March 2, 2021
  • 7:42 am Bankruptcy Judge Asks 50 Cent Why He Has Stacks Of Cash In Instagram Photos
  • 7:42 am George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, Meryl Streep & More Announced For Bernie Worrell Fundraiser
  • 7:41 am Mining the Deep End in Search of a Utopian Dream: Envision Festival 2016
  • 7:35 am Phish Sneaks Sally Through San Francisco For A Monday Night Jammer [Recap]
  • 7:34 am Spafford Adds Second Chicago Show Due To Popular Demand

first_imgGuns N’ Roses are set to kick off another leg of their reunion tour later this week, with Axl Rose, Slash, and Duff McKagan ready to dive in. The American rock band, who formed in 1987 and have had a rotating cast of characters since, have just announced a slew of additional American dates in October and November, including stops at Madison Square Garden in New York, Air Canada Centre in Toronto, Chicago’s United Center, and STAPLES Center in Los Angeles.The band has also added an impressive list of opening acts that will join them over the course of the tour. During their European dates, Guns N’ Roses will be supported by The Kills, Mark Lanegan, Royal Blood, Killing Joke, The Darkness, Wolfmother, and The Pretenders. In the United States, Guns N’ Roses will be joined by Deftones, Royal Blood, Live, ZZ Top, and Sturgill Simpon. GNR will also co-headline a pair of dates with The Who in Latin America.If you didn’t care to see Guns N’ Roses before, you might want to now!See below for Guns N’ Roses full schedule.Guns N’ Roses 2017 Tour Dates:05/27 – Dublin, IE @ Slane Castle ^#05/30 – Bilbao, ES @ San Mames Stadium #06/02 – Lisbon, PT @ Passeio Martimo De Alges #06/04 – Madrid, ES @ Vincente Calderon Stadium #06/07 – Zurich, CH @ Letzigrund @06/10 – Imola, IT @ Greenfield @06/13 – Munich, DE @ Olympiastadion !06/16 – London, UK @ London Stadium !06/17 – London, UK @ London Stadium !06/20 – Gdansk, PL @ Stadion Energy Gdansk ?06/22 – Hannover, DE @ Messe ?06/24 – Werchter, BE @ Classic %&06/27 – Copenhagen, DK @ Telia Parken ~06/29 – Stockholm, SE @ Friends Arena @07/01 – Hämeenlinna, FI @ Kantolan Tapahtumapuisto @07/04 – Prague, CZ @ Letnany Airport ~07/07 – Paris, FR @ Stade de France ~07/10 – Vienna, AT @ Ernst Happel Stadion &07/12 – Nijmegen, NL @ Goffert Park ~07/15 – Tel Aviv, IS @ Hayarkon Park07/27 – St. Louis, MO @ The Dome At America’s Center +07/30 – Minneapolis, MN @ U.S. Bank Stadium +08/02 – Denver, CO @ Sports Authority Field at Mile High \08/05 – Little Rock, AR @ War Memorial Stadium08/08 – Miami, FL @ Miami Marlins Stadium \08/11 – Winston-Salem, NC @ BB&T Field at Wake Forest University /08/13 – Hershey, PA @ Hersheypark Stadium /08/16 – Buffalo, NY @ New Era Field08/19 – Montreal, QC @ Parc Jean Drapeau {}08/21 – Ottawa, ON @ TD Place Stadium {}08/24 – Winnipeg, MB @ Investors Group Field {}08/27 – Regina, SK @ New Mosaic Stadium at Evraz Place08/30 – Edmonton, AB @ Commonwealth Stadium {}09/01 – Vancouver, BC @ BC Place Stadium ^09/03 – George, WA @ The Gorge ^09/06 – El Paso, TX @ Sun Bowl Stadium >09/08 – San Antonio, TX @ Alamodome >09/23 – Rio de Janerio, BR @ Rock in Rio *10/01 – Buenos Aires, AR @ Estadio Único De La Plata *10/08 – Philadelphia, PA @ Wells Fargo Center10/11 – New York, NY @ Madison Square Garden10/15 – New York, NY @ Madison Square Garden10/22 – Boston, MA @ TD Garden10/26 – Cleveland, OH @ Quicken Loans Arena10/29 – Toronto, ON @ Air Canada Centre11/02 – Detroit, MI @ Little Caesars Arena11/06 – Chicago, IL @ United Center11/10 – Houston, TX @ Toyota Center11/14 – Tulsa, OK @ BOK Center11/17 – Las Vegas, NV @ T-Mobile Arena11/21 – Oakland, CA @ Oracle Arena11/24 – Los Angeles, CA @ STAPLES Center11/25 – Los Angeles, CA @ STAPLES Center^ = w/ Royal Blood# = w/ Mark Lanegan@ = w/ The Darkness! = w/ The Kills? = w/ Killing Joke% = w/ The Pretenders& = w/ Wolfmother~ = w/ Biffy Clyro+ = w/ Deftones\ = w/ Sturgill Simpson/ = w/ Live{} = w/ Our Lady Peace> = w/ ZZ Top* = w/ The Wholast_img read more

READ MORE

first_img“If you can’t see it, you aren’t seeing it.ShareAs new security breaches come to light just about every day, nothing could be more obvious to even the casual observer…the security industry has failed you.  Traditional approaches to security are utterly obsolete in relation to today’s complex architectures and modern threats.  Our rapidly expanding attack surface, thanks to the digitization of business and adoption of Cloud and mobile technologies, combined with a threat environment that is increasingly complex and sophisticated, necessitates a new approach to security.Legacy strategies and technologies have defended organizations from cyber-attack by establishing a digital perimeter around enterprise networks – a supposed barrier that was tightly monitored and through which access was defined and controls applied.  While viewpoints vary as to how effective these barriers actually were, limiting the number of access points typically enabled a higher degree of scrutiny and perhaps confidence in the security of the network and its contents.But, even that facade of security has been perforated by mobile technologies, Cloud services, and new business practices.  