October 19, 2019
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first_imgThe Prince of Wales and The Duke of Cambridge last week called on the highest levels of government to form a global partnership to stop the illegal trade in wildlife – a trade that presents a grave threat not only to our natural world, but also to our global security.The conference took place in the St James’s Palace State Apartments, London.The conference featured speeches from The Prince of Wales and The Duke of Cambridge, a short film highlighting WildAid’s work with Yao Ming to end the demand for ivory in China, and remarks on effective demand reduction through communication by WildAid’s Executive Director, Peter Knights. The audience consisted of more than 160 NGOs and government representatives from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America that play a role in the illegal trade: those that are a source of the wildlife and related products; those where the contraband crosses their national borders; and those whose citizens fuel the demand for the illegal products.“We face one of the most serious threats to wildlife ever, and we must treat it as a battle, because it is precisely that,” remarked HRH The Prince of Wales. “It is clearly vital to tackle the demand for such products amongst consumers by recruiting the help of every form of media to communicate more widely and effectively its disastrous consequences.”“As a father and a soon-to-be grandfather, I find it inconceivable that our children and grandchildren could live in a world bereft of these animals,” he added. “Humanity is less than humanity without the rest of creation. Their destruction will diminish us all.”In recent months, the killing of elephants and rhinos has reached epidemic levels with losses threatening certain populations of African elephant with extinction for the first time within a decade. Both the black and white rhino are also under unprecedented attack for their horn on a scale previously unseen. According to conference organizers, “experts are finding increasing evidence that the illegal activity is being driven by international organized criminal networks and, in some cases, terrorist and rebel militia groups. It seems no country with valuable wildlife populations is immune from the activity, which not only robs citizens of natural resources, but also contributes to global instability.”“The poaching and trafficking crises invariably coincide with rapid economic growth in consuming markets,” said WildAid’s Knights. “We can only solve these crises in consuming nations as we did until 2008, with stronger laws in consuming countries and consumer awareness that reduced demand. When the buying stops, the killing can too.”WildAid was honored to stand with The Prince of Wales and the British Government to put what has become a battle against wildlife trafficking at the top of the global agenda. The meeting focused on promoting international efforts to:· reduce demand for endangered wildlife and related products in markets around the world;· increase capacity for global law enforcement against the organized syndicates engaged in this activity; · assist rural communities to find long-term, viable alternatives to the trade.Convened by The Prince’s International Sustainability Unit (ISU) and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), it is hoped that this conference will be the first stage in a process which will result in key countries signing a “Declaration” at a meeting in Autumn 2013 to commit at the highest levels to end the illegal trade in wildlife.Source:WildAidlast_img read more

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first_imgIn May 2013, Angelina Jolie wrote an op-ed in the New York Times about why she had gone through with a preventative double mastectomy the previous month.Her family history of breast and ovarian cancer and testing positive for a mutation in the BRCA 1 gene, which raised her chances of developing the same cancer that killed her mother by over 60 percent, were compelling reasons.With hereditary breast cancer it is typical for women to be diagnosed at a young age, the average age for BRCA mutation being 41 compared to age 61 in breast cancer patients without the mutation. It is typical to see multiple cases on the same side of the family, and often ovarian cancer as well.That Jolie went public with this information was a surprise, and the resulting reaction in the medical world has been dubbed The Angelina Effect. Curious about what the effect actually was, Sunnybrook’s Odette Cancer Centre in Toronto decided to do a study on the clinic’s referrals six months previous to Jolie’s announcement and the six months following it.According to the CBC, the clinic’s study showed that referrals rose 90 percent, those who qualified for testing (based on prevalence in their family history) rose 105 percent, and detection of women who were carrying the gene rose 110 percent. About a third of the patients in the study who had the mutation, like Jolie, decided to have the double mastectomies. The rest opted for less invasive surgeries or heightened screening.Head of Preventive Oncology at the Odette Cancer Centre, Dr. Andrea Eisen believes Jolie’s decision to go public has saved lives. “I really think she did,” Dr. Eisen told CBC. “We’ve certainly seen in our own clinic setting a far greater number of women coming forward for genetic assessment than before her story became public.“Her piece gave a lot of detailed information about the genetics of breast cancer and the details of her own risk. It wasn’t as we often see with celebrity disclosures. There was enough information for women to think about their family histories and make a good decision about genetic counseling.”Copyright ©2014Look to the Starslast_img read more

