March 2, 2021
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first_img Related Why run unless something is chasing you? Your shoes were made for walking. And that may be the problem The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. A groundbreaking researcher in running turns his attention to walking, with and without shoes Excerpted from “Exercised: Why Something We Never Evolved to Do is Healthy and Rewarding” by Daniel E. LiebermanAlmost all Americans know that exercise promotes health and think they should exercise, yet 50 percent of adults and 73 percent of high school students report they don’t meet minimal levels of physical activity, and 70 percent of adults report they never exercise in their leisure time, according to a 2018 survey by the U.S. government.Can an evolutionary anthropological approach help us do better?If we evolved to be physically active because it was either necessary or fun, then isn’t the solution to make exercise necessary and fun?Everyone copes with the urge to postpone or avoid exercise, so environments that neither require nor facilitate physical activity inevitably promote inactivity. If I have to choose between sitting comfortably in a chair or slogging through a sweaty workout, the chair is almost always more appealing.To find ways to overcome natural disinclinations to exercise, hundreds of experiments have tested an exhaustive list of interventions designed to entice non-exercisers to get moving. Some studies evaluate the effect of giving people information. This can involve lectures, websites, videos, and pamphlets about how and why to exercise, or providing devices like Fitbits so subjects know how much activity they are getting. Other experiments try to influence people’s behaviors. These studies include having doctors prescribe specific doses of exercise, providing free gym memberships, paying people to exercise, fining them for not exercising, boosting their confidence, or pestering them with phone calls, texts, and emails. Finally, some studies try to encourage people to exercise by altering their environments. Examples include funneling people toward stairs instead of elevators and building sidewalks and bicycle paths. You name it, someone’s tried it.The good news is that some of these interventions can and do make a difference. A typical example is a 2003 study that enrolled about 900 sedentary New Zealanders between the ages of 40 and 79. Half of them received normal medical care, but the other half were prescribed exercise by doctors, followed up by three phone calls over three months plus quarterly mailings from exercise specialists. After a year, the individuals prescribed exercise averaged 34 minutes of more physical activity per week than the standard care controls.The bad news is that big successes are the exception rather than the rule. While the extra 34 weekly minutes achieved by those New Zealanders is progress, all that extra effort amounted to only five more minutes of physical activity per day. Comprehensive reviews that have examined hundreds of high-quality studies find that many interventions fail, and those that succeed tend to have only similarly modest effects. There is no surefire way to persuade or coax non-exercisers to exercise substantially.But didn’t we already know that? If there were an effective, dependable way to transform sedentary people into regular exercisers, it would spread like wildfire. Why aren’t any of these interventions more likely to succeed than our generally ill-fated New Year’s resolutions?One reason is the complexity and variety of human nature. Even among westernized, industrialized populations, people are dazzlingly diverse in terms of psychology, culture, and biology. Why would a strategy that works on a college student in Los Angeles succeed for an elderly woman in London or a time-stressed parent in the suburbs of Tokyo? Do we really expect the same action plan to work for people who are overweight or thin, insecure or confident, men or women, college graduates or less educated, rich or poor? Indeed, studies that try to figure out who does and doesn’t regularly exercise find few factors common to exercisers apart from some really obvious ones: having a prior history of exercising, being healthy and not overweight, having confidence in the ability to exercise, being more educated, and both liking and wanting to exercise. That list of attributes is about as illuminating as figuring out that people who go to art museums tend to be people who like art.In my opinion, if we want to promote exercise effectively, we need to grapple with the problem that engaging in voluntary physical activity for the sake of health and fitness is a bizarre, modern, and optional behavior. Like it or not, little voices in our brains help us avoid physical activity when it is neither necessary nor fun. So let’s reconsider both of these qualities from an evolutionary anthropological perspective.First, necessity. Everyone, including the billion or so humans who regularly don’t get enough exercise, knows that more exercise would be good for them. Many of these non-exercisers feel frustrated or bad about themselves, and annoying exercisers who nag and brag about their efforts rarely improve matters by reminding them to jog, take long walks, go to the gym, and take the stairs. Part of the problem is the distinction between “should” and “need.” I know I should exercise to increase the probability I will be healthier, happier, and live longer with less disability, but there are numerous, legitimate reasons I don’t need to exercise.In fact, it is patently obvious one can lead a reasonably healthy life without exercise. As the Donald Trumps of the world