovin’Encore: U.S. Blues[via JamBase]last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgGeologists have found evidence that sea ice extended to the equator 716.5 million years ago, bringing new precision to a “snowball Earth” event long suspected of occurring around that time.Led by scientists at Harvard University, the team reports on its work in the journal Science (released March 4). The new findings — based on an analysis of ancient tropical rocks in remote northwestern Canada — bolster the theory that the planet has, at times in the past, been covered with ice at all latitudes.“This is the first time that the Sturtian glaciation [the name for that ice age] has been shown to have occurred at tropical latitudes, providing direct evidence that this particular glaciation was a ‘snowball Earth’ event,” said lead author Francis A. Macdonald, an assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard. “Our data also suggests that the Sturtian glaciation lasted a minimum of 5 million years.”The survival of eukaryotic life ­­­— organisms composed of one or more cells, each with a nucleus enclosed by a membrane — throughout this period indicates that sunlight and surface water remained available somewhere on the surface of Earth. The earliest animals arose at roughly the same time, following a major proliferation of eukaryotes.Even on a snowball Earth, Macdonald said, there would be temperature gradients, and it is likely that ice would be dynamic: flowing, thinning, and forming local patches of open water, providing refuge for life.“The fossil record suggests that all of the major eukaryotic groups, with the possible exception of animals, existed before the Sturtian glaciation,” Macdonald said. “The questions that arise from this are: If a snowball Earth existed, how did these eukaryotes survive? Moreover, did the Sturtian snowball Earth stimulate evolution and the origin of animals?”“From an evolutionary perspective,” he added, “it’s not always a bad thing for life on Earth to face severe stress.”The rocks that Macdonald and his colleagues analyzed in Canada’s Yukon Territory showed glacial deposits and other signs of glaciation, such as striated clasts, ice-rafted debris, and deformation of soft sediments. The scientists were able to determine, based on the magnetism and composition of these rocks, that 716.5 million years ago they were located at sea level in the tropics, at about 10 degrees latitude.“Because of the high albedo [light reflection] of ice, climate modeling has long predicted that if sea ice were ever to develop within 30 degrees latitude of the equator, the whole ocean would rapidly freeze over,” Macdonald said. “So our result implies quite strongly that ice would have been found at all latitudes during the Sturtian glaciation.”Scientists don’t know exactly what caused this glaciation or what ended it, but Macdonald says its age of 716.5 million years closely matches the age of a large igneous province stretching more than 930 miles from Alaska to Ellesmere Island in far northeastern Canada. This coincidence could mean the glaciation was either precipitated or terminated by volcanic activity.Macdonald’s co-authors on the Science paper are research assistant Phoebe A. Cohen; David T. Johnston, assistant professor of earth and planetary sciences; and Daniel P. Schrag, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology and Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, all of Harvard. Other co-authors are Mark D. Schmitz and James L. Crowley of Boise State University; Charles F. Roots of the Geological Survey of Canada; David S. Jones of Washington University in St. Louis; Adam C. Maloof of Princeton University; and Justin V. Strauss.The work was supported by the Polar Continental Shelf Project and the National Science Foundation’s Geobiology and Environmental Geochemistry Program.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgWine is becoming a big business in Georgia, and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is working to support this growing sector of the economy by providing new expertise for wine growers.Earlier this month, UGA Extension hired its first full-time wine grape specialist. Cain Hickey will begin his work with Georgia’s wine growers on March 1.As the state’s Extension viticulturist, Hickey will help wine grape growers in the north Georgia mountains and in west Georgia improve cultural practices in their vineyards, researching new growing practices and varieties that could improve the quality and renown of Georgia’s wines. He’ll also work with the growers of the state’s more traditional vineyard crop, muscadine grapes.”Wine grapes are a growing agricultural commodity in Georgia, which offers some distinct advantages,” said Mark McCann, UGA Extension’s Agriculture and Natural Resources assistant dean. “They can fit in small and medium acreage, winemaking is a value-added process and the aesthetic properties of a vineyard offer agritourism opportunities. The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is pleased to add a viticulturist to serve this growing industry.”In 2005, almost all of the state’s 1,834 acres of grapevines were muscadine grapes grown in south and central Georgia. In 2015 – the latest year for which statistics are