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first_imgThe Tug McGraw Foundation (TMF), a national nonprofit that raises awareness, supports programs, and drives research to build greater understanding for brain-related trauma and disease, announced today back-to-back fundraising events for research and programming to improve quality of life for children and adults with brain tumors, our nation’s battle-wounded soldiers, and others suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and/or Trauma Brain Injury (TBI).“The Tug McGraw Celebrity Pro Am Sporting Clay Tournament continues to be an event that artists, athletes, and our Nashville community look forward to every year,” said Tim McGraw, Grammy-winning singer, songwriter and actor. “The work of the TMF allows Tug’s memory and spirit to live on. I know he would be very proud that they have expanded the original mission by supporting programs that help veterans and their families suffering from PTSD and TBI, as well as helping athletes that have suffered brain trauma. My family and I are very grateful to the fans, friends, professionals, and other celebrities that give their time, assistance, and philanthropy in support of this meaningful organization.”On Monday, June 8, 2015 the TMF will host an An Evening in the Songwriters Round, emceed by writer, producer and Great American Country host, and SiriusXM radio host, Storme Warren at the historic Franklin Theatre in Franklin, Tennessee. A portion of the proceeds from the Songwriters Round will be directed to the International Mental Health Research Organization’s (IMHRO) One Mind Institute.United States combat marine veteran Marcus Fox will kick off this extraordinary evening with his song “I’m Still Coming Home,” which earned the 2014 Nashville Independent Music Award Song of the Year. Some of Nashville’s leading singers/songwriters will then share the stage and trade off playing their original songs. The round includes: Mark Irwin, Lance Miller, Brad Warren, Brett Warren, and special guest Charles Esten (Deacon) from the hit TV show, “Nashville.”Tickets for this event will go fast, so make reservations early. Tickets and sponsorships are available. Reservations can be made online here, or by phone (707) 947-7122.Already sold-out, The 4th Annual Tug McGraw Foundation Celebrity Sporting Clay Pro-Am will be held on Tuesday, June 9, 2015 at the Nashville Gun Club in Nashville, Tennessee. Sponsored by Tarver Land Development and course sponsor First Data, the event will feature an exciting array of celebrities from the music, sports, and professional sporting clay communities, all vying for a chance to be crowned champions.An all-star lineup of celebrities will participate including Tim McGraw, Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana, Rodney Atkins, Chase Rice, Cassadee Pope (winner of “The Voice” Season 3), Mike Fisher (of the NHL Nashville Predators), ESPN’s John Kruk, Andy Griggs, Andy Ross, Chase Bryant, Christopher Close, Craig Campbell, John McDermott, Lance Miller, Chris Lucas, Preston Brust (of the LoCash Cowboys), BIG 98 Midday Personality Amy Paige, and Headline Country host Storme Warren.“I am excited and extremely honored to be a part of this cause and to lend my voice to the Tug McGraw Foundation,” said Joe Montana. “I have been a huge fan of both Tim and Faith for years and can honestly say that the immense energy that they give on stage is only a fraction of what they devote to the Tug McGraw Foundation. I had the pleasure of meeting Tug a few years back, and am happy to be here to honor his memory in a fun-spirited way that is so true to his character.”The exclusive star-studded event is a sporting clay shooting competition between 17 teams consisting of four shooters, a pro, and a celebrity. There will be great food and a post event awards cocktail reception. For more information about becoming a sponsor of the event, please visit www.tugmcgraw.org.last_img read more

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first_imgThe international community must urgently increase education funding for Syrian refugees to avoid a lost generation resulting from the country’s civil war, education activist Malala Yousafzai said on Monday (July 13).Malala visits Azraq refugee campCredit/Copyright: UNHCR/C HerwigThe Nobel Peace Prize winner was on the second day of a visit to meet Syrian refugee children in Lebanon and Jordan that coincided with her 18th birthday.“Education is a basic human right for every child. Being a refugee should not be used as an excuse for saying that we cannot afford this child’s education,” Malala told a news conference in Azraq camp, which is currently host to more than 20,000 Syrian refugees.“There are rich countries in this world who can afford to spend money on weapons, who can afford to spend money on the war in Syria, but when it comes to education most of them have been quite stingy,” she said.During her visit to Azraq, Malala announced a $ 250,000 grant from her non-profit Malala Fund to provide tutoring and academic support for adolescent girls in the camp. The funding will be provided jointly to UNHCR and UNICEF, and among other initiatives will help young refugees prepare for their university entrance exams.Malala also visited the shelter of 16-year-old Syrian refugee Muzon, herself a vocal advocate for education within the camp, particularly among young girls.Read more here.Source:UNHCRlast_img read more