attest, the 50 percent of Americans who get little to no exercise aren’t doomed to keeling over prematurely. To be sure, insufficient exercise increases their chances of getting heart disease, diabetes, and other illnesses, but most of these diseases tend not to develop until middle age, and then they are often treatable to some degree. Even though more than 50 percent of Americans rarely if ever exercise, the country’s average life expectancy is about 80 years.Not only is exercise inherently unnecessary, the modern mechanized world has eliminated other formerly necessary forms of non-exercise physical activity. I can easily spend my days without ever having to elevate my heart rate or break a sweat. I can drive to work, take an elevator to my office floor, spend the day in a chair, buy food, make meals, and wash clothes with little effort.In addition to being unnecessary, exercise takes precious time, keeping us from other, higher-priority activities. Many people have to commute long distances to work to sedentary office jobs fixed in terms of hours, and they have other time-consuming obligations including child care and elder care. Paradoxically, for the first time in history, wealthier people get more physical activity than the working poor. When free time is scarce, optional activities like exercise are relegated to weekends, and by then a week’s worth of accumulated fatigue can make it hard to muster the energy. When people are asked what keeps them from exercising, they almost always list time as a main barrier.Which brings up fun. Lack of time can be stressful, but even the busiest people I know manage to find time to do things they enjoy or find rewarding like watch TV, surf the web, or gossip. I suspect millions of non-exercisers would succeed in making exercise a greater priority if they found it more enjoyable, but for them exercise is often emotionally unrewarding and physically unpleasant. These negative reactions are probably ancient adaptations. Like most organisms, we have been selected to enjoy and desire sex, eating, and other behaviors that benefit our reproductive success and to dislike behaviors like fasting that don’t help us have more babies. If our Stone Age ancestors found unnecessary physical activities like optional five-mile jogs unpleasant, they would have avoided squandering limited energy that could have been allocated toward reproduction.That may be a “just-so story,” but few would disagree that non-exercisers are not entirely irrational because exercise is a modern behavior that is by definition unnecessary and often unpleasant. For many, it is also inconvenient and inaccessible. If we can’t make exercise necessary and fun, perhaps we can make it more necessary and more fun.The least fun exercise experience I ever had was the 2018 Boston Marathon. Boston weather at the end of April is sometimes nice, sometimes chilly, sometimes warm, or sometimes rainy, but the nor’easter that battered Boston that day was unusually brutal. By 10:00 a.m., when the race began, it had been pouring steadily for hours, the temperature was a few degrees above freezing, and there was a fierce headwind that gusted up to 35 miles per hour.The next 26.2 miles were horrid. My primary urge on crossing the finish line was to crawl into bed as fast as possible to warm up, which is exactly what I did.Over the next few days as I recovered physically and mentally, I thought about why I and 25,000 other lunatics ran through that storm. If my goal was simply to run 26.2 miles, I could have waited until the next day and enjoyed nearly perfect weather. The only explanation I can give is that I ran for social reasons. Like a soldier in battle, I wasn’t alone but instead part of a collective doing something difficult together. Peer pressure is a powerful motivator.And therein lies an important lesson about why we exercise. Because exercise by definition isn’t necessary, we mostly do it for emotional or physical rewards, and on that horrid April day in 2018, the only rewards were emotional — all stemming from the event’s social nature. For the last few million years humans rarely engaged in hours of moderate to vigorous exertion alone. When hunter-gatherer women forage, they usually go in groups, gossiping and enjoying each other’s company as they go. Men often travel in parties of two or more when they hunt or collect honey. Farmers work in teams when they plow, plant, weed, and harvest. So when friends or CrossFitters work out together in the gym, teams play a friendly game of soccer, or several people chat for mile after mile as they walk or run, they are continuing a long tradition of social physical activity.I think there is a deeper evolutionary explanation for why almost every book, website, article, and podcast on how to encourage exercise advises doing it in a group. Humans are intensely social creatures, and more than any other species we cooperate with unrelated strangers. We used to hunt and gather together, and we still share food, shelter, and other resources; we help raise one another’s children; we fight together; we play together. As a result, we have been selected to enjoy doing activities in groups, to assist one another, and to care what others think of us. Physical activities like exercise are no exception.Of course, exercise is also sometimes enjoyable without socializing. A solitary walk or run can be meditative, and working out while listening to podcasts or watching TV in the gym (a distinctly modern phenomenon) can be diverting. But for most people exercising with others is more emotionally rewarding. For this reason, sports, games, dancing, and other types of play are among the most popular social activities, and