The ever expanding number of access points and methods through which that digital perimeter might stretch or contort now out-strip even advanced concepts of perimeter defense. Only once you acknowledge that applying controls to and watching the perimeter is a very small subset of what is necessary, can you begin to take meaningful steps forward.While adopting a new approach to security – what we call Intelligence Driven Security – will require many steps forward, one of the first steps is expanding our visibility.  Now, when you say visibility to many security practitioners, they immediately start talking about the traditional visibility offered by firewalls and other logs, router telemetry, antivirus information and perhaps IDS alerts.  When the SIEM industry began, it promised better visibility, investigative power, and compliance efficiency, by bringing this information together.  While attractive on the surface, the reality has left way too much to be desired.Intelligence Driven Security requires a fundamentally different approach to visibility.  Technologies exist to record every single packet on the network and more importantly understand and interpret them as packets, sessions, and applications.  To find out what’s really occurring in your environment, you must augment the observations your security infrastructure is or isn’t making already with this deep visibility into the reality of how things actually are.  This deeper level of visibility will help against insertion, replay, fragmentation and application layer methods of bypassing the existing security enterprise.  Combine this deep visibility with insight into what might be occurring at the endpoint and it’s like turning the light on in room that had been pitch black or at best, dimly lit.Look at the news on a daily basis and see the organizations getting compromised, many with presumably strong security programs.  If security programs don’t expand their visibility and evolve to match the threats of today and tomorrow, however, it’s easy to see that these breaches are just the beginning.The key to cyber security’s migration to Intelligence Driven Security is visibility, analysis, and action.  This article is Part 1 of a 3-Part series which will discuss each migration.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img Related Shows First he wrote the best-selling book. Then came the Oscar-winning film. Now, with Riding the Midnight Express, comes a solo show performed by the man who lived it. Billy Hayes recounts his time in a Turkish prison and his harrowing escape. There will be a Q&A between Hayes and the audience following each performance. Hayes’ autobiographical book, Midnight Express, was released in 1977 and adapted into a film a year later, starring Brad Davis, Randy Quaid and John Hurt. It won the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay. Riding the Midnight Express previously played a limited engagement at St. Luke’s Theatre earlier this year. Tickets are now on sale to see Riding the Midnight Express With Billy Hayes off-Broadway. Directed by Jeffrey Altshuler, the production will begin previews on September 24 at the Barrow Street Theatre. Opening night is set for October 2. Riding the Midnight Express View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 28, 2014last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgBy Brooke Hatfield and Johnny HarrellUniversity of Georgia “Just because you can see the opening doesn’t necessarily meanthat the nest itself is right there,” Delaplane said. “It couldbe several feet away.” “And No. 2, there’s an increase in the levels of outdooractivities — picnics and tailgaters, for example. And when youput the two together, you have problems,” Delaplane said. Don’t stand around or swatDelaplane had one word of advice for anyone who happens upon ayellow jacket nest: “Run.” In search of proteinBut it’s not just human flesh these bugs are after.”Wasps are carnivores,” he said, “and they will seek out any kindof protein they can find. And very often, that’s a hamburger or ahot dog at someone’s picnic. Two major factors contribute to this phenomenon.”No. 1, the wasp colonies are now reaching their highestpopulation of the year,” said Delaplane, an extension serviceentomologist with the UGA College of Agriculture andEnvironmental Science. Standing still and swatting at the bugs is the worst thing youcan do, while the average person can outrun a wasp, he said.It’s usually best to leave a nest alone. But if you do try toeradicate a nest, Delaplane advises you to wear protectiveclothing, a veil and a complete body-covering suit. Many people associate autumn with a smaller number of insects.But yellow jackets and wasps are actually more aggressive duringthe fall, said University of Georgia scientist Keith Delaplane.center_img “It may be very satisfying to see some of them die, but it’s nota very practical approach,” Delaplane said. If you use insecticide to destroy the nest, he said, saturate thearea around the entrance to the nest.Hard to find underground nestsUnderground wasp nests are a bit harder to pinpoint. In those cases, insecticide sprayed down the hole could totallymiss the nest, and painful stings could result. “The fact that they’re carnivores isn’t necessarily bad. Thewasps eat garden caterpillars, saving gardeners from having toresort to pesticides,” he said. “They just don’t appear to be sobeneficial when it’s your picnic they’re interrupting. In thegrand scheme of things, they do contribute.” “Very often, people don’t do that, and they end up getting veryserious stings,” he said. Most yellow jackets and wasps die out in late fall, so eventuallythe problem goes away on its own.