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first_imgVets, animal behaviourists and dog welfare groups have lined up to join the National Anti-Vivisection Society in opposing “scientifically regressive and widely opposed” plans to breed beagle dogs for experimentation in Yorkshire.It’s Me or The Dog star Victoria Stilwell, TV vets Emma Milne and Scott Miller and Animals Matter author Marc Bekoff lead the call for the government to overturn Secretary of State Greg Clark’s decision last month overriding his predecessor Eric Pickles and repeated rejections of the dog farm by the local council. The animal experts say giving the facility the go-ahead contravenes the government’s pledge to reduce animal use and will “plunge science back into the dark ages”.Since the announcement was made on 16 July over half a million people have signed a petition against the controversial plans. Reacting at the time, Queen guitarist and Save-Me Trust founder Brian May said he was “sickened” that the facility was going ahead “ignoring the views of the public and local authorities”, while Downton Abbey’s Peter Egan spoke of the “gentle animals” who would be “force-fed and killed in crude tests that are of little use to people.” Both Brian May and Peter Egan join BBC Radio 2 DJ Mark Radcliffe in supporting the NAVS campaign against the facility, where as many as 2,000 dogs will be bred for research each year.NAVS President Jan Creamer said, “The NAVS stands united with animal experts, the public, local authorities and residents in opposing the Yorkshire beagle farm and urge the government to take the democratic, ethical and progressive path and overturn the Secretary of State’s decision. Experimenting on dogs produces unscientific and unreliable results due to differences between species, yet there are sophisticated replacement techniques already in use. Increasing breeding facilities for outdated animal tests is a backward step and at odds with the government’s own commitment and the international trend towards advanced scientific methods”.There has been a substantial reduction in dog experiments over the past ten years. Latest statistics show that 3,554 dogs were experimented on in Britain in 2013, down from 5,088 in 2003. The NAVS is concerned that the surge in availability of beagles could lead to a dramatic increase in dog experimentation, simply because of supply and convenience.Dogs are commonly used for ‘toxicology’ experiments where they may be force-fed chemicals and have toxic substances pumped into their bodies, which can result in extremely painful effects and even death. Almost all individuals are killed at the end of the experiment.NAVS investigations have revealed the shockingly crude and unscientific reality of the tests, for which, being small and docile, beagles are preferred test subjects – chemicals accidentally pumped into dogs’ lungs; puppies force-fed weed-killer which had been on sale for 20 years; tests conducted after human studies began (against scientific protocol); human studies conducted after adverse results in dogs.These tests are fundamentally flawed due to differences between dog and human physiology – chocolate, grapes and human medicines such as Ibruprofen are deemed safe for humans, but are potentially harmful to dogs.Science is moving away from using animals with far more advanced alternatives available including organs on chips, cell cultures and computer modelling. The government has pledged to reduce the number of animals in experiments and, as stated by Grahame Morris MP, the beagle farm decision is “completely out-of-step” with this commitment.Yorkshire Evergreen is owned by US multinational animal supplier Marshall BioResources and has been attempting to push through its plans for four years, appealing multiple rejections. Earlier this year, one of its former directors was convicted of illegally killing and mistreating animals by an Italian court. Marshall BioResources’ Italian facility ‘Green Hill’ was closed and the dogs have been re-homed.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Elders welcome the announcement of the agreement on the “end of conflict” in Colombia, including the terms for a bilateral ceasefire between the Colombian security forces and the FARC guerrilla, as well as the modalities for disarmament and security guarantees.Kofi Annan, Chair of The Elders, said: “We are encouraged by the work so far accomplished in Havana and by the perseverance of both parties in moving the peace process towards a successful conclusion. We commend the important roles that Norway and Cuba are playing as guarantors and Chile and Venezuela as accompanying countries, as well as the US. We also welcome the role a United Nations political mission will play in providing independent and credible international verification of the ceasefire.”Ernesto Zedillo, member of The Elders, added: “Colombia is on the cusp of reaching an historic agreement. The Colombian people deserve peace and I sincerely hope they will seize this opportunity to end the violence they have lived through for generations, to bring redress for millions of victims, and to bring real opportunities to the people of the regions most affected by conflict. Peace is not an event but a process. It must be a national project, bringing together all Colombian patriots in an inclusive fashion, across political rifts, to have a respectful debate when they vote on the agreements and to ensure they are fully implemented.”last_img read more