regular exercisers often belong to clubs, teams, and gyms.Exercise can also make us feel good, which helps make it enjoyable. After a good workout I feel simultaneously alert, euphoric, tranquil, and free from pain — not unlike taking an opioid. Actually, natural selection did adopt this drug-pushing strategy by having our brains manufacture an impressive cocktail of mood-altering pharmaceuticals in response to physical activity. The four most important of these endogenous drugs are dopamine, serotonin, endorphins, and endocannabinoids, but in a classic evolutionary design flaw these primarily reward people who are already physically active.While these and other chemicals released by exercise help us exercise, their drawback is they mostly function through virtuous cycles. When we do something like walk or run six miles, we produce dopamine, serotonin, and other chemicals that make us feel good and more likely to do it again. When we are sedentary, however, a vicious cycle ensues. As we become more out of shape, our brains become less able to reward us for exercising. It’s a classic mismatch: Because few of our ancestors were physically inactive and unfit, the brain’s hedonic response to exercise never evolved to work well in persistently sedentary individuals.So what should we as a society and you and I as individuals do? How can we make exercise more fun and rewarding, especially if we are out of shape?Commonly recommended, sensible methods to make exercise more fun (or less unfun) include:Be social: exercise with friends, a group, or a good, qualified trainer.Entertain yourself: listen to music, podcasts, or books, or watch a movie.Exercise outside in a beautiful environment.Dance or play sports and games.Because variety is enjoyable, experiment and mix things up.Choose realistic goals based on time, not performance, so you don’t set yourself up for disappointment.Reward yourself for exercising.Second, if you are struggling to exercise, it is useful to remember how and why exercising takes time to become enjoyable or less unpleasant. Because we never evolved to be inactive and out of shape, the adaptations that make physical activity feel rewarding and become a habit develop only after the several months of effort it takes to improve fitness. Slowly and gradually, exercise switches from being a negative feedback loop in which discomfort and lack of reward inhibit us from exercising again to being a positive feedback loop in which exercise becomes satisfying.So, yes, exercise can become more rewarding and fun. But let’s not deceive ourselves or others. No matter what we do to make exercise more enjoyable, the prospect of exercising usually seems less desirable and less comfortable than staying put. To overcome my inertia, I usually have to figure out how to make it seem necessary. The most acceptable way to do that is to find ways of coercing ourselves through agreed-upon nudges and shoves.Nudges influence our behaviors without force, without limiting our choices, and without shifting our economic incentives. Typical nudges involve changing default options (like opting out of being an organ donor instead of opting in) or small changes to the environment (like placing healthier foods prominently at the front of the salad bar). Predictably, many would-be exercisers are advised to try various nudges to make the act of choosing exercise more of a default, simpler, and less of a hassle. Examples include:Put out your exercise clothes the night before you exercise so you wear them first thing in the morning and are ready to go (alternatively, sleep in your exercise clothes).Schedule exercise so it becomes a default.Use a friend or an app to remind you to exercise.Make the stairs more convenient than taking the elevator or escalator.Shoves are more drastic forms of self-coercion. They are unobjectionable because you do them to yourself voluntarily, but they are more forceful than nudges. Examples include:Scheduling exercise with a friend or a group beforehand. You then become socially obligated to show up.Exercising in a group such as a CrossFit class. If you waver, the group will keep you going.Signing a commitment contract with an organization like StickK.com that sends money to an organization you dislike if you don’t exercise (a stick) or to one you like if you do (a carrot).Signing up (and paying) for a race or some other event that requires you to train.Posting your exercise online so others see what you are (or are not) doing.Designating a friend, a relative, or someone you admire or fear as a referee to check up on your progress.Note that all of these methods share one essential quality: They involve social commitment. Whether you plan to exercise with a friend, a yoga class, a team, a platoon of walkers and runners in a 5K event or report your exercise accomplishments (or lack thereof) online, you are pledging to others that you will be physically active. In return you get both carrots in the form of encouragement and support and sticks in the form of shame or disapprobation. In short, we all need nudges.“Exercised” by Daniel E. Lieberman is published by Pantheon Books, an imprint of the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House LLC. Copyright (c) 2020 by Daniel E. Lieberman.  Leave those calluses alone Upward curve at tip eases motion but may lead to weaker muscles, problems Exercise is something humans never evolved to do (but is healthy nonetheless) last_img read more