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享AL.com:Alabama Power Company announced Wednesday that it was permanently retiring the William Crawford Gorgas Electric Generating Plant in Walker County due to “federally driven environmental mandates.” The facility, usually just called Plant Gorgas, has generated electricity since 1917 on the banks of the Black Warrior River near the town of Parrish, and is currently operating three coal-fired units.A combination of stricter federal environmental laws, growing concerns about the legacy of coal ash ponds and low natural gas prices since the expansion of fracking techniques in the early 2010s have led to dramatic coal plant retirements in Alabama and across the country.Jim Heilbron, Alabama Power senior vice president and senior production officer, cited the environmental laws and coal ash concerns in a news release announcing the closure. Heilbron said in the news release that it could take an additional $300 million to operate the plant in compliance with the latest environmental mandates.Alabama Power spokesman Michael Sznajderman said that approximately 180 people are currently employed at Plant Gorgas, and that no layoffs are expected. He said some workers will continue on at the site “indefinitely” beyond the closure period and that the activities to close the coal ash pond at Gorgas will take “several years.” Sznajderman said other employees will have opportunities at other Alabama Power facilities, and some longtime employees may elect to retire.The Alabama Public Service Commission, the state government body charged with regulating Alabama Power and other utilities in the state, issued a statement blaming the closure on former President Barack Obama specifically, and liberals generally.After Gorgas’s three remaining coal units are retired, Alabama Power will be operating just seven coal-fired generating units at three plants across its entire fleet, down from 23 coal units at its peak. The other units have either been retired or converted to run on natural gas.More: Alabama Power to shutter coal plant, cites environmental laws Alabama utility to close Gorgas coal plant in Aprillast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgGoldman Sachs tightens fossil fuel financing policies, pledges billions for ‘climate transition’ FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:Goldman Sachs Group Inc. has tightened its policy on fossil fuel financing in a move welcomed by environmental groups, just as global talks on climate change faltered in Madrid over the weekend.The Wall Street firm’s recently updated environmental policy framework includes pledges to decline financing that directly supports new thermal coal mines and upstream Arctic oil exploration and development. The company is targeting $750 billion for “climate transition and inclusive growth finance” over the next decade, according to its website.An increasing number of global banks have been reducing their lending to the coal industry, a leading contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, and increasing financing for renewable energy.The Rainforest Action Network and the Sierra Club said that the revisions on fossil fuel financing make Goldman’s policy “now the strongest among the big six U.S. banks,” while still behind those of European lenders including Credit Agricole SA and BNP Paribas SA. The move to rule out Arctic oil projects marks “a crucial first step, among U.S. banks, on ending financing expansion of oil and gas,” the groups said in a joint statement.Chief Executive Officer David Solomon touted Goldman’s plans for more sustainable funding in an op-ed in the Financial Times. “Over the next 10 years, Goldman Sachs will target $750 billion of financing, investing and advisory activity to nine areas that focus on climate transition and inclusive growth,” he wrote. They include clean energy and transport, sustainable food and agriculture, and education.Goldman’s new policy also included pledges to: decline financing projects of new coal-fired power plants in developing nations ‒ a commitment that previously only applied to the U.S. and developed countries ‒ unless they have carbon capture and storage or equivalent emissions reduction technology [and] engage with thermal coal mining companies on their plans to diversify away from the fossil fuel, and phase out financing for any that don’t have such strategies “within a reasonable timeframe.” [Russell Ward]More: Goldman Sachs Curbs New Lending on Coal and Arctic Oillast_img read more

READ MORE
