October 16, 2019
  • 6:45 pm Torontos film and television production hit recordbreaking 2 billion in 2016
  • 6:40 pm Leading the pack stuntwoman SJ Harris mourned after fatal Deadpool 2 crash
  • 8:33 am Actors history of domestic violence brought to light as Indian Horse opens
  • 3:52 am First Air crash miracle raises questions about Nunavut searchandrescue capacity
  • 3:44 am Aboriginal hockey championship kicks off in Kahnawake

first_imgOn Friday Rope made a public Facebook post about the vicious assault she experienced at the hands of Strongheart, along with a photo of her swollen, bruised face after she was released from hospital.A photo of Melanie Rope from 2010 just days after she says she was released from hospital after being viciously attacked by Strongheart in his Regina home. (Supplied)“He was threatening to kill me as he was beating me,” said Rope, recalling the night when she says Strongheart beat her in his Regina home after flying into a jealous rage. Rope says Strongheart was subsequently charged, convicted and sentenced on two counts of assault causing bodily harm. Advertisement Twitter New York-based actor Will Strongheart plays the supporting role of Virgil in the film Indian Horse. According to his bio on the film’s website he is a member of the Keeseekoose First Nation of Saskatchewan. (Elevation Pictures) Facebook Melanie Rope wants people to know about actor Will Strongheart’s history of violence against her and others, before making a choice about whether or not to see the movie Indian Horse.“It’s not about trying to take away from this movie, but maybe just giving people the option to think twice before before they go and see it,” said Rope, who is Nakoda woman from the Carry the Kettle Nakoda First Nation in Saskatchewan. She is currently a pre-social work student at the University of Regina and says she dated Strongheart for just under a year in 2009-2010.What Rope does want, is for people to know about Strongheart’s past and to discover how he was cast in such an important film.center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgWINNIPEG – The agreement to restore rail service to the town of Churchill in northern Manitoba will include at least $117 million from the federal government.The federal funding consists of $74 million to help repair the damaged rail line and buy it, along with the town’s port, from Denver-based Omnitrax. Ottawa is also committing another $43 million over 10 years to subsidize operations of the rail line.“Repair work on the rail line has already begun … and every effort is being made to complete the work and restore rail service before winter sets in,” International Trade Diversification Minister Jim Carr said at a news conference Friday that offered few details on what others involved in the deal are putting up.The rail line is the only land link to the subarctic community of 900 people, known for its polar bear tourist season and port on the western shore of Hudson Bay.The line was washed out by flooding in the spring of 2017. Since then, goods and people have had to be flown in and prices for groceries and fuel have skyrocketed.The tourist economy was hit hard, and some residents left town.Two weeks ago, after months of negotiations, a consortium called Arctic Gateway Group hammered out a deal to buy the line and port from Omnitrax, which had said it was losing money on the service and could not afford tens of millions of dollars in necessary repairs.The consortium includes several northern communities, Toronto-based Fairfax Financial Holdings and AGT Food and Ingredients, a Regina-based supplier of pulses and food ingredients.Carr and consortium officials would not reveal Friday how much money the consortium partners are putting in — they referred to an unspecified pool of money — or how much money Omnitrax is being paid.Carr would also not say whether the federal government would put up more money if its annual subsidies are not enough to prevent losses.“You don’t talk about hypotheticals in this business.”The rail line was once government-owned, but a former Liberal government sold it to Omnitrax in 1997. The rail line suffered from high maintenance costs due to the vast boggy terrain it covers, and lost a key customer when the Conservative government in 2012 moved to end the Canadian Wheat Board monopoly on western wheat.Carr said the new ownership group, which includes a built-in customer base with AGT, will make the rail line viable.Fairfax’s president was equally confident the restored line and port has untapped opportunities to ship goods to and from other countries through the Arctic.“The Russians — we have roughly 50,000 people north of the Arctic circle, they have a million and a half people and I said, 20 per cent of their GDP (goes) through there,” Paul Rivett said.Churchill Mayor Mike Spence said the months that have passed without rail service have been hard on the town. But people from other parts of Canada reached out.“I had people sending food hampers … high school students sending cards and school supplies,” Spence said. “So we never felt alone.”last_img read more