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first_img The Honduran Government declared a state of “emergency with regard to public safety” on December 5, in order to authorize military personnel to support the police for 90 days. In the absence of President Porfirio Lobo, who travelled to the Tuxtla Group summit in Mexico, the Council of Ministers issued a decree in which it decided “to declare a national state of emergency with regard to public safety for a period of 90 extendable days.” The emergency was declared “for the purpose of reinforcing the work done by the National Police in combating the violence and crime that are overwhelming the country,” the text added. At the same time, it “instructs the Armed Forces to cooperate in the performance of law-enforcement functions, on an exceptional basis, for 90 extendable days.” The decree “is fully in accordance with the law,” Vice President María Antonieta Guillén said at a press conference at the Presidential House. On November 29, the Honduran Congress passed an initiative granting police functions to military personnel, at President Porfirio Lobo’s request. Military personnel will be able to conduct searches, make arrests, confiscate weapons, and perform all police functions, and they will even be able to take action against police officers implicated in crimes. By Dialogo December 07, 2011last_img read more

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York U.S. Rep. Kathleen Rice and Nassau County Legis. Rose Walker joined doctors, staff, and patients of Gastroenterology Associates, one of the largest gastroenterology practices on Long Island, in helping raise awareness about colorectal cancer at the grand opening of its recently relocated offices and outpatient facility, the Long Island Center for Digestive Health, in Uniondale.March is National Colon Cancer Awareness Month, and the March 6 educational event and ribbon-cutting highlighted the importance of colon cancer aka colorectal cancer screening in the battle against this highly preventable disease, which claims more than 50,000 lives each year and remains the third-most common cancer in the United States and second-leading cause of cancer death.Several patients of Gastroenterology Associates and the Long Island Center for Digestive Health shared their personal stories of survival, with each advocating for screening. Both Legis. Walker and Rep. Rice spoke briefly as well. “I was honored an proud to attend the ribbon cutting for Gastroenterology Associates’ new headquarters—a beautiful, spacious facility with a kind, caring staff who goes out of their way to make their patients comfortable,” Legis. Walker told the Press about the experience, explaining that for her, raising awareness about colorectal cancer is personal. “It is always a pleasure to attend all the ribbon cuttings and events I am invited to, but some have a special significance. “In 2012, I was diagnosed with Stage 3 Colorectal Cancer,” she continued. “Thanks to the love and support of my family, friends and co-workers and the excellent care of my entire medical team, all affiliated with Winthrop Hospital, I am blessed to say I am now cancer-free. I am one of the lucky ones, and I feel that I have been given the opportunity to give back—to reach out to others and share the importance of screenings.”“I’m grateful to Dr. [Leonard B.] Stein and Dr. [Robert S.] Bartolomeo for inviting me to tour their new facility as we commemorate Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month and highlight the dangers of this disease and the potentially life-saving value of regular screenings,” Rep. Rice told the Press regarding the event. “We know that colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer among men and women combined–this year alone, more than 135,000 people will be diagnosed and more than 50,000 will die from it,” she continued. “We also know that this is one of the most highly preventable forms of cancer–the CDC estimates that we could prevent 60 percent of all colorectal cancer deaths if all adults over age 50 were regularly screened, but just one-in-three adults between age 50 and 75 are up to date on recommended screenings. “That has to change,” she added. Congresswoman Rice, the U.S. Representative for New York’s 4th congressional district, has long been a proponent of increasing accessibility and affordability to these life-saving preventive screenings. She is currently a cosponsor of bipartisan legislation, titled the “Removing Barriers to Colorectal Screening Act of 2017,” which would direct Medicare not to charge co-pays for colon cancer screenings that result in the discovery and removal of polyps. Currently, under the Affordable Care Act, Medicare and private insurers aren’t supposed to charge for co-pays for such screenings, including colonoscopies, explains her office. If a patient undergoes a screening and a polyp is detected and removed, however, the procedure gets reclassified as “Therapeutic” and not simply a screening, and they can be charged a co-pay.This bill would eliminate that possibility, ensuring that patients can’t be charged for these important screenings, whether a polyp is found and extracted or not.Rice, a Democrat who was elected to Congress in 2014 and previously served three terms as Nassau County District Attorney where she received national acclaim for her efforts combatting drunk driving, also cosponsored this bill in the last congressional session, and also cosponsored a resolution designating March 2017 as National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month in both sessions.Health experts advocate for regular colorectal cancer screenings for those 50 and over, stressing such preventive procedures can identify polyps before they become cancerous—though some are discouraged when there’s a chance its result could cost money, explains Rice’s office.Thus, these legislative initiatives would remove