first_img October 1, 2000 Associate Editor Regular News Children’s panel turns to the experts Children’s panel turns to the experts Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Because of a zero tolerance policy against bringing weapons to school, a young child was tossed out for bringing an ax to class.Never mind that it was made of plastic and was part of his fireman uniform when he dressed up for Halloween.“I’m not making this up,” Robert Schwartz, executive director of The Juvenile Law Center in Philadelphia, told members of The Florida Bar’s Commission on the Legal Needs of Children, who let out a collective groan.“The school officials ended up apologizing,” Schwartz added. Not to the child or his parents, he said, but to the firefighters’ union that had protested the ax was a tool, not a weapon.Such zero tolerance policies popular in schools nationwide, he said, are bringing younger and younger kids into court, harming children and putting a tremendous strain on the juvenile justice system. He’s working on an American Bar Association resolution against them.Schwartz was one of 10 experts — including a law professor, a researcher, a public defender, a state attorney, a lawyer devoted to special education issues, and a teenager charged with armed robbery — who converged in Tampa on September 15-16 to enlighten the commission on issues affecting juvenile justice.The special commission, chaired by 11th Circuit Judge Sandy Karlan, is embarking on its second year, with a goal of working to solve the unmet legal needs of children who appear in Florida’s courtrooms — whether as victims, witnesses or defendants in civil, dependency or criminal court. After making a progress report to the Board of Governors, also meeting in Tampa in conjunction with the Bar’s General Meeting, Judge Karlan received its blessing to carry on.“We’re grateful to the Board of Governors and The Florida Bar for allowing us to have this commission and to do the work we’re doing,” Judge Karlan said, adding the commission’s goal is to have a report of recommendations to give to the Board of Governors by May.Bar President Herman Russomanno paid a personal visit, assuring commission members that the Bar is fully committed to their mission.“We thank this commission for the hard work you’ve done in the past year and for what you’ll be doing this coming year for the legal needs of children,” Russomanno said.“The Bar has made it its policy that our children are our greatest resource. With your work, if you can give some of these children back their childhood, we will accomplish great things together.”No matter how many advanced degrees a speaker possessed, how thorough their research, how impressive their resumes, or how many years they spent on the front-lines of juvenile justice, their recommendations often came down to good old common sense on how to fix a system that often seems to ignore common sense:“If you educate people, you reduce recidivism. It’s common sense,” said Joseph Tulman, professor at the University of District of Columbia, David A. Clark School of Law, who is also on the faculty of the National Judicial College teaching judges how to deal with children in adult court.“Duh! If we help people become productive, it will help the kid and the community and save money,” Tulman said of activities all children need to define themselves as individuals — whether it’s music, art or sports — the very things that are cut out first in programs for kids.“We all know that if we get someone sober and educated, and give them vocational skills and a job, we’re not going to see him in the juvenile justice system again. Those are the odds,” said Sixth Judicial Circuit Public Defender Bob Dillinger, describing his circuit’s comprehensive “one-stop shopping” of services at the Juvenile Assessment Center.“I don’t care what side you come down on, put money in children ages zero to 18. If you’re the toughest prosecutor in the world, it makes sense. Most state attorneys agree, but then they go back home and talk about quicker death penalties to get re-elected,” said Fourth Judicial Circuit State Attorney Harry Shorstein.“It’s crazy that kids from Miami are doing their time in the Panhandle,” said Francisco Alarcon, deputy secretary of the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice. He shared his frustration that while he has funds to build more therapeutic foster homes where they’re most needed in South Florida, he is unable to use sites the state already owns because of the NIMBY (Not in My Back Yard) factor.“You can’t help kids without helping their families. We love poor kids, but we tend to hate their families.. . It sounds mushy and not professional, but it comes down to: What do we need for this kid? What will work? Piece together a plan that’s best for the kid and watch it. If it’s not working, try something else,” said Ira Burnim, legal director of the Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law in Washington, D.C.He stressed that what works best are intensive services to kids and their families in their homes, not confining kids in residential treatment facilities and then sending them back to the environment from which they came with no support. The adults who best know the child, including teachers and family members, need to be at the table with social workers and lawyers to create the best plan for the child.“Many parents have to give up custody of their kids to get them services,” said Burnim, of the dilemma that Medicaid is the biggest resource to pay for mental health services and no one has the right to mental health services.