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first_imgTAYLOR, B.C. – At a District of Taylor Council meeting, on Tuesday, Council passed the first two readings of a Bylaw that would allow for Micro Breweries, Craft Distilleries, and Cannabis Retail within the District.Earlier this year, the District had been contacted by local business investors that showed interest in developing a small scale craft brewery within the municipality.According to District Staff, after reviewing the District’s Zoning Bylaw, it was determined that the proposed use is not permitted in any of Taylor’s commercial zones. Based on the interest expressed by the proponents, Staff prepared a proposal of zoning by-law amendments which looked at allowing both breweries and the sale of cannabis.The Cannabis Retail amendments proposed to the District of Taylor’s Zoning Bylaw are modelled closely after those adopted by the City of Fort St John.Later this summer, the District will be holding a public hearing on these Bylaw amendments before being adopted.More information on the Bylaw amendments can be found on the District of Taylor’s website.last_img read more

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first_imgWashington: US Acting Defence Secretary Patrick Shanahan has confirmed that North Korea conducted a weapons test, but said that it was “not a ballistic missile”. “I’m not going to go into the detailed intelligence, but the way I’d characterise is it is not a ballistic missile,” Shanahan told the media here on Thursday. Pressed on whether North Korea fired something into the air or conducted a ground test, Shanahan said: “You could use shoot, launch, test – they’re very synonymous terms,” The Hill magazine reported. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US He did not directly answer a question on whether the weapon was a new capability. “I’m not being cagey here, it’s just what’s important is it wasn’t ballistic,” he said. Shanahan added that there has been “no change to our posture or to our operations” after the test. North Korean state media announced on Thursday morning that leader Kim Jong-un had observed the test firing of a “new-type tactical guided weapon”. Kim called the test “an event of very weighty significance”, according to the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA). Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls KCNA did not specify what type of weapon was tested, but experts noted the use of the word “tactical” appeared to imply something short-range. As such, the test did not appear to violate North Korea’s self-imposed moratorium on missile and nuclear tests. Wednesday’s test was being interpreted as a sign of increasing impatience by North Korea as talks with President Donald Trump stall. Shanahan said on Thursday that he did not want to “rush” to judgment on the message being sent by North Korea ahead of fully analysing intelligence. But the fact that the weapon was not a ballistic missile is “a statement in and of itself”. A February summit between Trump and Kim ended with an impasse over sanctions relief, and there have been no signs of closing the gap between Washington and Pyongyang since. Last week, Kim said he would be open to a third summit with Trump, but gave the US until the end of the year to be more flexible in negotiations. Trump responded by touting his “excellent” personal relationship with Kim.last_img read more

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Rabat – New evidence revealed by a British newspaper suggests that Morocco had won the 2010 World Cup vote in May 2004, but FIFA decided to award it to South Africa.According to the Daily Telegraph, FIFA and Sepp Blatter were handed tapes in 2010 revealing that, unlike the official result of the vote announced by FIFA in May 2004, Morocco had actually won the vote. The official result of the vote was 10 for Morocco and 14 for South Africa.According to the same source, the information was obtained as part of an undercover investigation conducted by the Sunday Times in 2010, and handed over to FIFA to investigate it. The tapes contain conversations with Ismael Bhamjee, a former FIFA executive member, who resigned from the world football governing body in 2006 over a ticket selling scandal. Ismael was among the FIFA members who voted for Morocco’s bid.But FIFA had no interest in revealing the corruption scheme that surrounded the 2010 World Cup vote and deprived Morocco of its right to host the flagship tournament.These new allegations support the claims made by Saad Kettani, the president of the Organizing Committee for Morocco’s bid for the 2010 FIFA World Cup, earlier this week.In an interview with Moroccan French language website Medias24, he suggested that 2010 World Cup vote was marred by corruption and questionable practices.“Our file was impeccable and clean. Corrupt practices in the ranks of FIFA were known. The day we got the result we realized what had happened, but we played fair. It’s unfortunate, but it’s like that.” read more