dissuading financial barriers and actually help save lives.Gastroenterology Associates is a renowned private group gastroenterology practice in Uniondale, NY specializing in high-quality digestive healthcare for patients experiencing a wide range of disorders. Long Island Center for Digestive Health (LICDH) is a distinguished non-hospital outpatient facility providing advanced diagnostic testing and procedures including upper endoscopy, colonoscopy, and more. Gastroenterology Associates’ new headquarters in Uniondale boasts ground-floor access for patients, plentiful parking, and is conveniently situated near Meadowbrook Parkway, Stewart Avenue and Hempstead Turnpike. LICDH, which shares the premises, is a New York State-licensed ambulatory endoscopy center that has been awarded a Certificate of Recognition from the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and is accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care. This is the second consecutive year Rep. Rice has joined Gastroenterology Associates and LICDH’s staff in publicly raising awareness during Colorectal Awareness Month about the preventable disease and the significance of screening—and she vows to continue this all-important quest in Congress.“We need to keep raising awareness and educating the public, like we did [at Gastroenterology Associates] and will continue doing all month,” Congresswoman Rice told the Press. “And we need to make screenings more affordable so that no one can be denied or discouraged from getting a procedure that could save their life. “I’ve cosponsored bipartisan legislation that would help eliminate copays for colon cancer screenings, and I’m going to keep working to get it passed,” she added.Legis. Walker, a Republican, further emphasized the value of colorectal cancer screening and raising awareness, explaining it could quite literally mean the difference between life and death.“Yes, colorectal cancer is a deadly disease, yet highly preventable,” she said. “If I had gone for screening, perhaps I would not have had to go through all I did—chemo, radiation, surgery, then more chemo and more surgery—so I need to speak out to others, share my story, thank those who saved my life, and hopefully encourage everyone to follow the advice of specialists, because prevention is our first line of defense.”Featured Photo: U.S. Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-Garden City) (far left) and Nassau Legis. Rose Walker (R-Hicksville) (far right) join staff and patients of Gastroenterology Associates and the Long Island Center for Digestive Health (LICDH) during its grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony at its new Uniondale headquarters on March 6, 2017 to help stress the importance of colorectal cancer screenings during National Colon Cancer Awareness Month. Gastroenterology Associates is located at 106 Charles Lindbergh Blvd., Suite B, Mitchel Field, in Uniondale, NY 11553. Long Island Center for Digestive Health shares the premises, and is located in Suite C. To talk with staff or schedule an appointment, call 516-248-3737 or 516-794-1868, respectively, or visit ligastrohealth.com.Gastroenterology Associates is a client of Morey Publishing, the parent company of the Long Island Press.last_img read more

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A convicted rapist was arrested Wednesday for allegedly killing a 23-year-old woman whose body was found in the Froehlich Farm Nature Preserve in Huntington three years ago, Suffolk County police said.Fernando RomualdoFernando Romualdo, 28, of Huntington Station, pleaded not guilty Thursday at Suffolk County court to a charge of second-degree murder.Homicide Squad detectives alleged that he killed Sarah Strobel, also of Huntington Station. A person walking on a path found her body on Oct. 3, 2013.Romualdo is currently serving three years in upstate Mohawk Correctional Facility for an unrelated second-degree rape conviction, records show.Judge Barabara Kahn ordered Romualdo held without bail on the murder charge. He is due back in court July 11.last_img read more

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first_imgOct 4, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A powerful motivator for getting a seasonal influenza vaccine is having suffered through the misery of the disease.However, factors that sway people away from vaccination are a lack of information and outright misconceptions, the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) found in a consumer survey released at a press conference today. The conference, with some of the nation’s top health experts in attendance, marked the start of the flu immunization season.Julie Gerberding, MD, MPH, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said there will be 100 million seasonal influenza vaccine doses available this year, 17 million more than last year. However, Gerberding and other experts worry that Americans, particularly those with health risks, won’t take full advantage of the increased supply.”We’d like to see the highest-ever rates, especially among seniors,” she said. “The vaccine is here, and the time is now. Let’s make this our best flu season.”The study found that less than half of respondents (48%) planned to get a flu shot this year. The study, a random-dial telephone sample of 1,014 adults (503 men and 511 women) aged 18 and older, found that of the 52% who said they wouldn’t get a flu shot, 43% didn’t think influenza was serious enough to warrant vaccination.More than half of the respondents said they regarded a cold and influenza as similar health problems and would treat them similarly. Close to half—46%—of respondents incorrectly thought that flu vaccine could cause the illness itself.Better than half of those who planned to be immunized this year said they made vaccination a priority after suffering a bout of flu in a previous season, according to the survey.Study respondents knew that the period of September through November is the best time to be immunized—but they erroneously believed that December is too late to benefit from the vaccine.”We’d like to correct that perception,” said Susan J. Rehm, MD, NFID medical director and vice chair of the Department of Infectious Diseases at the Cleveland Clinic. The flu season peaks in December, January, and February, sometime even in March, she said.  “The medical community must reinforce that later-season vaccination is useful, even if the disease has already begun in your area.”Mark McClellan, MD, PhD, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said about a third of seniors don’t get annual flu shots, even though vaccination is free through Medicare part B. He noted that each year, 200,000 people are hospitalized with influenza, and 36,000 die of the disease.”There’s a prevention gap here that we see too often, and we’re working very hard to close it,” he said.Medicare officials are hoping to increase flu vaccination rates among seniors with a personalized, grassroots approach that focuses on preventive care, including vaccination and screening, McClellan said. Preventive services are now being promoted and delivered with the same system that administers the new Medicare prescription drug benefit, he said.Another group on which health experts are focusing their flu vaccine message is parents of children aged 6 months to 5 years. Earlier this year, the CDC added 2-, 3-, and 4-year-olds (and their household contacts) to its recommendations about who should receive the flu vaccine.Julia McMillan, MD, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics committee on infectious diseases and vice chair for pediatric education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said now is the time for parents to call their children’s pediatrician to schedule an appointment for vaccination. Children in the recommended age-group who have not been immunized before will need two doses, 1 month apart.”Rates aren’t what they should be, especially in kids who have chronic conditions such as asthma,” she said, noting that children who have chronic conditions are five times as likely as healthy children to be hospitalized with influenza.Health officials also said they’d like to make people more aware of the CDC recommendation that pregnant women should receive flu shots. In the NFID survey, less than half (49%) thought that pregnant women should be vaccinated.Healthcare workers are another group with relatively low vaccination rates, despite the CDC’s longstanding recommendation that they get annual flu shots. Only 36% of healthcare workers are vaccinated each year; unvaccinated workers contribute to flu outbreaks and staffing shortages in health care facilities.The CDC has issued stronger, earlier recommendations for healthcare workers, and in June the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) issued a new infection control standard that requires accredited organizations to offer flu immunizations to staff, volunteers, and others who have close contact with patients. The requirement takes effect Jan 1, 2007.Gerberding said vaccine manufacturers will deliver 75 million doses of vaccine by the end of October, and she hopes there will be fewer problems with uneven distribution of the vaccines this year. Because vaccine distribution is handled by the private sector, coordination can be difficult, she said. However, she added that the National Influenza Vaccine Summit, made up of 130 industry groups, has been working to resolve problems with supply and distribution.last_img read more

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first_imgTopics : The renovated wings of the museum were restored in 2019 with assistance from the World Monuments Fund.Yemen’s bloody five-year conflict pits pro-government forces, including a Saudi-led coalition, against the Iran-backed Huthi rebels who have conquered much of the country’s north, including the capital Sanaa. Thousands have died, millions have been displaced, and disease and famine stalk the cities and villages, in what the UN calls the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.Yemen’s rich cultural heritage has not been spared.Inside the museum in Taez, a city ringed by mountains, ancient cooking utensils and priceless manuscripts lie exposed on wooden tables draped with old cloth. The refurbished side is resplendent with curved ornamental moldings juxtaposed with intricate ochre brickwork, reminiscent of the style of old Sanaa, one of Yemen’s four UNESCO World Heritage sites.Established as an Ottoman palace, then a residence for one of Yemen’s last kings, it became a museum in 1967.It has since been “bombed” and “pillaged” according to its director, Ramzi al-Damini.Taez, in Yemen’s southwest, is under government control but surrounded by Huthi rebel forces. ‘Great pride’ “How did it get out? We don’t know, but it was up for auction in Europe where it might have already been sold,” said the archaeologist.Some Yemeni treasures have resurfaced in private collections in Gulf countries, including Qatar and Kuwait, said Jeremie Schiettecatte, an expert in the archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula at France’s National Centre for Scientific Research.He said he believed the destruction of Yemeni heritage elicited less international outcry than the desecration of artifacts in Syria and Iraq because of the involvement of Saudi Arabia, a major market for Western arms, in Yemen’s conflict.”There’s a very strong link between the Yemenis and their heritage — including pre-Islamic heritage,” he said.”