“Our nation locks up 105,000 children a day,” said Richard Mendel, who served as director of research and public policy for The South Bronx Overall Economic Development Corp. “Yet only 5,000 children are treated in home-based multisystemic functional family therapy.”That’s the name of intensive family-oriented, home-based counseling services that research has shown works best to help juveniles and was endorsed by the U.S. Surgeon General in his 1999 report to the nation on mental health.“Isn’t it odd that criminal court is the only way to get help for kids? It’s an odd notion to have to resort to jail to get help for kids,” said Schwartz, of Philadelphia’s The Juvenile Law Center, in response to Shorstein’s program in the Duval County Jail for juveniles he direct files as adults in order to give them comprehensive counseling and education services.Much of the discussion centered on the fact that Florida leads the nation in direct filing juveniles to adult criminal court.“Florida direct files more children than the rest of the states combined,” said Dillinger, the public defender. “Put a 16- or 17-year-old in adult prison and you’ve lost him. Might as well write him off.”Dillinger criticized the defense bar — including inexperienced assistant public defenders — for not giving judges more information to work with when the child first enters the court system. It’s not unusual, he said, for lawyers to first meet their child clients the morning of the court appearance.He also called it a “bothersome fact” that a lot of children going through the court system are not represented by a lawyer at all.“Some are not incompetent — they’re insane,” Dillinger said. “More and more are waiving their right to counsel.” Go to Jail for Help Though many agreed it’s a sad commentary that the best way to deliver services to children charged with crimes is to lock them up in the county jail, Shorstein was warmly received for his innovative program that direct files juveniles into adult court so that he can help them behind bars. Shorstein’s program — a combination of punishment, constructive programming and after care — was created in response to Jacksonville’s juvenile crime problem that skyrocketed 27 percent in 1992. It has received international attention and was featured on “60 Minutes.”“We decided to turn everything upside down and make juvenile crime our No. 1 issue,” Shorstein said. The violent repeat juveniles are sent to adult prison, but the ones with hope of turning around are sent to a special section of the Duval County Jail, where they receive everything from schooling to mentoring to counseling. When their time behind bars is up, adjudication is withheld, so they’re not branded convicted felons, and after-care counseling and foster care for those with no safe home to return to is provided.Despite the accolades Shorstein’s program has received and the statistics that juvenile crime in Jacksonville is down, Delbert Elliott, the director of The Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence at the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado in Boulder, said research has shown that, in general, waivers to adult court do not work. They don’t help children and they don’t reduce crime, he said.Juveniles in adult prisons are at greater risk of becoming victims, they are less likely to get treatment for their problems, and recidivism is higher once the young people come out of adult prison, Elliott said. In addition, research has shown that the practice is rife with racial bias because more African-American children are direct-filed as adults than whites for the same crimes, he said.“We have states who have lowered the age to 10 to direct file,” Elliott said.Mendel, a researcher and consultant who wrote, “Less Hype, More Help: Reducing Juvenile Crime, What Works — and What Doesn’t,” stressed: “Kids are fundamentally different than adults. They break the law for different reasons than adults. They need a different system of justice.”While 45 states have adopted the get-tough philosophy, “Adult time for adult crime,” Florida is the leader in direct filing juveniles to adult court. Unlike other states that give the discretion to judges, Mendel said, Florida puts the decision in the wrong hands by allowing prosecutors to make that call.“This headlong rush to throw kids into adult prison is counterproductive,” Mendel said. “It actually increases criminality.”While Florida was first to seize upon direct filing, Mendel said, Florida is second in the nation in juvenile crime rates.To make matters worse, Mendel said, research has shown that direct-file practices actually punish the wrong kids. It’s mostly used against juveniles who commit property crimes and drug offenses, not violent or chronic offenders, he said.Nineteen-year-old Jason Bond brought his been-there, done-that testimony to the commission. As a 16-year-old, he was charged with his first crime: armed robbery. The prosecutor wanted to direct file him to adult court. Thanks to his guardian ad litem, Fran Feinberg, and family support, Bond was spared a trip to adult prison. Instead, he was sent to an out-of-state juvenile facility that was run like a strict prep school. The intense no-nonsense personal attention turned him around, said Bond, who is now attending Broward-Dade Community College and hopes to attend Florida International University on a track scholarship.