available – UGA’s Georgia farm gate value report found that the locus of Georgia’s wine production had spread. While more than 1,000 acres of muscadine grapes are still spread across the state, more growers have introduced traditional and hybrid wine grapes to farms in north Georgia.Habersham County, home to a half-dozen wineries, produced more than $2 million in grapes in 2015. According to a 2014 study by the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, Georgia’s wineries have an annual impact of more than $7 million on the state’s economy.UGA Extension has supported the burgeoning grape and winemaking industry with plant disease and pest experts and through county Extension agents, and Hickey will serve to further Extension’s support efforts. When he begins in March, Hickey will be an assistant professor of viticulture in the college’s Department of Horticulture. Hickey received his doctorate in 2016 from Virginia Tech, where he focused on applied research in several viticultural areas, including irrigation management, cover crop and rootstock use, and canopy and fruit-zone management. He’s worked in viticulture research since 2007.Hickey looks forward to working with Georgia grape and wine industry members to solve regional vineyard management issues through his extension and research appointment.For more information about UGA Extension’s support of Georgia’s agricultural industries, visit extension.uga.edu.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgGeorgia farmers with reduced plant stands can help alleviate those problems next season by correcting settings and using downforce on their planters, according to Wes Porter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension irrigation specialist and precision agriculture expert.Downforce is the pressure farmers apply to their row unit to ensure that it’s maintaining the depth at which the planter is set. Farmers typically set planter depth, but don’t always check or change the downforce of their planters, Porter said.Producers can save time, seed and money by understanding the use of downforce when planting their crops. The downforce system on the planter can help growers avoid planting seed at the incorrect depth — either too deep or too shallow — which can leave the crop vulnerable to the environment, resulting in a lack of germination and stand establishment and subsequent yield loss.High temperatures and lack of rainfall in May led to difficult planting conditions for farmers with dryland fields, or fields lacking adequate irrigation. In multiple fields, Porter discovered that if seeds weren’t planted deep enough, they didn’t germinate and emerge.“If we didn’t put the seed down where it needed to be, right near the surface, soil temperatures were so hot this year we basically burned the seeds and they never germinated,” Porter said. “You can still see poor stands now in fields all around the state.”It’s important to consider the field conditions when setting downforce. Imagine a grower who tries to plant in late spring when it’s dry and near or at 100 degrees Fahrenheit. His planter requires a lot more downforce to plant seeds at the proper depth because the soil is harder. If the grower plants in moist soil, he doesn’t need as much downforce, Porter explained.The same is true if you compare a sandy soil with a soil that contains more clay. Sandy soil is much looser and softer, so farmers don’t need as much downforce versus planting in a clay soil. The amount of downforce is critical for seed to reach the appropriate depth.“There are advanced control systems available, either retrofitted on the tractor or from the factory, that will help maintain downforce at a uniform setting throughout the field, aiding in maintaining the target seed depth. It’s really important, if we want to achieve that proper depth, that we set a proper downforce,” Porter said.Porter learned from communicating with farmers that downforce is a planting factor most don’t usually consider.“A lot of farmers don’t even really know how to properly set the downforce on their planters to match their field conditions. That’s why we started this project — to really show the importance and educate our producers on it,” he said.Porter was recently honored for his work in precision agriculture. For more information, see the CAES Media Newswire.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgBy Dialogo June 14, 2010 Military personnel will reinforce the police to fight the growing crime wave that has led to a spate of daily killings in Honduras, according to a decree approved by the Honduran Congress. The decree establishes that “the Secretary of Defense will put at the disposal of the Secretary of Security the appropriate personnel of the Honduran Armed Forces needed for the National Police to efficiently maintain public order.” According to the decree, the National Police and the armed forces will coordinate their activities with the other state security organs in order to ensure “the prevention and control of and the fight against crime, for the purpose of protecting lives and property within the national territory.” The police, around 14,000 strong, have found themselves powerless to stop the wave of killings, linked chiefly to drug trafficking and kidnappings, of which there have been about forty-four so far this year, so that the help of the 12,000 members of the armed forces is required.