[There is] great pride in the period when southern Arabia [modern-day Yemen] was the most advanced society on the Arabian Peninsula.”At the end of June, a renowned French archaeologist and his husband were charged as part of a sprawling investigation into the trafficking of antiquities from the Middle East, including Yemen.A world away from the Paris probe, Taez’s museum plans to re-open its doors in 2023, by which time it is hoped the conflict will have abated.”Archaeological sites are being neglected and they are a major part of our appeal to tourists,” said Taez resident Hisham Ali Ahmed.”I’m hoping for a return to a normal life and a state that takes care of antiquities.”center_img Antiquities sold online “The museum is packed with rare antiquities, including manuscripts and stone sculptures, swords and shields,” Damini told AFP.”We’ve recovered some of it, but significant pieces are still missing,” said the director as he stood in a courtyard piled with bricks and steel girders.He said he was in contact with the authorities and UNESCO to update them about the restoration works, but also to “recover articles smuggled out of the country”.”It’s a difficult process,” said Mohanad al-Sayani, head of Yemen’s General Organisation of Antiquities and Museums (GOAM), which works with UNESCO.”We have two governments, a country in a state of war — and the trafficking of antiquities existed long before the conflict.”Though there are no figures for the number of antiquities stolen, the authorities and UNESCO have undertaken inventories at several of Yemen’s museums.Restoration work is also underway at historical sites in Sanaa, Zabid, Shibam and Aden, Sayani said.The war has “massively affected” archaeological sites, said Yemeni archaeologist Mounir Talal.He recounted the bombings of old Sanaa, of a museum in Dhamar that used to house thousands of artifacts, and of Taez’s Al-Qahira citadel, which blends into the mountainside.”Palaces which date back to the Ayyubid dynasty [12th and 13th centuries] and the Rasulid dynasty [13th to 15th centuries] were, unfortunately, destroyed inside the citadel,” he said.”We find stolen Yemeni antiquities for sale online or at public auctions,” Talal added, giving the example of a grand stone-hewn throne from the Saba kingdom, best known for the Queen of Sheba. The two facades of the National Museum in the Yemeni city of Taez bear testament to the ravages of a war that has consumed the Arabian Peninsula country.One side has been beautifully restored to its former grandeur, recalling a traditional palace from earlier eras.The other is pocked with damage, crumbling away to reveal collapsed floors and shattered walls.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Nikkei had dipped on Friday after Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s resignation stirred doubts about future fiscal and monetary stimulus policies.Those concerns were eased somewhat by news Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga, and a close ally of Abe, would join the race to succeed his boss. A slimmed-down leadership contest is likely around Sept. 13 to 15.The next event of note in Asia will be China’s official manufacturing PMI survey for August which is forecast to show a slight improvement to 51.2 as the recovery there continues.The United States ISM manufacturing survey is also expected to show a continued pick up in activity in August, while August payrolls on Friday are forecast to rise 1.4 million with the unemployment rate dipping to a still painfully-high 9.8 percent. Asian shares notched a fresh two-year high on Monday as investors wagered monetary and fiscal policies globally would stay super stimulatory for a protracted period, keeping the safe-haven dollar on the defensive.MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan added 0.2 percent to reach its highest since June 2018, extending a 2.8 percent rise last week.Tokyo’s Nikkei rallied 1.4 percent aided by news Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway had bought more than 5 percent stakes in each of the five leading Japanese trading companies. A host of Federal Reserve officials are set to speak this week, kicking off with Vice Chair Richard Clarida later Monday as they put more flesh on the bank’s new policy frameworkFed Chair Jerome Powell boosted stock markets last week by committing to keep inflation at 2 percent on average, allowing prices to run hotter to balance periods when they undershot.The risk of higher inflation in the future, assuming the Fed can get it there, was enough to push up longer-term Treasury yields and sharply steepen the yield curve.Yields on 30-year bonds jumped almost 16 basis points last week to stand at 1.508 percent, 137 basis points above the two-year yield. The spread was now approaching the June gap of 146 basis points which was the largest since late 2017.That shift was of little benefit to the US dollar given the prospect of short rates staying super-low for longer, and the currency fell broadly.Early Monday, the dollar index was down at 92.211 and just a whisker above the recent two-year low of 92.127. The euro edged higher to US$1.1915, having climbed 0.9 percent last week.Marshall Gittler, head of investment research at BDSwiss Group, noted speculators had already built up record levels of long positions in the euro which could work to limit further gains.“A truly crowded trade that will take more news to push higher,” he argued.The dollar did steady a little on the yen at 105.47, after dropping 1.1 percent on Friday before finding support in the 105.10/20 zone.In commodity markets, the drop in the dollar helped gold bounce to $1,974 an ounce.Oil prices steadied, having dipped on Friday after Hurricane Laura passed the heart of the US oil industry without causing any widespread damage.Brent crude futures rose 15 cents to $45.96 a barrel, while US crude gained 6 cents to $43.03.Topics :last_img read more