“Kids being direct-filed, they’re not given a chance, in my opinion,” Bond said, describing himself as falling in with the wrong crowd in a public school system where “no one knew my name. I lost myself there.” How Would Oliver Twist Be Treated Today? Schwartz, of Philadelphia’s The Juvenile Law Center, said the child-versus-adult question is “the most troubling question. That’s a Florida question par excellence, given the direct-file numbers.”The underlying question, Schwartz said, is: What kind of kid are we talking about? Children have traditionally been broken down into the categories of Bad (send to juvenile justice); Sad (let child welfare workers handle); Mad (get the kid to mental-health treatment); and Can’t Add (needs special education services).“The case I love to talk about is Oliver Twist. He was a member of a street gang. But Charles Dickens portrayed him as more sad than bad. How would Oliver be treated today? Direct-filed as an adult?,” Schwartz asked.He called it a “disturbing trend” that the country is “using criminal law to respond to normal adolescent development.” For example, in Florida, it’s an offense for teens to smoke cigarettes. And nationwide, more and more first- and second-graders are making headlines when they’re charged with crimes.One of Schwartz’ biggest recommendations is that the dependency judge, who knows the child and family problems best, retain jurisdiction if that child is also charged with a crime.He gave the example of a child who was seriously emotionally disturbed, whose parents were both dead. When taken to a school for special testing, he snapped and trashed the classroom. Once he was adjudicated guilty of a crime, he couldn’t go back to his residential treatment home.“There ought to be a way the dependency judge can come back and say to the delinquency judge: `That kid is mine, not yours,’” Schwartz said. “I’d love it if the judges in dependency cases could retain jurisdiction if the child is arrested over county lines, so the judge who knows the kid can keep the case.. . . “We’re seeing it left and right, where children hit their foster parents and are charged with a crime. Our child welfare agencies can’t wait to close cases and send it to the Department of Juvenile Justice.”As a member of the American Bar Association’s Criminal Justice Section, Schwartz is working on a resolution to oppose zero tolerance policies in schools because it operates with the rigidity of a mandatory sentence.“If The Florida Bar could support it, that’d be great,” he said.Barbara Burch, the education attorney for the Juvenile Advocacy Project of the Legal Aid Society of Palm Beach County, said, “I have an 11-year-old client with five felonies for batteries on school board employees (for acting out in class). If this kid does something at age 15, he’ll be direct-filed to adult court.”Her biggest wish is that Florida provide surrogate parents to children with special education needs — who can serve as “the one adult who knows what’s going on and can advocate for children.”She also issued a hue and cry for more attorneys to focus on special education advocacy, adding that federal law for Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) cases provide for paying attorneys’ fees at market rates.“We don’t have the number of attorneys to do this. We need to get the bar involved.”Tulman, the Washington law professor, trained 100 lawyers to handle special-education advocacy cases, including class-action lawsuits.“Eighty to 90 percent of kids locked up in your facilities qualify as educationally disabled,” Tulman said. “It’s a phenomenal number.”Stressing that getting parents involved to help children receive the services they are entitled to under IDEA (Title II of Americans with Disabilities Act) is a sure-fire way to help children with education disabilities.“We can do remarkable stuff to stabilize families by getting special education services,” he said.And while no state in the nation is in compliance with the IDEA, he said, special education law is a powerful incentive for schools to provide services, rather than pay attorneys.Ideally, Tulman said, there would be a way to better help children by getting various agencies to sit together and shift funds from multiple pools of budgets.Now, too often, he said, agencies would rather shift the kid to become some other agency’s problem.last_img
READ MORE

first_imgBoard endorses six sets of procedural rules January 15, 2004 Regular News Board endorses six sets of procedural rulescenter_img The Board of Governors has endorsed six sets of procedural rule amendments and forwarded a seventh without comment to the Supreme Court.Under revised rule procedures, the rule committees now make recommendations every other year to update their respective rules, with the submissions being staggered over two years.The board at its December meeting handled five regular rule requests, plus an emergency rule amendment from the Rules of Judicial Administration Committee.The board took no action on rule amendments proposed by the Workers’ Compensation Rules Committee. Bar President Miles McGrane noted that the Division of Administrative Hearings has contended that under revised state laws, the committee and the Supreme