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WASHINGTON — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell says a sharp rise in corporate debt is being closely monitored but currently the Fed does not see the types of threats that triggered the 2008 financial crisis.In remarks prepared for a banking conference in Fernandina Beach, Florida, Powell says views about risker corporate debt — known as leveraged lending — range from “this is a rerun of the subprime mortgage crisis” to “nothing to worry about here.”Powell said his view lies somewhere in the middle. He said the risks currently are “moderate.”His comments followed a Fed report earlier this month which showed that riskier corporate debt had grown by 20% in 2018 to $1.1 trillion, prompting the attention of regulators.Martin Crutsinger, The Associated Press

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10 December 2008The United Nations General Assembly today awarded its top human rights prize to seven global advocates ranging from a Congolese doctor who treats female victims of sexual violence, a nun who fought for indigenous rights before her murder in Brazil, and the assassinated Pakistani leader Benazir Bhutto. The UN Prize in the Field of Human Rights, awarded every five years, was presented at a General Assembly ceremony marking the 60th anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). The winners are former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Louise Arbour; United States ex-Attorney-General Ramsey Clark; Executive Director and co-founder of Jamaicans for Justice Carolyn Gomes; Denis Mukwege, co-founder of the General Referral Hospital of Panzi in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC); Human Rights Watch, represented by its executive director Kenneth Roth; Ms. Bhutto; and Dorothy Stang of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur who was murdered in Brazil three years ago. They join a distinguished roster of previous laureates that includes apartheid fighter and former South African President Nelson Mandela, US civil rights leader Martin Luther King, former US first Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, former US President Jimmy Carter, and Amnesty International. The prize was first awarded on 10 December 1968 on the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the UDHR. “As we mark the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, we acknowledge the tireless work and invaluable contribution of these individuals and organizations that have fought to see the rights and freedoms embodied in this historic document become a reality for people in all corners of the world,” Assembly President Miguel D’Escoto said. “These awardees constitute symbols of persistence, valour and tenacity in their resistance to public and private authorities that violate human rights. They constitute a moral force to put an end to systematic human rights violations.” read more

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HALIFAX — The three Maritime provinces are contributing $32.5-million to a new regional venture capital fund that will be privately managed.Nova Scotia Premier Darrell Dexter said May 14 the Build Ventures fund, based in Halifax, is aimed at helping companies that have had limited access to venture capital in the past.“We’re the furthest behind in Canada and Canada is well behind the United States, despite the fact that we have these extraordinary research institutions all around us,” Mr. Dexter said.“That’s a tragedy as far as I’m concerned.”The new fund will focus on companies that are in their infancy, but they must also have an established business model and some revenue generation, he said.Build Ventures will invest between $1-million and $5-million on each venture.Mr. Dexter said Nova Scotia’s Innovacorp — a Crown corporation — already provides venture capital to early stage companies, but the pool of public funds it draws from is too small.“We noticed there was a real problem with early stage venture capital,” he told an impromptu news conference inside a lab at the Innovacorp offices in Halifax.“The opportunities were segmented and relatively small. There was no pool that was particularly focused on Atlantic Canada.”He said his government first floated the idea four years ago at a premiers conference. Newfoundland and Labrador have yet to invest in the fund, but Mr. Dexter said he’s working on that.The Build Ventures fund now stands at $48.5-million, with Nova Scotia and New Brunswick contributing $15-million each, and P.E.I. putting in $2.5-million.Technology Venture Corp. of Moncton is contributing $5-million and BDC Venture Capital, an arm of the Crown-owned Business Development Bank of Canada, is contributing $10-million.The fund will be managed by Patrick Keefe, who previously worked for Innovacorp, and Rob Barbara, an investment manager at Toronto-based Burgundy Asset Management.They are investing $1-million in the fund.Daniel Boyd, president of Halifax-based ABK Biomedical, said his fledgling company has already received $1.3-million in funding from Innovacorp and other sources, but it needs more money to move on.“We’re limited by what we can get done with smaller funds,” he said.“To penetrate the market we’re after takes an awful lot of money … This fund sits right there and gives up a no-excuses opportunity to go and nail it.”Mr. Boyd said his company is developing small beads, no bigger than a grain of sand, that can be injected into patients with tumours. The beads are designed to accumulate in the vessels that feed tumours, blocking blood flow and killing them.The premier said the performance of the fund will be easily measured.“The fund has all of the reporting mechanisms,” he said. “It won’t be hard to analyze in terms of their … profit and loss statements.” read more