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgDesigning Spaces™ airing on the Lifetime® Channel recently featured an educational segment about making the path to homeownership easier. During the episode, the desire for homeownership and the financial hurdles faced by a millennial couple were highlighted.Debi Marie, the host of the show, interviewed Matt Young, Senior VP of Sales with Genworth Mortgage Insurance Corporation about private mortgage insurance (PMI), which could be a perfect fit for members of your credit union who are facing similar questions and challengesHere are some key points from Debi’s interview with Matt:Removing the 20% Down Barrier for Potential HomebuyersAny homeowner knows that accumulating the 20% down for their first home is often one of the biggest financial challenges of their lives. By using PMI, your prospective member homebuyers can purchase a home without having to accumulate the full 20% down payment. This is a big deal since this option can shave years off of the saving process, allowing your members to become homeowners sooner. continue reading » 18SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgThink of the first three letters Differentiate, Recreate and Educate as the ingredients to bake a one-of-a-kind-out-of-this-world-cake. Now we put them all together and automate (or bake) it.Kirk recommends the new member experience be the first place to try marketing automation.I recently sat in on a conference call regarding Net Promoter Score and found out that most credit unions are not “blowing members away” when they open up their new account.  In fact, very few members will give a promoter score citing “Too early to tell” or “I just opened the account and I don’t feel I know them yet.”But this was even more disconcerting. In a Pacific NW study of credit unions and banks they found that Chase AND Bank of America scored higher with Millennials (18-34) on the “overall recommend” question. They did not cite service as the reason but rather just the opposite. They do a great job making it possible for the Millennial customer to NEVER have to interact with a human. And they do that using automation. continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

READ MORE

first_img“After more than two years of talks between Dubrovnik Airport and Qatar Airways, we finally managed to achieve our goal by establishing this line that will enable direct connection of Dubrovnik with the countries of the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand and Africa. In 2019, Qatar Airways was named the best business class airline in the world by Skytrax, and also won five other top awards for excellence.”, Said from Dubrovnik Airport. Qatar Airways has announced two new routes that will start operating in the first half of 2020. Flights to Dubrovnik, the airline’s second destination after Zagreb, will begin on April 20 next year. “We are pleased to announce that Dubrovnik and Santorini will join our global network in 2020. We are committed to providing our passengers with as many direct links as possible”, Said Akbar Al Baker, CEO of Qatar Airways. As another destination, the company announced Santorini. Qatar Airways thus becomes the first Gulf carrier to establish a direct flight to that Greek destination. Flights will begin on May 20, 2020.center_img Source / photo: Qatar Airways; Dubrovnik Airport; Pixabay The flight will operate three times a week from April 20 to May 18, and from May 18 to September 30 five times a week. From September 30 to October 24 again three times a week. It will operate an Airbus 320 aircraft with 12 seats in business class and 132 seats in economy class.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionBail reforms make New Yorkers unsafe Everyone is shaking their heads over the new criminal justice standards for New York. Certainly, with the people we have now in the state Legislature with our feckless governor and mayor of New York, citizens are now in fear. No bail, no jail, no crime. Feel free to strike anyone who annoys you. Feel free to steal anything you want. Feel free to rob banks. Feel free to not spend any time in jail, pay any penalty and go about your wrongful life.Am I the only one who sees a similarity to Nazi Germany in the early 30s? — crimes against people and in those cases encouraged by the government. I am sure from their misguided actions, de Blasio and Cuomo would love their own brown shirts.Geraldine KrawitzSaratoga SpringsJaquith shouldn’t be on multiple boardsIn Niskayuna, we will have a town board member serving on three boards: the town, school and the IDA. In 2019, The Gazette had an editorial questioning the wisdom of being on both the town and school boards. I also question this, and I believe that Ms. Jaquith is exercising very poor judgment.While on the school board, she supported a five-year contract for the superintendent, giving him a salary over $200,000. He has no residency requirement, commuting from Herkimer. This was another poor decision.Also, she never informed the voters that it was her intent to remain on the school board.Transparency does not appear to be her main