Court no longer have jurisdiction to make procedural rules for workers’ compensation cases and that DOAH now has exclusive authority to implement rules.Consequently, McGrane said the board would not review those rules, but would merely pass them along to the court, which will ultimately decide the issue.The board does not have the authority to alter the recommendations from the committees, but it does make its own suggestions that the court adopt, reject, or modify the committees’ proposals.In December, the board added its endorsement to all of the committees’ recommended amendments. Here’s a quick look at what is being proposed: T he Rules of Judicial Administration Committee presented an amendment to the judicial disqualification rule, Rule 2.160, in order to define the word “immediately.” The rule currently says a judge shall rule immediately on a disqualification motion and the amendment, drafted in response to a request from the Supreme Court, says that ruling in no case shall come more than 30 days after the motion is filed.The Criminal Procedure Rules Committee approved several changes, many based on recent laws or court rulings. An amendment to Rule 3.710 would provide a court order that a comprehensive presentence investigation report be placed on the record when a defendant refuses to present mitigating evidence in a death penalty case. That conforms to Muhammad v. State, 782 So. 2d 343 (Fla. 2001).New Rule 3.575 was proposed to create a procedure for interviewing jurors after a conviction pursuant to Defrancisco v. State, 830 So. 2d 131 (Fla. 2d DCA) and Rule Regulating The Florida Bar 4-3.5(d)(4).The committee also proposed adding Rule 3.150(c) to require a judge to inquire when two or more defendants are represented by the same lawyer or law firm and to advise the defendants they are entitled to effective representation of counsel, including separate lawyers.The Code and Rules of Evidence Committee has a different function from other rules committees, because the law of evidence is established by the legislature rather than by the Supreme Court. The committee acts to codify the rules to comply with recently passed statutes.This year’s changes included extending the sexual assault counselor-victim privilege to trained volunteers at crisis centers, creating a business records certification procedure so the records custodian does not have to appear at trial, and specifying that an objection does not have to be made at trial to preserve an evidentiary issue for appeal when the judge made a pretrial ruling on that issue.The most significant change proposed by the Juvenile Court Rules Committee, according to Chair Jennifer Parker, is that juveniles be given a meaningful opportunity to meet with a lawyer before they waive the right to counsel. Also, the waiver must be submitted in writing and in the presence of a parent or guardian. Both of those recommendations are in accordance with recommendations of the Bar’s Commission on the Legal Needs of Children.Other juvenile rule changes include a new Rule 8.257 on the use of general masters in dependency proceedings to comply with the Supreme Court’s request in Amendments to Florida Rules of Juvenile Procedure, 827 So. 2d 219 (Fla. 2002).An amendment to Rule 8.400 clarifies the procedure for amending a case plan while a change to Rule 8.410(c) changes the case plan goal from reunification to permanency for the child, to conform with state law.Several other amendments were also made to conform the rules with recent changes to F.S. Chapter 39.The Traffic Court Rules Committee suggested two changes. One was editorial to add titles to the major rule subdivisions. The second made a change to Rule 6.292 on criminal offenses to conform it with Rule 6.560 on the effect of a withheld adjudication in traffic infractions.The Appellate Court Rules Committee recommended changes to Rule 9.020 to provide that subdivision (h) on tolling rendition applies to trial orders only. The committee also proposed a new subdivision (i) to govern the rendition of appellate orders and the interaction of motions under Rules 9.330 and 9.331 and the finality of appellate orders.Another proposed amendment is to Rule 9.130 to restore the right of interlocutory appeals in cases covered by the Bert Harris Act, F.S. 70.001(6)(a). The change allows an interlocutory review of a ruling that a property has been inordinately burdened. Subdivision (a)(5) would also be changed to allow appeals from orders on motions for relief from judgment filed under Juvenile Procedure Rule 8.270.The committee also recommended changing Rule 9.370 to comply with the request of the Supreme Court in Amendments to Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure, 827 So. 2d 888 (Fla. 2002, to require an amicus to get leave of the court before filing an amicus brief. The change also provides that getting that leave is the only way to file those briefs, and the motion seeking leave must specify whether the parties agree to the filing.Another change would be to Rule 9.180 which would allow a filing of a notice of appeal if a judge of compensation claims fails to enter written findings despite a timely request. It also provides that the district court will relinquish jurisdiction with the entry of written findings.All of the amendments will now be submitted to the Supreme Court for its review. Copies of all the proposed amendments can be found at the Bar’s Web site, www.flabar.org.