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first_imgILOILO City – Police caught a 21-year-oldman while having a “pot session” in Barangay Tacas, Jaro district. The suspect was detained and chargedwith violation of Republic Act 9165, or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Actof 2002./PN Police officers chanced upon Jusasniffing suspected dried marijuana leaves along the road around 9 p.m. on Feb.29. center_img Mike Jiones Jusa of BarangayAnilao, Pavia, Iloilo was taken to the Jaro police station. last_img

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first_imgSATURATION PATROL. Policemen check out these youngsters having a late night drinking binge in La Paz, Iloilo City. IAN PAUL CORDERO/PN The city government has set up a 24/7command operation center at city hall (Penthouse 2). It will focus on allconcerns related to COVID-19. *essential skeletal workforce of the city and provincial government of Iloilo Exemptedfrom the curfew are the following: Thecurfew is from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. and covers all people in the city except incases of emergency and if the sole purpose of going out is to buy food,medicines, basic necessities and prime commodities. “These are extraordinary times. Wehave to be ready to go through extraordinary measures,” said Treñas. Treñas also announced that thetwo-week cancellation of classes in all levels – which starts today – will beextended until April 14 instead of March 31. *those traveling for medical and humanitarian reasons “They shall be subjected to theprotocols, decision tools and triages issued by accredited health authorities,and escorted to their respective residences for voluntary home quarantine,”read the EO. *public transport services (buses, jeepneys, tricycles and the like) asdetermined by the Public Safety and Transportation Management Office (PSTMO) Offenderswill be brought to the barangays where they reside and endorsed to the punong barangay. No penalties will beimposed. Otherimplementers are the City Social Welfare and Development Office, police, TaskForce on Good Morals, Iloilo City Peace and Order Council, and other deputizedpersons. Executive Order (EO) No. 050identified the following as “non-essential entry”: *persons transiting to the airport or seaport facilities On March 16, the city governmentstarted imposing travel restrictions. Treñas prohibited the “non-essentialentry of persons travelling by sea” until April 14. *persons on their way home from work Yesterday the Sangguniang Panlungsod(SP) approved an ordinance for this. *authorized government officials Punong barangays, barangay councils andbarangay tanods are authorized toprimarily implement the curfew. * people travelling by sea from MetroManila (and its cities), Batangas seaport through the roll-on/roll-off ports center_img Treñas also announced that the city ishiring nine doctors with a monthly salary of P60,000 until December 2020 and 28nurses with almost P20,000 monthly compensation to augment the city’s healthworkforce. *those working in businesses with a work schedule within the curfew hours *persons delivering food and medicines Western Visayas remains free fromCOVID-19, according to the Department of Health (DOH). “Iwill wait for the ordinance. We need implementing rules for it,” he said. *health workers Treñas tasked the Iloilo City PoliceOffice, Armed Forces of the Philippines and Philippine Coast Guard to enforcethe border restriction. * people travelling by sea who, priorto entering Iloilo City, can be shown to have come from the 120 countriesidentified by the World Health Organization as having cases of COVID-19 The city government has an existingcurfew ordinance but only for minors.  Itis from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. “We are all in a difficult situation.I appeal for the understanding and cooperation of all,” said Treñas. However, the crew or passengers of thecargo ships or vessels cannot be allowed to disembark, the EO stressed./PN “All students are required to stay athome and be safe to prevent the spread of the virus,” he said. Cargo ships will be allowed to enterIloilo City, Treñas said, subject to the guidelines from the Department ofHealth’s (DOH) Bureau of Quarantine. *persons providing basic services and public utilities Immune-compromised people or those whoare at a higher risk of being infected by COVID-19 (such as senior citizens,children, and pregnant women) are also listed in the EO as “non-essentialentry”. ILOILO City – The city government ispoised to enforce a curfew as an added measure to the border restriction hereagainst the possible entry and spread of the coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19). MayorJerry Treñas told Panay News he may beable to sign the ordinance on Thursday and issue an executive order for itsimplementation. Called the “Expanded Social DistancingOrdinance”, it aims to “limit non-essential movement of people”.last_img read more

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first_imgIn a battle of 3A Top 10 Teams, The #1 Greensburg Pirates defeated The #5 Batesville Bulldogs 96-66 Thursday Night at Greensburg.The Pirates improve to 13-0 and 3-0 in EIAC Play.The Bulldogs fall to 7-3 and 1-1 in conference play.last_img

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