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first_imgThis week, the inaugural Blue Jacket Fashion Show took place at Pier59 Studios as part of New York Men’s Fashion Week.In partnership with Johnson & Johnson, the Blue Jacket Fashion Show benefited the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), founded by philanthropist and financier Michael Milken.The Blue Jacket Fashion Show brought together the fashion, entertainment, sports, healthcare and media worlds around a national platform to openly discuss men’s cancer issues, with an emphasis on prostate cancer. Coinciding with February’s Cancer Prevention Month and New York Men’s Fashion Week, the Blue Jacket Fashion Show included designers such as John Varvatos, Nick Graham, Joseph Abboud, Nicole Miller, Proper Cloth, Stephen F, Maggie Norris, Theory, Gustavo Moscoso, Craft Atlantic, Rag and Bone, Thom Browne and Haspel who used their creative talents to “reinvent” the traditional blue blazer.Those walking the runway wearing one-of-a-kind blue jackets included models, actors, athletes, members of the media and business titans. Among those who walked are: actor Mario Cantone, musician and model Ian Mellencamp, New York Giants Wide Receiver Victor Cruz, TV personality Carson Kressley, science educator and host of the forthcoming Netflix series Bill Nye Saves the World Bill Nye, New York Yankees Pitcher CC Sabathia, New York Post’s Richard Johnson, model Alex Lundqvist, and CNN Anchor Don Lemon. Following the show, all of the specially designed jackets modeled were included in a live auction, with proceeds going to the Prostate Cancer Foundation.According to the Prostate Cancer Foundation, statistics show that prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in America. It affects every one out of eight men at some point in their lifetimes. Every 3.3 minutes a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer, and millions of men and their families are fighting this disease on any given day across the globe.As the world’s largest healthcare company, Johnson & Johnson is committed to creating and bringing to market life-changing cancer therapies for the people who need them most. In addition to partnering with the Blue Jacket campaign to help raise awareness of prostate cancer prevention and treatment options, Johnson & Johnson has also committed to donating $1 to the Prostate Cancer Foundation for every photo shared using the free Johnson & Johnson Donate a Photo app. For every 30 photos that are shared, one hour of research and development for breakthrough cancer treatments will be funded.“Today, our work being done in precision oncology research is unprecedented with new discoveries happening daily,” said Jonathan W. Simons, MD, president and chief executive officer of PCF. “Our continually expanding global research enterprise brings together the brightest minds in prostate cancer research and other scientific areas to collaborate across borders and institutional lines. This team approach has sparked and accelerated innovative projects that deliver life-saving results and are bringing us closer than ever to a cure. We are very pleased to team with the Blue Jacket Fashion Show to help raise awareness and additional funding for prostate cancer research. Curing together, we can change the future for all cancer patients.”“As partners of the Blue Jacket Fashion Show, we have an important opportunity to continue our efforts to raise awareness of prostate cancer symptoms, prevention and treatment options,” said Joaquin Duato, Executive Vice President and Worldwide Chairman, Pharmaceuticals, Johnson & Johnson. “Johnson & Johnson and our Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies have a strong history of innovation in prostate cancer, including investigational new medicines in our pipeline. We are also proud of our commitment of collaborating closely with healthcare systems, policymakers and advocates to ensure access to our medicines. Together, we can transform how cancer is treated so patients can experience more of life’s meaningful moments.”last_img read more

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first_imgIt is not unusual to spot a supermodel on the Champs-Élysées, but this is not Paris. It is a busy market street with the same name in the Za’atari Refugee Camp in Jordan. And supermodel and activist Naomi Campbell is here for a different reason than fashion.Naomi Campbell participates in a finger painting class with 4-year-old Yara at Save the Children’s Sunshine KindergartenCredit/Copyright: Save the Children/Jordi MatasShe is here to understand and witness first-hand the work Save the Children is doing with child refugees, who make up nearly 50 percent of the 80,000 refugees in the camp.Campbell’s visit comes ahead of the six-year mark of the Syrian conflict on Mar. 15, which has now raged on longer than World War II. Her trip is part of a new partnership between Save the Children and Campbell’s charitable foundation, Fashion for Relief, which has been involved in raising money to help with several humanitarian situations over the last decade. The foundation was founded in 2005 to aid Hurricane Katrina victims and has since hosted events across the world to raise vital funds for Haiti in 2010, the Japanese earthquake and tsunami relief in 2011 and the Ebola crisis in 2016. This year’s event will be held in Cannes in May and all proceeds will go towards Save the Children and its Syria Crisis Appeal.“It was a humbling experience,” said Campbell of visiting Za’atari. “I wasn’t quite sure what to expect as I traveled out there, but I came away full of hope for their future and with a renewed admiration for the positive spirit of humanity. That’s not to say we didn’t meet people who had been through terrible ordeals, it was just so impressive how well they were handling the situation. Save the Children’s team was fantastic, and all the work they are doing on the ground is really incredible. Everybody commits so much time and energy to making these people’s lives better.”During Campbell’s trip, she visited a Save the Children-supported kindergarten where she saw children taking part in singing and dancing sessions. Playing music helps familiarize the children with loud noises – like the bombings and airstrikes they have experienced – in the hopes that they become less afraid and better able to cope with these deafening sounds.One of the refugee children Campbell met with is Yara, 4, who wears a Mickey Mouse knit hat and happily finger paints with the supermodel. She stopped talking for two years because of the trauma she suffered living through the Syrian war. Now enrolled in Save the Children’s Sunshine Kindergarten and Early Learning Center, Yara is growing in confidence and has begun speaking again.Campbell saw adolescents training in vocational skills as well, from barbering and hairdressing to tailoring and jewelry-making. This prepares the teenagers for working life once they turn 18 years of age. Campbell also spent time with 13-year-old Nida who lost her uncle to the war and had to flee Damascus when her local school was bombed. She talked of regularly witnessing dead bodies on the way to school.Despite the challenging circumstances, Campbell was inspired by the resilience and strength of the children and families she met. Their positivity, aspirations and hopes for the future seem undented in the face of everything they have been through.The six-year mark of the Syrian conflict coincides with the publication of Invisible Wounds, a major research project by Save the Children, which found widespread evidence of ‘toxic stress’ and mental health issues among children still living inside Syria. For the Invisible Wounds report, Save the Children and its Syrian partners interviewed more than 450 children, adolescents and adults inside Syria in the largest study of its kind conducted during the course of the conflict. It found that children are living in an almost constant state of fear, terrified by shelling, airstrikes and ongoing violence, with devastating psychological consequences.For more information on Save the Children’s work on the Syrian crisis, go here. To donate to Save the Children’s Syrian Relief Fund, please visit Savethechildren.org/Syria or text SYRIA to 20222 donate $25.last_img read more