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgApple has asked iOS developers to provide details about the user data their apps and app updates collect. Apple had first announced this mandatory requirement during the iOS 14 unveil at WWDC earlier this year. The developers will have to offer information on the type of data it collects and App Store listings will label this information to help users understand an app’s privacy practices before they download it on any Apple platform. While the iOS 14 release did not see these changes taking effect, the “labels” are expected to show up on App Store listings sometime later this year.Apple’s Developer site has been updated to mention that developers will have to submit data tracking information for new apps and app updates to the App Store starting December 8. Once these labels go live, each app’s product page will have information about “some of the data types the app may collect and whether that data is linked to them or used to track them”.- Advertisement – Are iPhone 12 mini, HomePod mini the Perfect Apple Devices for India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. “You’ll need to provide information about your app’s privacy practices, including the practices of third-party partners whose code you integrate into your app, in App Store Connect. This information will be required [in order] to submit new apps and app updates to the App Store starting December 8, 2020,” the Cupertino giant has cautioned developers.There are no details on exactly when these labels will go live on the App Store, but Apple mentions that the App Store will help users understand an app’s privacy practices by “later this year”. Developers will have to answer app privacy questions in App Store Connect. The developers will be presented with multiple options and they will have to select suitable answers from there. Apple has asked iOS developers to disclose all of the data “you or your third-party partners collect”, and has duly warned them that they will be “responsible for keeping responses accurate and up to date”.To help developers further, Apple has mentioned a few criteria where data types is optional to disclose, and all this is mentioned on the Apple Developers site.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img71 Tristania Rd, Chapel Hill.This Chapel Hill mansion is like living in a resort.A championship-sized tennis court, a cinema, a swimming pool and two large sandpits – the list keeps on rolling.And the home at 71 Tristania Rd, Chapel Hill has plenty of room to accommodate friends and family with six bedrooms and five bathrooms.Owners Dr Margaret Davison, a general practitioner, and husband Malcolm, a cardiologist (pictured), have lived at the six-bedroom, five-bathroom home for the past 19 years.Homeowners Margaret and Malcolm Davison at Tristania Rd, Chapel Hill. Picture: AAP/David ClarkThe couple who have four children – the youngest are twins – said it was time to move.Dr Margaret Davison said it was her children who were keen on the move.“I am absolutely so sad to leave,” she said. “The children are older now and being closer to Bayside is a possibility for us as my husband loves to sail.”71 Tristania Rd, Chapel Hill.The four-level home has parklike gardens and it’s no wonder the Davison children have never been bored.“This property is very family orientated,” Dr Davison said.“It really is a kids’ haven.”With a basketball court, two gigantic sandpits and swings, she said the property was suitable for children of all ages. “We’ve had about 60 kids in the pool at one time,” she said.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investorless than 1 hour ago71 Tristania Rd, Chapel Hill.“The kids can sit under the fountains, and our children learnt to swim in the pool here.” The property, on 1.04ha, provides plenty of separation for parents and children.“When the children have their friends over, we can sit on the balcony and keep an eye on them,” Dr Davison said.71 Tristania Rd, Chapel Hill.She said even though she didn’t drink, the home had a pretty impressive wine cellar. It also had a guest suite.“We have family come stay with us all the time,” she said.“The house is well used.”Dr Davison described the home as being similar to a chameleon.“We have had every sort of party imaginable here,” she said.71 Tristania Rd, Chapel Hill.“There’s been up to 150 people at one of our parties here once. We’ve had intimate parties, wedding anniversaries, Halloween, you name it.”When the Davisons bought the home they added their own personal touches to the property.“We added the pool and tennis court,” she said. “Inside, we renovated the master room, all the kids’ bedrooms, bathrooms, and downstairs we did the guest suite.”McGrath Estate Agents – Paddington joint selling agent Reuben Packer-Hill said: “Surrounded by multimillion-dollar properties, Tristania Rd is a highly desirable precinct for buyers searching premium acreage in Brisbane’sinner-west”.The home is listed for sale through Alex Jordan and Reuben Packer-Hill of McGrath Estate Agents.last_img read more

READ MORE