priority. She cites that it is legal despite the fact that being legal doesn’t mean ethical.There are enough examples of this throughout history. In my opinion, this is simply political greed. The town and taxpayers will not be served well by this decision.Linda RizzoNiskayunaObserve disrespect violence in schoolsKudos to Theresa Doty.Her Jan. 5 letter (“Need major effort to stop school violence”) thankfully addressed the unruliness that has existed in the hallways of Schenectady High School.Definitely address all gang-related issues. However, I think the violent and disrespectful behaviors that have occurred are the real culprits in the high school.I implore every school board member to conduct unannounced visits to the school and just walk the halls. I’m sure you will see what Theresa Doty’s children and others see who attend these schools. I would hope the school board members will listen carefully to parents like Theresa Doty and observe for themselves the behaviors that exist in the halls of Schenectady High School.Josepha AbbaSchenectady Schenectady must fix broken sidewalksAll this talk about sidewalks not being cleared after a snowfall, as I understand, is the responsibility of the homeowner. But whose responsibility is it for those ghost houses and rental units?The biggest problem we have in our neighborhood is the sidewalks themselves. They are uneven, broken and a hazard to walk on to begin with. When is Schenectady going to fix them so people can actually use them?Right now, it is almost impossible to push a stroller on the sidewalk. If it doesn’t wake the baby, the stroller wheels get caught on the uneven edges. It is time for Schenectady to do something about the sidewalks so they are usable.Sue WardSchenectady To patients, families: Rally for St. Clare’sThe New Year is here. Time for the supporters of the St Clare’s pensioners to stand up, shout out, get angry and be heard.As former caregivers at your now-lost community hospital, we deserve what we were promised and what we are owed.We call on those whose families we cared for from birth through death to stand beside us. Please make your voices heard in our support. Please call or write your local lawmakers and the Catholic Diocese and demand to be heard on our behalf.We cared for you and yours now please care for us. Every voice counts. Thank you.Karen SacchettiSchenectadyQuestion U.S. rank on healthcare listsDon Steiner wrote in the Jan. 3 Gazette an interesting letter on the sustainability of our healthcare system. He pointed out rightly that administrative costs, cost of drugs, defensive medicine, and wages and staffing are driving up healthcare costs everywhere.Few people would take issue with any of those points.However, in his next to last paragraph, he indicated that the World Health Organization ranked the United States 37th in healthcare and the Commonwealth Fund placed the United States last among the top 11 industrial countries in overall healthcare.I believe most Americans would be hard-pressed to name 36 countries, never mind 36 with better healthcare than the United States.Even the ranking of 11th in industrialized countries by The Commonwealth Fund seems questionable. There are a few, but what country would you pick to provide your healthcare?Gerard F. HavasyClifton ParkReturn Lady Liberty to her historic homeFirst, I want to say that I agree with James A. Wilson’s Jan. 1 letter (“Put Lady Liberty back where she belongs.”) It’s called Liberty Park for several reasons.The statue was there first for 50 years. Hmm, no respect for the original monument dedication. How do you explain to your grandchildren that what once was a historical site has no more meaning or room there for her anymore in the new colorful park?I do love the new, improved park. But I’m still looking for the Lady that intrigued my interest in exploring the history. Now that history and interest is gone.The new place where she lies is disgraceful, sad, no color, no meaning, and not real safe to explore with children. It was just put there to save face. Mayor McCarthy, you have done wrong by your constituents who have asked for it to be put back in its original place.Colleen K. LodgeSchenectadyWe must stand up to hate in all its formscenter_img In light of the recent anti-Semitic attacks across the county, we stand against hate. And we remind each other that “never again” is now.Sometimes, hate is clear. Hate is burning a cross or attacking a synagogue. Hate is separating families or locking children in cages. Hate is mass incarceration or voter suppression. In fact, it’s easy to be against these kinds of hate.But hate is bigger than all that, because it’s so much smaller.Hate is the small bits of bigotry and intolerance that we all see every day. There is hate in the names that we call each other when we are mad. There is hate in telling an inappropriate joke. Or not saying anything when you hear one.There is hate in spreading gossip about a neighbor, an enemy or a political candidate. There is hate in inflammatory postcards and divisive lawn signs that come out two days before an election.Hate isn’t just the big stuff. It’s also the small stuff.Hate is destroying our community. We must all take stock of our thoughts and actions. We must call out hate in all its forms. And