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first_imgAccording to the City, US companies invested over $800 million last year by filming in Toronto.“These overall figures confirm the expanding economic impact of Toronto’s screen-based industry and validates its contribution to the vitality, prosperity and creativity of our city,” said Councillor Paula Fletcher (Ward 30 Toronto-Danforth), chair of the Toronto Film, Television and Digital Media Board, in the release.All the numbers above show a larger Toronto industry success story.“Combining the $2 billion in investment noted above with figures from broadcasters and the interactive digital media cluster results in a total investment figure of $3.26 billion for all of Toronto’s film, television and digital media production in 2016,” according to the City.That number represents a 16% increase from 2015.Expect to see more filming as Toronto continues to take over Hollywood North.The detailed report can be found here. Other production highlights for 2016 in the city included:• Foreign major production investment in film and television grew to $794 million, a 49-per-cent increase from 2015. Since 2014, foreign production investment has increased by 129 per cent.• Investment in animation and visual effects grew to $403 million, a 179-per-cent increase from the $144.5 million reported in 2015. Since 2014, investment in this area has increased by 363 per cent from $87.1 million.• Television series, foreign and domestic, remains the dominant investment type in Toronto with an increase to $908 million in 2016.• Investment in commercials production continued to rise to record levels, growing to $380 million, a 10-per-cent increase from the $345 million reported in 2015. Since 2014, investment in this area has increased by 95 per cent from $195 million. (Note that this type of investment is measured by Toronto but not by other levels of government.)• The number of location filming shoot days has seen three record breaking years, with an increase to 7,280 shoot days in 2016.“The sector’s exceptional growth is the result of the City’s abundance of high quality talent and world-class facilities, supported by provincial and federal tax incentives available to productions in Toronto,” said Councillor Michael Thompson (Ward 37 Scarborough Centre), Chair of the Economic Development Committee.Tory has been a major supporter of Toronto’s film industry. In January, the mayor headed to California in a bid to take home a larger chunk of the film and television production business that has been going to Vancouver.My message to the film, TV & digital industry globally is clear – Toronto is open for business. #FilmTO— John Tory (@JohnTory) February 27, 2017 Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitter “The epic growth of our creative screen sector illustrates that Toronto is a compelling and competitive global production hub with a long-term, sustainable success story,” said Mayor John Tory in the release. “We’re proud of Toronto’s film and television industry and we want it to continue to grow. We will keep working with our industry partners so they have what they need to create jobs, attract talent and contribute to the economy.”Last year’s reported investment was a 33% increase over 2015’s $1.55 billion.mayor @JohnTory sharing update on impact of #film & #tv industry in 2016. Two Billions & 40K jobs. impressive! pic.twitter.com/7NEdTFzHpo— Hani Roustom (@HaniRoustom) February 27, 2017 Last year was a record-breaking year for film and television production in Toronto.The city hit $2 billion in film, television and digital production in 2016, according to a press release from the City of Toronto.Domestic and foreign film, television, digital and commercial production investments in Toronto had a third record-setting year, and achieved the +$2-billion level for the first time. ($2.01-billion to be exact.) Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_img Facebook Login/Register With: In a statement posted to Twitter, Deadpool 2 star Ryan Reynolds said he was “heartbroken, shocked and devastated” by her death.Harris began riding in 2009 and received her race licence in May 2013. She started competing in 2014, racing in the American Sportbike Racing Association’s Championship Cup Series.In a 2015 profile published in Black Girls Ride Magazine, Harris was described as the first African-American woman to become a professional road racer.“Sounds like SJ is leading the pack in more ways than one,” the article concludes.READ MORE Advertisement Advertisement Twittercenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment SJ Harris died on Monday morning in Vancouver while shooting an action sequence for the film Deadpool 2. (SJ Harris/Instagram) Advertisement The American stunt rider who died in Vancouver on Monday while shooting an action sequence for the film Deadpool 2 has been identified as SJ Harris, a 40-year-old from New York City.Harris died after her motorcycle crashed through the window of the Starbucks in Shaw Tower, near Jack Poole Plaza.According to the BC Coroners Service, Harris’s family will issue a statement later today.Friend of stuntwoman SJ Harris says she ‘died doing what she loved’last_img read more