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CALGARY — Cenovus Energy Inc. (TSX:CVE) reported a profit in its second quarter, boosted by its purchase of most of the Canadian assets of ConocoPhillips.The company reported a quarterly profit of $2.64 billion or $2.37 per share, including a $1.8-billion non-cash revaluation gain on its interest in an oilsands joint venture with ConocoPhillips that it acquired full ownership in.The profit compared with a loss of $267 million or 32 cents per share in the same quarter last year.On an operating basis, Cenovus reported a profit of $398 million or 36 cents per share in its latest quarter compared with a loss of $39 million or five cents per share a year ago.Gross sales totalled $4.08 billion, up from nearly $2.75 billion.In May, Cenovus closed the acquisition of most of ConocoPhillips’s Canadian assets including the oilsands joint venture and most of its Deep Basin conventional assets in Alberta and British Columbia. read more

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Former Minister Johnston Fernando made a statement to the police Financial Crimes Investigations Division (FCID) today.Fernando was asked to appear before the FCID to make the statement today.

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Over 200 drunk drivers were arrested during a special Police operation conducted in the Western Province early this morning.The Police said that 222 motorists were arrested for being under the influence of liquor while driving. The arrests were made between 12.00 a.m and 5.00 a.m. today. (Colombo Gazette)

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Western cities expected to lead growth, Conference Board report says OTTAWA – Cities in Western Canada are expected to lead the country’s metropolitan areas in economic growth this year, a report by the Conference Board of Canada says.Saskatoon, Regina, Edmonton, Calgary and Vancouver make up the top five in the board’s latest outlook for 13 Canadian metropolitan areas while Ottawa-Gatineau and Victoria are at the bottom of the list as government spending cuts take their toll.Growth in Saskatoon is forecast to reach 5.2 per cent this year, up from 4.1 per cent in 2012, while Regina’s economy is expected to grow five per cent, repeating its performance last year.“Despite some setbacks, Saskatchewan’s economy is expected to perform well in the near term, with real GDP forecast to expand 3.5 per cent this year — more than twice the national average,” board’s fall metropolitan outlook said.Calgary is expected to grow by 3.3 per cent, Edmonton by 4.2 per cent and Vancouver by 2.2 per cent.That compared with growth of 4.3 per cent, 5.9 per cent and 2.6 per cent for the three cities respectively in 2012.“Despite some risks, Alberta’s economy will get a boost from the rebuilding effort after the floods and the infrastructure investment needed to accommodate increases in oil sands production,” the report said.Meanwhile, Vancouver’s economy is being affected by slower growth in manufacturing and construction.Overall the Conference Board said the Canadian economy is expected to grow by 1.7 per cent this year, however it suggested that the improving U.S. economy would give a boost to 2014.“Through much of the first half of this year, economic indicators provided few encouraging signs. But recently, prospects seem to be changing for the better,” the Ottawa-based economics think-tank said.The five Western Canadian cities stand in contrast with the other eight areas studied, which are expected to growth by less than two per cent this year.In Toronto, which is expected to be hampered by weaker manufacturing and services sectors, growth will be limited to 1.6 per cent in 2013.Halifax is forecast to post growth of 1.7 per cent, while Winnipeg is expected to grow by 1.4 per cent.Montreal, Quebec City and Hamilton are each expected to grow about 1.3 per cent this year.Ottawa-Gatineau is expected to expand by 0.8 per cent in 2013 due to spending cuts by the federal government.Victoria is expected to grow by 0.1 per cent. by The Canadian Press Posted