take responsibility to stop it.Jon LemelinNiskayunaKnow what goes into the products you buyWe can all fight climate change one step at a time. First, we can commit to buy less, reduce, reuse and recycle. And when we do buy items, we can do the research and buy products that are environmentally safe for our homes and the planet.Recently I needed to replace a rug in my home. Having had an allergic reaction to synthetic carpet in the past, I was determined to avoid purchasing anything that would adversely affect the air quality where I live, and I wanted a Fair Trade item. I began by exploring natural fibers such as wool, sisal, jute, seagrass and organic cotton. I learned that while selecting a natural fiber was a good start, it was also imperative to know if the dye was plant-based and what chemicals (if any) were used in the production process. Chemicals that are stain-resistant, fireproof, etc., can be toxic for years to come. Some of this information can be found in the product description.Another concern was the carpet backing. I wanted to avoid petroleum-based backing. I found that backings of hemp, cotton or natural latex were all options. If you need a rug pad, avoid the synthetic products and choose natural pads.Websites such as Global Organic Textile Standards (GOTS), OEKO-TEX, and GREENGUARD Gold Certification and ecologycenter.org are invaluable. The GOTS site addresses Fair Trade issues too.Natural products are sometimes more expensive, but there are deals to be found if you look for them.Cynde SchwartzNiskayunaTonko doesn’t care about military vetsRegarding Bill Shapiro’s Jan. 3 letter (“Tonko works hard to protect environment”) praising Paul Tonko: How much did he pay you for writing this letter? Tonko is a liberal Democrat who will sit down with undocumented immigrants and says he will help them, but he will not sit with me and help me personally with my problem with the VA hospital. I am a 100% disabled World War II veteran.You said he went to college at Clarkson University. Well, he had better go back, because he has not learned the difference between American veterans and undocumented immigrants. Anyone who praises and supports him is not a good American. Remember that on Election Day.Vincent BelardoAlbanyDo all we can to build up teacher diversityThe state Education Department’s recent report on teacher diversity (“State education report draws sharp focus on lagging teacher diversity in state”, Jan. 6) was hardly shocking.New York State United Teachers (NYSUT) has been engaging with educators around the state to not just identify root causes of this issue, but also to find solutions.Education policymakers must first consider how current education policies affect students’ school experiences. For example, when a state test mislabels an 8-year-old child as failing, that sends the wrong message about why working in a school as an adult will be positive.Next, to create a pipeline of teachers of color, expanding the state programs focused on diversifying college teacher prep programs and addressing student debt is key.For those pursuing teaching, mentorship is crucial, particularly for teachers of color. We see higher rates of attrition and burnout among teachers of color than for white teachers, with 22% leaving the profession. Expanding the state’s Mentor Teacher Internship Program is one step toward addressing that issue.Mentoring that helps all early-career educators identify systemic injustice, an issue that strikes to the heart of the school experience issue, also is important. NYSUT, through a National Education Association grant, has established a mentoring program in Schenectady and Amsterdam to help these teachers be more mindful of bias and start addressing it.As New York faces a teacher shortage across the board, any way we can improve rates of diversity is a boon to tackling the shortage as a whole.Jolene T. DiBrangoLathamThe writer is executive vice president of New York State United Teachers. Priesthood demands personal sacrificesThe priesthood exists as proof that Christ is the Word incarnate.Though every vocation is a calling to emanate Jesus’ teachings, the ordained are tasked with answering the spiritual needs of His flock.This duty is incompatible with commercial, professional or personal pursuits and instead requires a life of prayer, poverty and abstinence.Recognizing this, Jesus told Peter to first set aside his net (Mt 4:19), then to lay down his sword (Mt 26:52), and finally to tend his flock (Jn 21:16). Peter’s yes to his closest friend was a sacrifice of his personal wants and an embrace of his God-given potential.Oftentimes, the secularization of the church hinders its ability to minister to the faithful. We see this in the competition among parishes, clergy posturing to be bishop, and a preoccupation with institutional approaches. Past evidence dating back 1,000 years included married priests whose children would inherit church property, a practice that ended acceptance of married priests.Today, Pope Francis’ desire to renege on that reversal rests on the current shortage of priests, especially in the Amazon and Pacific islands. The term “shortage” arbitrarily refers to the distribution of parishes and availability of sacraments. This inevitably leads to the fallacy of