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first_imgOn Friday Rope made a public Facebook post about the vicious assault she experienced at the hands of Strongheart, along with a photo of her swollen, bruised face after she was released from hospital.A photo of Melanie Rope from 2010 just days after she says she was released from hospital after being viciously attacked by Strongheart in his Regina home. (Supplied)“He was threatening to kill me as he was beating me,” said Rope, recalling the night when she says Strongheart beat her in his Regina home after flying into a jealous rage. Rope says Strongheart was subsequently charged, convicted and sentenced on two counts of assault causing bodily harm. Advertisement Twitter New York-based actor Will Strongheart plays the supporting role of Virgil in the film Indian Horse. According to his bio on the film’s website he is a member of the Keeseekoose First Nation of Saskatchewan. (Elevation Pictures) Facebook Melanie Rope wants people to know about actor Will Strongheart’s history of violence against her and others, before making a choice about whether or not to see the movie Indian Horse.“It’s not about trying to take away from this movie, but maybe just giving people the option to think twice before before they go and see it,” said Rope, who is Nakoda woman from the Carry the Kettle Nakoda First Nation in Saskatchewan. She is currently a pre-social work student at the University of Regina and says she dated Strongheart for just under a year in 2009-2010.What Rope does want, is for people to know about Strongheart’s past and to discover how he was cast in such an important film.center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsNunavut covers one-fifth of Canada’s landmass, but if you get lost or have an accident, you may be on your own for quite some time.Considering Saturday’s plane crash in Resolute Bay, Nunavut, that topic is now, once again, at the forefront.APTN National News reporter Kent Driscoll tells an amazing story of survival and asks what would have happened if the armed forces were not there.last_img

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first_imgAPTN National NewsThe 2013 National Aboriginal Hockey Championships kicked off Wednesday in Kahnawake, Que.Some of the best 19 and under Aboriginal hockey players from all over the country are competing for the ultimate bragging rights.APTN’s Tom Fennario has the story.last_img

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first_img(The gateway to the voting booth for the AFN election for national chief. Photo Brandi Morin/APTN)APTN National news WINNIPEG — As chiefs began casting votes in the first ballot of the election for national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, no candidate appears to have a lock on the two regions with the largest number of possible votes: British Columbia and Ontario.AFN national chief candidates Perry Bellegarde, Ghislain Picard and Leon Jourdain, made the rounds Wednesday through the regional caucus rooms trying to sway votes to their side.It appeared that neither Ontario nor British Columbia chiefs nor proxies would be voting as a block in the first ballot. B.C. and Ontario are the two provinces with the most First Nation communities and the most possible votes.Six Nations Chief Ava Hill, whose community sits in Ontario, said she was voting for Picard after discussing the choices with her council.“He has integrity, he takes a stand,” said Hill. “It’s a question of who I can trust the most, and it’s him.”Mattagami First Nation Chief Walter Naveau, whose community is also in Ontario, said he was backing Bellegarde.“I believe he demonstrates through the years that he has strong leadership capacity and he has the ability to inspire a vision across the nations of Canada,” said Naveau.British Columbia chiefs and proxies also seem to be pulled between the Picard and Bellegarde camps.Clint Tuttle, proxy for Malahat Indian Band, said he was being directed to vote for Picard.“He is the one that will stick to his guns, he is not afraid to voice his opinion,” said Tuttle. “And like a couple of others from B.C. said, we don’t always agree with him, but he won’t back down.”Ed Hall, a proxy for Kwikwetlem First Nation, said he was being directed to vote for Bellegarde.“That was the feedback that the chief got from a council member after he got back from the BC AFN,” said Hall.Onion Lake Cree Nation Chief Wallace Fox wouldn’t say who he voted for, but hoped the next national chief respected the will of the treaty holders.“(Prime Minister Stephen) Harper only meets with the national chief,” said Fox, whose Cree nation is in Saskatchewan. “We are the treaty holders, not the AFN, and our people need to respect that, whoever gets elected.”There were about 432 registered chiefs and proxies at last count. Registration for voting ended at 11 a.m. local time.First ballot voting closes at 12 p.m. local time.@APTNNewslast_img read more