Sep 27, 2013 10:24 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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FedEx 2Q profit jumps 23 per cent, but performance misses expectations In this Dec. 15, 2014 photo, courier Stephen Werts loads packages onto a truck for delivery at a FedEx facility, in Marietta, Ga. FedEx reports quarterly financial results on Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014. (AP Photo/David Goldman) FedEx’s second-quarter earnings soared 23 per cent, but the package delivery company missed Wall Street forecasts due partially to a lower-than-expected benefit from falling fuel prices.FedEx also said Wednesday that a jump in plane maintenance blunted gains the company reaped from managing costs, lowering its pension expense and growing its export package revenue.Shares of the Memphis, Tennessee, company fell more than 4 per cent in midday trading.FedEx has been saving money from cheaper fuel, but company executives told analysts that fuel delivered only a slight benefit to operating income in the quarter. The company buys its fuel based on contracts tied to prices set during the preceding week or month, and those prices did not decline as quickly as daily rates, which fell almost 30 per cent from August to November.The company said it was working to adjust more quickly to those daily market rates.Removing the fuel issue, analyst Benjamin J. Hartford said he saw “clear margin improvement in the core Express business” in the quarter. Hartford covers FedEx for Robert W. Baird & Co.Overall, FedEx Corp. earned $616 million, or $2.14 per share, in its fiscal second quarter, up from $500 million, or $1.57, in last year’s quarter. Total revenue climbed 5 per cent to $11.94 billion.Analysts expected FedEx to earn $2.22 per share on revenue of $11.97 billion, according to Zacks Investment Research.FedEx and rivals like UPS are heading into the final stretch of their busiest period of the year, the peak holiday shipping season. They are hoping to avoid a repeat of last December, when an ice storm and a surge in last-minute online shopping caught them off-guard. About 2 million packages promised for delivery by Christmas Eve didn’t make it.This time, FedEx planned to hire 50,000 seasonal workers and invest in its ground-shipping network to make deliveries on time. The company has forecast a record number of deliveries, 8.8 per cent more than the holidays in 2013.FedEx executives offered no details on shipping volume so far this season, but company executives told analysts during a conference call that they’ve already had several days that rank among the busiest in company history. They also noted that labour issues at West Coast ports have held up cargo and forced the company to shift resources, which raises expenses.CEO and Chairman Fred Smith said he expects that the port issues will lead to more retail items being out of stock and could cause more gift card purchases instead of merchandise.“The slowdown in the West Coast ports has been a much bigger deal than people think,” he said.FedEx also said Wednesday that it still expects full-year earnings of between $8.50 and $9 per share.Analysts surveyed by FactSet forecast earnings of $9.11 per share for the year.Shares of FedEx fell $7.62, to 4.4 per cent, to $166.64 in midday trading while broader indexes had climbed slightly. The stock had climbed 21 per cent since the beginning of the year through Tuesday’s close, more than tripling the gain of the Standard & Poor’s 500 index. by Tom Murphy, The Associated Press Posted Dec 17, 2014 5:44 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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Iowa linebacker Josey Jewell tackles Ohio State quarterback J.T. Barrett during the Hawkeyes’ game against the Buckeyes on Nov. 4. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorIOWA CITY, Iowa — No. 6 Ohio State never led for a single second against Iowa, as the unranked Hawkeyes more than doubled its average of 25 points per game and scored the most points ever against an Urban Meyer-coached team Saturday. A week after completing a 15-point fourth-quarter comeback against Penn State that Meyer called the best of his career, Ohio State (7-2, 5-1 Big Ten) could not make up a 21-point third-quarter deficit and fell 55-24 to Iowa (6-3, 3-3 Big Ten) at Kinnick Stadium.Thousands of gold-and-black-clad fans stormed the field to celebrate the win, which crushed Ohio State’s hopes of reaching the College Football Playoff, just as Buckeye fans had done the week before.“Obviously turnovers, they controlled the line of scrimmage, we couldn’t stop them,” Meyer said dejectedly. “Good team, tough environment, we didn’t play very well.”Everything that went right against the Nittany Lions went wrong for Ohio State against the Hawkeyes. “Coming off an emotional win last week against Penn State, and then walking into a hostile environment that we knew, Kinnick Stadium, it’s got it’s Kinnick Curse or whatever you want to call it,” redshirt center Billy Price said. “We just didn’t come prepared today, we weren’t nine units strong and it resulted with the loss today.”Quarterback J.T. Barrett thrust himself into Heisman Trophy contention with a 33-for-39, 328-passing yard performance against the Nittany Lions, but toiled against the Hawkeyes, completing 18-of-34 passes for 208 yards and rushing for a team-high 14 carries for 63 yards. His game-opening interception was just his first of career-high four interceptions. He drove the Buckeyes down the field 80, 74 and 77 yards on the second, third and fourth drives, respectively. But Ohio State picked up just 33 yards on its next seven drives combined.Leading by 14 points late in the third quarter, Iowa sent its field-goal unit onto the field for what seemed to be a short field goal, but instead delivered a gut punch to Ohio State. Rather than kicking, the Hawkeyes spread the formation out and punter Colten Rastetter hit long snapper Tyler Kluver for an 18-yard gain as Meyer stood beside the side judge and decided not to call a timeout. On the next play, Quarterback Nate Stanley hit tight end T.J. Hockenson for a 2-yard touchdown, extending the lead to three touchdowns.The Hawkeyes took advantage of the Buckeyes’ weak secondary as Stanley went 20-of-31 for 226 yards and finished with a season-high five touchdowns. Tight ends Hockenson and Noah Fant led Iowa with five and four catches for 71 and 54 yards, respectively.“It’s kind of hard to explain [the feeling of the loss],” Lewis said. “Have the feeling of embarrassment, feeling of just… As a leader, I feel like I let a lot of people down.”Iowa relied heavily on speedy running back Akrum Wadley, who took 20 carries 118 yards. The Hawkeyes averaged 6.4 yards per carry, more than any team has rushed for against Ohio State in a single game this season.“Nobody expected that, I don’t think, on the defense because we play defense and take pride in stopping the run,” redshirt senior defensive end Tyquan Lewis said.Though the Hawkeyes entered the game having only scored 20-plus points in half of their eight games, they reached the threshold with 13:41 remaining in the second quarter as the Buckeyes seemed incapable of stopping, or even slowing down the Hawkeyes. Iowa outgained Ohio State 487-371 in total yards and picked up 24 first downs.“You expect to go into every game and dominate and play like the Silver Bullets,” Lewis said. “Obviously it didn’t turn out that way. We’ve just got to bounce back.”Ohio State allowed Penn State to score its first touchdown 15 seconds into the game last Saturday. This week, Iowa one-upped the Nittany Lions as sophomore safety Amani Hooker intercepted Barrett’s first pass attempt and ran it back for the game’s opening touchdown, just eight seconds into the game.Ohio State abandoned its running backs during the majority of the game. J.K. Dobbins and Mike Weber combined for 11 carries and 78 yards. Sophomore defensive end Nick Bosa was flagged and ejected for targeting for a head-to-head hit on Stanley near the end of the second quarter. The Buckeyes will be back in action at noon Saturday when they take on No. 24 Michigan State at Ohio Stadium. read more