recruiting priests or loosening the requirements instead of working towards a culture of discernment. People could then live authentic lives according to their respective callings.Stephen DansereauAlbanyFind money to fix Stryker Rd. in GilboaGov. Cuomo, I see in recent weeks you are able to come up with millions of dollars for miscellaneous projects in New York. How about looking at rebuilding Stryker Road in the town of Gilboa that was washed away back in 2011 by Hurricane Irene?FEMA denied rebuilding it for approximately $8 million but approved the building of a covered bridge nearby in the town of Blenheim for approximately $7 million.There are many local people and campers that are must follow detours because FEMA dropped the ball on this project. Please look into this project and maybe New York can be the hero for fixing the road.Scott AndersonScotiaLiberty statue serves as civic inspirationTo say I’m displeased with the long-in-coming relegation of our Lady Liberty to the corner of Erie Boulevard and Union Street is an understatement.It’s an attempt to appease that was not obviously, in my opinion, given much thought. The location is downright obnoxious for the reasons stated in the Aug. 30 Daily Gazette editorial and by several other writers to the editor.We should honor our heritage not relegate it to the trash bin of history. Our local, state and national symbols, supporting what it means to be an aspirational and active American citizen, need to be honored as well as displayed respectfully.As our National Lady Liberty, in New York Harbor, stands at the Gateway to America, so should our communities Lady stand restored to our Gateway Park, aka Liberty Park, the Gateway to our county seat.The city and county of Schenectady have a long and storied history starting in the 1600s. Schenectady was built and is still populated by generations of immigrants who are “Americans.”Lady Liberty is a silent sentinel with a big message: “Liberty must be continually nurtured in every generation so as to keep it front and center – we ignore it at our peril.”I was there as a young Boy Scout at our Lady’s dedication. I was learning about what it means to be a citizen, a significant step in my citizenship education. On many occasions, over many years, I have spoken about it with pride to my fellow citizens, young and old alike.Lance R. JacksonGlenvilleMore from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgMikel Arteta explains his reasons for wanting to sign Cedric Soares and Pablo Mari Comment Mikel Arteta has made two signings for Arsenal during the January transfer window (Picture: Getty)Mikel Arteta insists he is happy with Arsenal’s work during the January transfer window following the arrivals of Pablo Mari and Cedric Soares.Injuries to the likes of Calum Chambers, Sead Kolasinac and Kieran Tierney had left Unai Emery’s successor fretting about the lack of defensive options available to him.Spaniard Mari, who was on Manchester City’s books but failed to make a single appearance for the Premier League champions, joined initially on loan but the Gunners have an option to make the move a permanent one at the end of the season.Cedric, who also arrives on loan, will offer experienced back-up to Hector Bellerin, who has struggled to maintain his fitness and find his best form since returning from a cruciate knee ligament injury that ruled him out for 10 months.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTExplaining the move for Mari, Arteta said: ‘For me he is very important he balances what I want to do from the backline, he gives us more options, more solutions and opens up the pitch more. Advertisement Arteta previews Arsenal’s trip to BurnleyTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 4:31FullscreenArteta previews Arsenal’s trip to Burnleyhttps://metro.co.uk/video/arteta-previews-arsenals-trip-burnley-2100234/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.MORE: Martin Keown rates Arsenal’s deadline day deal for Cedric SoaresMORE: Edu explains Arsenal transfer move for Cedric Soarescenter_img Metro Sport ReporterFriday 31 Jan 2020 1:53 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.8kShares Pablo Mari could make his Arsenal debut against Burnley on Sunday (Picture: Getty)‘He is a player we have been following for a few months and we are delighted to have him here.’The 26-year-old is eligible to make his debut at Burnley on Sunday but Arsenal fans will have to wait a little while longer to see their other new recruit in action after Arteta confirmed Cedric is still struggling with a foot injury.Nevertheless, Arteta is delighted to have the Portugal international on board, adding: ‘He is a player who has big experience, he’s played in this country and in different leagues.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘He knows what it means. He has been very willing to go to another top club. He has that desire and that commitment. I followed him a few seasons ago and I really like what he can bring and it was the right conditions for us as well to try and improve the squad.On his fitness he added: ‘He was being assessed yesterday and we will have more results today but he has a little issue and I don’t think he will be available to play.’ Advertisementlast_img read more

READ MORE