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first_imgDanielle Rochette APTN National News Part of daily life for Veronique Papatie saying this to her children.“Be careful watch your step,” she says.The warning is for her children, and the nine members of her household, to watch their step getting into the outhouse.“When we have to use the toilet, it’s here,” said Papatie. “Whether in the summer or the winter.”For electricity, her family counts on a small and noisy generator.There’s no running water in the house either – which complicates everything.But the situation doesn’t seem to discourage Papatie.With money from the province in 2010, she and renovated her house in Kitcisakik. “When I was a little girl, my dream was to have my own bedroom. Now as a parent, I am able to provide my children with their own bedroom as well,” she said.Since 2010, 44 homes have been renovated in the community thanks to groups of emergency architects who call themselves, The Frontier Foundation.And $1.5 million in provincial funding over five years since 2010.A cooperative, managed by the community, has also been created for workforce training and housing renovations.‘It’s great to see members of our comminuty get their houses renovated,” said Mélanie Deslauriers, the community’s project manager. “It brings pride and tranquility to a household because there’s less anxiety or concern for things like mold. Partition walls in the home can also help create intamicy and privacy. There has been a lot of positivity that has come from the renovations as well as the training now that people live in updated homes. ”In Sept. 2016, the Québec government responded to the cooperative’s request for more money by investing another $2 millions dollars to complete the renovation of 90 houses.“We have an agreement from last year up to 2020 for five years,” said Deslauriers. “We get about $400,000 per year which totals $2 million for renovations in the community. But we have to understand that the account will not be completed. We will still need to renovate houses after these 4 years.”Raised by his grand parents until the age of five, Charlie Papatie comes from a nomadic life.“A house wasn’t really essential for us before. We just went wherever and lived where we wanted to because it was our territory,” he said. “Today, we say we want an adequate home, so we can be comfortable in our house.”Now Charlie Papatie wants his house to be renovated soon.He said an adequate house is more than new windows, doors and walls – he wants running water, electricity and a sewage system.“A shower and toilet is what’s missing. That’s what the people in our community are always talking about it. they tell me they would like all those basic needs for their children,” he said.But those services might come at a cost to their connection to the land.Kitcisakik is unique.The community has always refused to become a reserve under the Indian Act.And while some Kitcisakik members endure and continue to hope for a better community – many young people are leaving.People like Vince Papatie, 32. He moved and is now living and working in Val d’Or.He has no plans to move back with his young daughter to a community without basic services.‘I don’t need to wake up at night to keep a fire going or walk 3 kilometers for water,” he said. ‘I didn’t like taking showers in a public place, we got sores on our feet. it wasn’t clean and or healthy. I deserve a house with a toilet, running water and a shower.”But Vince Papatie admits he’s loosing his culture, language and is experiencing an identity crisis by living away.When asked about returning to Kitcisakik if it had adequate services, he didn’t hesitate.‘I’d return in a heartbeat. that’s what I tell my colleagues at work. As soon it’s a real community, I’ll go back home, because it’s still my home,” he said.The community proposed a village where they can access their traditional territory and be recognized as the owners of the land.But in 2002, the federal government said no.The growing division within the community about the location of the village, and the insufficient investments to complete housing renovations by 2020 leaves the community’s young people with little hope to return to their home land in a near future.drochette@aptn.calast_img read more

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first_imgWINNIPEG – The agreement to restore rail service to the town of Churchill in northern Manitoba will include at least $117 million from the federal government.The federal funding consists of $74 million to help repair the damaged rail line and buy it, along with the town’s port, from Denver-based Omnitrax. Ottawa is also committing another $43 million over 10 years to subsidize operations of the rail line.“Repair work on the rail line has already begun … and every effort is being made to complete the work and restore rail service before winter sets in,” International Trade Diversification Minister Jim Carr said at a news conference Friday that offered few details on what others involved in the deal are putting up.The rail line is the only land link to the subarctic community of 900 people, known for its polar bear tourist season and port on the western shore of Hudson Bay.The line was washed out by flooding in the spring of 2017. Since then, goods and people have had to be flown in and prices for groceries and fuel have skyrocketed.The tourist economy was hit hard, and some residents left town.Two weeks ago, after months of negotiations, a consortium called Arctic Gateway Group hammered out a deal to buy the line and port from Omnitrax, which had said it was losing money on the service and could not afford tens of millions of dollars in necessary repairs.The consortium includes several northern communities, Toronto-based Fairfax Financial Holdings and AGT Food and Ingredients, a Regina-based supplier of pulses and food ingredients.Carr and consortium officials would not reveal Friday how much money the consortium partners are putting in — they referred to an unspecified pool of money — or how much money Omnitrax is being paid.Carr would also not say whether the federal government would put up more money if its annual subsidies are not enough to prevent losses.“You don’t talk about hypotheticals in this business.”The rail line was once government-owned, but a former Liberal government sold it to Omnitrax in 1997. The rail line suffered from high maintenance costs due to the vast boggy terrain it covers, and lost a key customer when the Conservative government in 2012 moved to end the Canadian Wheat Board monopoly on western wheat.Carr said the new ownership group, which includes a built-in customer base with AGT, will make the rail line viable.Fairfax’s president was equally confident the restored line and port has untapped opportunities to ship goods to and from other countries through the Arctic.“The Russians — we have roughly 50,000 people north of the Arctic circle, they have a million and a half people and I said, 20 per cent of their GDP (goes) through there,” Paul Rivett said.Churchill Mayor Mike Spence said the months that have passed without rail service have been hard on the town. But people from other parts of Canada reached out.“I had people sending food hampers … high school students sending cards and school supplies,” Spence said. “So we never felt alone.”last_img read more

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first_imgOTTAWA — A timeline of Canada Post job action:Between 1965 and 2005:-19 strikes, lockouts and walkouts-Workers legislated back to work in 1987, 1991 and 19972007:-No labour disruptions as CUPW strikes four-year deal with Canada Post2011:-48,000 Canada Post workers begin job action June 2 with rotating strikes-Canada Post locks out workers June 14, saying it can’t operate under constant threat-Conservative government tables back-to-work bill June 20; stoppage ends June 272016:-CUPW wins challenge of previous back-to-work legislation in the Ontario Superior Court-Union and management sign two-year contract Aug. 30 without new disruption2018:-Canada Post workers begin rotating strikes in different cities Oct. 22-Labour Minister Patty Hajdu tables back to work legislation Nov. 22-Canadian Union of Postal Workers vows to fight in court if bill passesThe Canadian Presslast_img read more