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Asgeir HallgrimssonMladen BojinovićParis handballRobert Gunnarsson French Elite division team, Paris Handball announced reinforcement for the upcoming season. As we wrote before, team from the French capital will be in the new season stronger for current Montpellier player, Mladen Bojinovic (35), but also for Icelandic duo, line player from Rhein Neckar Lowen, Robert Gunarsson (32) and  back from Hannover Burgdorf, Asgeir Hallgrimsson (28).source: handnews.fr ← Previous Story Velux EHF CL TOP 16 Draw – Ready? Next Story → V Men’s and Women’s Beach Handball World Championships in Oman

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first_img Posted: March 6, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, March 6, 2019 Former Sweetwater Union HS District employee accused of embezzling more than $50,000 KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsCHULA VISTA (KUSI) – A former employee of the Sweetwater Union High School District was arrested on suspicion of embezzling more than $50,000 in money orders from the district, police reported today.Danya Margarita Williams, 42 of Chula Vista, was taken into custody Tuesday and booked into the Las Colina Detention Facility on suspicion of stealing the money while she was employed by the district, Chula Vista police Capt. Phil Collum said.District officials discovered the alleged embezzlement in late 2017 and reported it to Chula Vista police, Collum said.Detectives worked with district officials and determined that Williams had allegedly appropriated more than $50,000 in money orders between June 2016 and November 2017, he said.As part of her job, Williams was responsible for processing money orders received for fingerprint background investigations at the district, which are required during employment screening, according to police.Each background investigation costs between $52 to $75 per applicant and the applicants pay the fee using money orders, Collum said.“Instead of processing the money in accordance with district requirements, Williams deposited the money into her personal bank account,” Collum alleged.The exact amount of money that Williams allegedly embezzled was not revealed, nor was it immediately clear if she posted bail. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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first_imgHOLLYWOOD, FLA. (WSVN) – Several people sustained injuries after, officials said, they were involved in a rollover accident along Interstate 95 in Hollywood, Wednesday evening.Officials said at least three cars were involved in a crash in the northbound lanes near the Sheridan Street exit, at around 5:30 p.m.One car could be seen upside down.Several injuries were reported, although it is unclear how many people were hurt and what the extent of those injuries may be.Authorities initially shut down all express lanes, along with two of the general purpose lanes, while they investigated.The scene has since been cleared.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

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first_imgYour Tewksbury Today is Tewksbury’s premiere online hyperlocal news source. Follow YTT on Facebook and Twitter.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNEIGHBOR NEWS: What’s Making Headlines In Tewksbury?In “Community”NEIGHBOR NEWS: What’s Making Headlines In Tewksbury?In “Community”NEIGHBOR NEWS: What’s Making Headlines In Tewksbury?In “Community” TEWKSBURY, MA — Ever wonder what’s making news next door in Tewksbury? Bill Gilman, editor of Your Tewksbury Today, has the answer!Below is a collection of top Tewksbury stories, primarily written by Gilman, that were recently published on his popular website.Top Tewksbury Stories (April 22-April 29):Tewksbury Man Among Three Pagan Motorcycle Gang Members Arrested In Everett RaidTewksbury Police Investigating Car Abandoned In BrookGoFundMe Page Set Up To Help Victims Of Martha Avenue FireJumpin’ Juba To Kickoff Tewksbury Concert SeriesAT THE LIBRARY: Library To Offer 3 Gardening Programs & 3 Environment Programslast_img read more