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first_imgAUSTIN, Texas — More than 40 state attorneys general have announced a $1.5 million settlement with The Neiman Marcus Group LLC over a data breach the Dallas-based retailer disclosed in January 2014.The breach exposed customer credit card data at 77 Neiman Marcus stores nationwide. Over a three-month period in 2013, about 370,000 Neiman Marcus credit cards were accessed by unknown third parties unlawfully, and at least 9,200 were used fraudulently.Under terms of the settlement announced Tuesday, Neiman Marcus agrees to maintain reasonable procedures to protect customers’ personal data and obtain an information security assessment and report from a third-party professional.The settlement involves 43 states and the District of Columbia.The Associated Presslast_img

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first_imgKenney has promised to fight Bill C-69 in court. He will also go to court to try to stop the federal government from imposing a carbon tax on Alberta once his UCP follows through next month on its promise to repeal the Alberta-made carbon levy.Kenney, a former federal cabinet minister under Stephen Harper, has said the mere existence of Trudeau in power threatens Alberta’s economic prospects and has said he will do whatever he can to see Trudeau defeated in the fall election.The fight is also personal. Almost a year ago, Kenney, in a newspaper interview, dismissed Trudeau as a dilettante and a lightweight.“I know Justin. He doesn’t have a clue what he’s doing. This guy is an empty trust-fund millionaire who has the political depth of a finger bowl,” Kenney said at the time. Kenney said Wednesday that the plan, for now, is to be positive.“We will begin with the path of diplomacy and try to find common ground,” he said.“We hope that we don’t need to use more forceful measures to assert Alberta’s vital economic interests.”Kenney also won the election on a promise to be more forceful with other provinces, saying that Albertans feel its neighbours are happy to share in the bounty of Alberta’s oil wealth while opposing measures like pipelines to help it grow.In Quebec, Premier Francois Legault congratulated Kenney on his electoral victory Wednesday but said all parties in Quebec’s legislature still oppose any new oil pipelines.Kenney said he also wants to start on a positive note with Legault, but added: “We don’t think it’s reasonable for other provinces, like Quebec, to take our equalization money while opposing pipeline projects that can help us pay the bills.”Kenney has said that the first day of his government will see him proclaim into law a bill passed by Notley’s legislature allowing Alberta to reduce oil flows to B.C. if B.C. continues to thwart the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline to take more Alberta oil to the West Coast.He said he plans to recall the legislature in the third week of May. Kenney said he and Trudeau will try to meet shortly after Kenney and his new United Conservative government are sworn in on April 30.It was a much anticipated conversation, given that Kenney successfully leveraged voter dissatisfaction with Trudeau in Alberta’s election, painting NDP Premier Rachel Notley as a weak enabler of federal energy policies he says are undermining its oil and gas sector.On Tuesday, Kenney’s United Conservatives won a strong majority government over Notley’s NDP, reducing core NDP support to mainly the city of Edmonton.Kenney and Notley have attacked the federal Liberals on proposed legislation, including a tanker ban on the northern B.C. coast and Bill C-69.Bill C-69, now before the Senate, creates new approval rules for energy projects, which Kenney calls an unconstitutional power grab on areas of provincial authority.The Kenney-Trudeau nexus is expected to play a pivotal role as the UCP work to implement its core campaign promise to create more jobs and grow the oil and gas sector.center_img EDMONTON, A.B. – Jason Kenney, Alberta’s incoming premier, said he cordially talked pipelines Wednesday with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau _ Kenney’s political nemesis and his election campaign pinata _ and said the plan is to meet soon for a one-on-one.“He called to offer his congratulations. We spoke for about 15 minutes,” Kenney said outside Alberta’s legislature building.“We had a respectful conversation about a number of issues, including the need to get Canadian energy to foreign markets.”last_img read more

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first_imgTAYLOR, B.C. – At a District of Taylor Council meeting, on Tuesday, Council passed the first two readings of a Bylaw that would allow for Micro Breweries, Craft Distilleries, and Cannabis Retail within the District.Earlier this year, the District had been contacted by local business investors that showed interest in developing a small scale craft brewery within the municipality.According to District Staff, after reviewing the District’s Zoning Bylaw, it was determined that the proposed use is not permitted in any of Taylor’s commercial zones. Based on the interest expressed by the proponents, Staff prepared a proposal of zoning by-law amendments which looked at allowing both breweries and the sale of cannabis.The Cannabis Retail amendments proposed to the District of Taylor’s Zoning Bylaw are modelled closely after those adopted by the City of Fort St John.Later this summer, the District will be holding a public hearing on these Bylaw amendments before being adopted.More information on the Bylaw amendments can be found on the District of Taylor’s website.last_img read more

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