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first_img Share your voice Comment 1 Woodstock turns 50 this year.  Getty Images For 50 years, we’ve stewed with the cultural significance of the three-day peace and music blowout that was the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival. It’s shorthand for the late ’60s and increasingly synonymous with a generation that redefined youth culture. It would be an impressive feat of self-seclusion or obliviousness to never have seen images of a half million attendees wearing jeans and fringe and singing and dancing in mud-caked fields.The event weighs heavily for the artists it launched (Carlos Santana; it was super group Crosby, Stills,Nash & Young’s second gig), but also for becoming an idealized moment in the middle of the Vietnam War when a generation of young people came together for a few days of celebration and non violence. “What happened at White Lake this weekend, may have been more than an uncontrolled outpouring of hip young people, struggling as they did to survive,” one commentator said in the CBS Evening News at the time. A half-century later, there’s been plenty of interest in replicating it, even if the most recent attempt, Woodstock 50, never ended up happening due to difficulty finding a location and acts dropping out. Still, as well-trodden as some of the stories surrounding Woodstock are — the helicopters airlifting musical acts and food, the bad weather, the fact that it  didn’t actually happen in Woodstock, New York — a few details may have escaped you. Here are five things you might not know about the iconic cultural event.A band from movie Grease played a setFans of the 1978 movie musical Grease might remember Johnny Casino and the Gamblers, the band that played the televised Rydell High School dance. The band was actually called Sha Na Na and just 9 years before, took the stage at Woodstock right before Jimi Hendrix. Considering some of the other artists at Woodstock — The Who, Janis Joplin, The Grateful Dead, Santana — you might not think a band specializing in covers of Doo-Wop and early rock would land a spot on the roster. The group, which formed at Columbia University, came on the scene in 1969, both paying tribute to and sending up oldies that were, in actuality, not that old. Sha Na Na covered songs like Get a Job by the Silhouettes (the band pulled its name from the song’s “sha na nas” in the chorus) and Duke of Earl by Gene Chandler, as well as a smattering of Beach Boys songs. Good stuff, but not exactly Pete Townshend-guitar-smashing rock.Nevertheless, it was actually Hendrix who persuaded Woodstock organizers to catch Sha Na Na at a club, leading to them to offer the band a spot, according to Variety. The media initially ignored WoodstockAs large as Woodstock looms in the cultural consciousness — it’s the subject of how many articles 50 years after the fact? — not everyone anticipated its significance. That includes the media. Initially, The New York Times rejected a pitch from one of its writers to cover it at all, according to a 2009 NYT piece looking back at the event. The writer, Barnard Collier, went anyway, and managed to persuade his editors it was worth a story. The Times wasn’t alone in its apathy. When Collier walked into the trailer set up to accommodate press, it was empty. As a side note, Collier’s article is a real gem for explaining such terminology as “grass,” “joints” and “grooving.”By the end of the festival, though, all three major networks (CBS, ABC and NBC) ran stories recapping Woodstock, acknowledging the drug use and logistical failings of the promoters, as well as how surprised locals were the kids were so darned polite. One ABC commentator even used  aerial shots of the grounds to segue into a piece about overpopulation.  The Times’ lookback piece also included an interview with Kenneth A. Paulson, one of the founding editors of USA Today, who marked Woodstock as a turning point for how media covered youth culture. “The journalism world got hip very quickly,” he said. Most attendees missed Hendrix’s setWhile there’s no official number of Woodstock attendees, it’s thought to be somewhere around a half million. That was owing, in part, to the fact that the festival promoters made the event free when so many more people showed up than expected. Attendees put up with a lot, like rainstorms and a lack of food and water (Fyre Festival, anyone?). As Woodstock was coming to a close, though, the crowd thinned out significantly. By the time Hendrix, the closing act, took the stage at 9 a.m. Monday, Rolling Stone writer Jan Hodenfield wrote at the time, only about 30,000 people were still around. “Most of them straggled off into now free-flowing traffic that passed the clutter of a civilization that had spanned its own eternity in three days,” he wrote. That means they missed Hendrix’s iconic version of the Star Spangled Banner. On the Dick Cavett Show, Cavett asked Hendrix why he played it and noted that some folks were offended by the “unorthodox” take on the national anthem. “I’m American, so I played it,” Hendrix said, adding that “I thought it was beautiful.” Woodstock CrowdWoodstock was packed.  Ralph Ackerman/Getty Images The Grateful Dead played five songs in an hour and a halfJam bands, amma right?Organizers were split about a repeat performance A few months after Woodstock, in October 1969, Rolling Stone ran an article talking about the event’s aftermath. One of the organizers, Michael Lang, had said in a press conference just four days after Woodstock that they’d do it again the following August. It wouldn’t be in Bethel, New York, though. Max Yasgur, the dairy farmer who graciously allowed his land to become the scene of the festival, told the publication that 2,000 acres wasn’t enough space for a half million kids, and he was heading to Canada to decompress. On the other hand, one of the other organizers, Artie Kornfeld, summed up his feelings on the matter like this: “I don’t think there could be another Woodstock Music and Art Fair,” he said. “That trip’s been had.”Originally published Aug. 9. center_img Tags Musiclast_img read more

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